"WikiLeaks has unleashed a treasure trove of data to the internet, exposing information about the CIA's arsenal of hacking tools. Code-named Vault 7, the first data is due to be released in serialized form, starting off with "Year Zero" as part one. A cache of over 8,500 documents and files has been made available via BitTorrent in an encrypted archive. Password to the files is ' SplinterItIntoAThousandPiecesAndScatterItIntoTheWinds'.

The documents reveal that the CIA worked with MI5 in the UK to infect Samsung smart TVs so their microphones could be turned on at will. Investigations were carried out into gaining control of modern cars and trucks, and there is even a specialized division of the CIA focused on accessing, controlling and exploiting iPhones and iPads. This and Android zero days enables the CIA to "to bypass the encryption of WhatsApp, Signal, Telegram, Wiebo, Confide and Cloackman by hacking the "smart" phones that they run on and collecting audio and message traffic before encryption is applied."

Source: https://www.wikileaks.org/ciav7p1/

Apple has been awarded a patent for a system that prohibits smartphone users from taking photos and videos inside music venues or movie theatres, etc.

It outlines a system which would allow venues to use an infrared emitter to remotely disable the camera function on smartphones. According to the patent, infrared beams could be picked up by the camera, and interpreted by the smartphone as a command to block the user from taking any photos or videos of whatever they’re seeing. The patent also outlines ways that infrared blasters could actually improve someone’s experience at a venue. For example, the beams could be used to send information to museum-goers by pointing a smartphone camera at a blaster placed next to a piece of art.

"The patent also raises questions about the sort of power that this technology would be handing over to people with more nefarious intentions. Its application might help police limit smartphone filming of acts of brutality, or help a government shut off filming in certain locations."

Source: http://qz.com/718939/apple-patented-a-way-...
"The products to be released include a wristband, key ring fob and a sticker."
"The most interesting, and one could argue the one with the biggest potential to change, is the sticker. The discrete sticker can be stuck to any item the customer choses. This allows for great amounts of versatility and could potentially be a trend-setting wearable. Instinctively one would consider the smartphone as the most obvious place, but as technology and trends evolve the smartphone could be replaced with any item that the customer ‘can’t leave the house without’.

The price point for the devices appears to be spot on. With the sticker retailing for AUD$30 and with the fob and wristband going for AUD$40 and AUD$50. With these amounts of innovation, it appear Barclays is really looking to disrupt the way their customers are making payments. One thing to note when looking at these innovations is that the big four banks in Australia are not adverse to product releases, so watch this space. "

More here

Justin Huntsdale, Katina Michael, and Lauren Thrift. "Unliking Facebook - the social media addiction that has you by the throat"ABC Illawarra Jan. 2015. Original source document here: http://www.abc.net.au/local/stories/2015/01/23/4167400.htm

"At the top of your Facebook profile where you can write something for everyone to see, it asks 'What's on your mind'?

The answer is fast becoming 'this, at the expense of a lot else'."

Thanks for the link KMA.

An article from the Journal of Exercise Rehabilitation. Definitely worth a look if you feel you are addicted to your device.

Full citation is: Hyunna Kim* (2013), "Exercise rehabilitation for smartphone addiction", J Exerc Rehabil. Dec, 9(6): pp. 500–505. Published online Dec 31, doi:  10.12965/jer.130080 PMCID: PMC3884868

"Internet addiction after launching smartphone is becoming serious. Therefore this paper has attempted to sketch out the diverse addiction treatment and then check the feasibility of exercise rehabilitation. The reason to addict the internet or smartphone is personalized individual characters related personal psychological and emotional factors and social environmental factors around them. We have shown that 2 discernible approaches due to 2 different addiction causes: that is behavioral treatment and complementary treatment. In the behavioral treatment, cognitive behavioral approach (CBT) is representative methods for changing additive thoughts and behaviors. Motivational interviewing (MI) is also the brief approach for persons not ready to change their behavior. Mindfulness behavioral cognitive treatment (MBCT) also the adapted treatment based on CBT. There are different types following the emphatic point, mindfulness-based relapse prevention (MBRP) or mindfulness oriented recovery enhancement (MORE). It is apparent that therapeutic recreation, music therapy using drumming activity, and art therapy are useful complementary treatment. Exercise rehabilitation contained the systematic procedures and comprehensive activities compared to previous addiction treatments by contents and techniques. Exercise rehabilitation can treat both physical symptoms at first and mental problems in the next step. So more evidence-based exercise rehabilitation researches need to do, but it is highly probable that exercise rehab can apply for smartphone addiction.
Keywords: Smartphone addiction, Exercise rehabilitation, Cognitive behavioral therapy, Complementary treatment"

Now worth comparing the claims made by Michael and Michael in their research about a new 'breed' of Obsessive Compulsive Disorders (OCD) that will need to be defined with respect to new emerging technologies acting as triggers toward these behaviours. See for instance this media article in the Illawarra Mercury summarising the concerns.

 

 

"A Canadian law firm will use data from a Fitbit fitness tracker for the first time in court as an objective measure of activity.

The data will be provided by the plaintiff in a personal injury lawsuit in an effort to show life-affecting reduced activity post injury. But the case has implications for fitness trackers and smartwatches, including Motorola’s Moto 360 and Apple’s upcoming Apple Watch that can track movement.

The information for the case will be willingly provided by the plaintiff and processed by data company Vivametrica, which collects data from wearables and compares it with the activity and health of the general population. The plaintiff’s lawyers will use the data in an attempt to prove the accident’s detrimental affects.

“Till now we’ve always had to rely on clinical interpretation,” Simon Muller of McLeod Law firm in Calgary told Forbes. “Now we’re looking at longer periods of time though the course of a day, and we have hard data."

‘Only a matter of time before data from wearables is commonplace in litigation’

Beyond simple activity, fitness trackers are capable of measuring sleep and other biological data. In 2015 they are set to become more sophisticated with devices capable of measuring heart rate and detailed information about sleep patterns going on sale. Smart clothing with advanced sensors is also expected to take off by 2016, according to data from Gartner, providing another avenue for data collection.

“Wearables have the ability, among other things, to track an individual’s heart rate, workout regimens, as well as take photos and videos, and run searches on the web,” said Shakoori. “Additionally, most wearables mine geolocation data, such as running routes or the location where a photo was taken.”

The privacy of data from wearable devices has already been identified by regulators as an issue, including the US Federal Trade Commission. However, where data is stored about an individual, traditionally in the cloud as well as locally in dedicated smartphone apps, poses questions around access by law enforcement or courts and how rigorously companies defend individual’s data privacy rights."

Read more here

Thanks OG and KMA.

My observation? How long before this technology becomes mainstream? And then even the body-modders might be asking themselves that the 'group' they identify with is no longer unique... implantables, like tattoos, like piercing are about being 'different' but also the 'same'... But when everybody has one, even the boring old banks, will the body-modders really want one? "Yes" if it means customisation, and "no" if they think it means conformity to the masses.

le matins.jpg

"Ils portent le nom de leur amour sous leur peau

Un studio de tatouage à Zürich propose l'implant de micropuces électroniques lisibles via un smartphone. Une première en Suisse qui fait débat.

Mis à jour le 13.09.2014

Laura Juliano"

More here

 

Now compare with the football tattoo craze here and rugby league tattoo craze here.

Telegraph.uk

Telegraph.uk

CanberraTimes

CanberraTimes



More here. Thanks to Rob N!

Transient
"Blackphone, the first consumer-grade handset explicitly marketed as a privacy guardian, has begun shipping.
Revealed at the start of this year, Blackphone runs a fork of Android called PrivatOS and comes bundled with a variety of security-centric tools and subscriptions, including Silent Phone and Silent Text (for normal voice, video and text communications), Disconnect (VPN and search), SpiderOak (cloud storage) and the Smarter Wi-Fi Manager (for protection from dodgy hotspots)."
 

A "3D" "immersive" environment from your phone.

The tech group has decided not to sell it at this stage, instead releasing instructions on how people can build it themselves.

If you want to cut down on costs, you can even make one with an old pizza box. But if you’re not keen on getting your hands greasy, you can always order one for around $30 online from one of the many companies offering to build it for you.

A number of the contraptions are also being sold on eBay by attendees of Google’s I/O developers’ conference, where the company handed out thousands of them for free.

Besides cardboard, you need lenses (to focus on your phone’s screen as it’s otherwise blurry when close to your eyes), magnets, Velcro, a rubber band, and an optional near-field communications (NFC) tag. A piece of elastic and some staples might also be worth investing in to make it stay on your head hands-free.

So what does it do?

Like any other VR headset on the market, it brings the user into a 3D space.

Unlike other headsets, it does not require a desktop or laptop computer to be connected to it. Instead, all you need is an Android smartphone running an app called Cardboard that splits the screen into two images (one for each eye) to create the illusion of looking at a 3D environment once it is placed into the cardboard device.

It is a jaw-dropping experience, as demonstrated by a Google video of developers’ reactions to using it at Google’s I/O conference.

Having used Oculus Rift, I found Cardboard an almost identical experience. I’d go as far as saying the experience is actually as good, if not better. I also didn’t feel sick when using it, but this might have been because the apps created for Cardboard thus far don’t cause motion sickness. Others created by third parties might have this result, also known as the “simulator effect”.
Source: http://www.smh.com.au/digital-life/digital...