Jul 17, 2007—The American Medical Association (AMA) has officially established a code of ethics designed to protect patients receiving RFID implants. The recommendations focus on safeguarding a patient's privacy and health, and are the result of an evaluation by the AMA's Council on Ethical and Judicial Affairs (CEJA) regarding the medical and ethical implications of RFID chips in humans, as well as a follow-up report recently released. The latter discusses the possible advantages and specific privacy and ethical issues of usingRFID-enabled implantations for clinical purposes. 

Entitled "Radio Frequency ID Devices in Humans," the report is presented by Robert M. Sade, M.D., who chairs the CEJA. It acknowledges that RFID's use in health care "represents another promising development in information technology, but also raises important ethical, legal and social issues." The report adds, "Specifically, the use of RFID labeling in humans for medical purposes may improve patient safety, but also may pose some physical risks, compromise patient privacy, or present other social hazards." 

The AMA's report identifies three specific recommendations: The informed-consent process must include disclosure of medical uncertainties associated with these devices; physicians should strive to protect patients' privacy by storing confidential information only on RFID devices utilizing informational security similar to that required for medical records; and physicians should support research into the safety and efficacy of RFID devices implanted in human beings, and examine the role of doctors regarding the nonmedical uses of the technology. 

The recommendations now serve as ethical guidelines for physicians and caregivers, explains Steven Stack, M.D., a member of the AMA's board of trustees, and are officially part of the AMA's medical ethics code. While not law, the AMA's code of ethics has long served as a standard of conduct defining the essentials of honorable physician behavior. 

"The AMA is the largest professional organization representing the interest of physicians and patients in the U.S.," Stack says, "and the AMA's code of ethics is the most widely accepted guidance for physicians' professional, ethical practices." In fact, he adds, courts and governments often use the AMA's ethics codes as guidelines. 

Central to the AMA's recommendations is that RFID implantable devices still need to be researched. The report indicates such implants may present physical risks to patients, because the devices can migrate under the skin and become difficult to extract. It goes on to say the risks may be minimized "by constructing RFID tags from materials that permit surrounding tissue to encase the device." Furthermore, the document cautions that RFIDtags may electromagnetically interfere with electrosurgical devices (medical tools that use electrical currents for cauterization during surgery) and defibrillators, and that more research needs to be done regarding whether RFID tags might also affect the efficacy of pharmaceuticals.

More here

“In the long run, chip implants could make it less intrusive than some emerging ID systems which rely on physical biometrics (like your fingerprints or unique eye pattern),” says Alex Soojung-Kim Pang, author of the book “Distraction Addiction” and visiting scholar at Stanford's University’s Peace Innovation Lab.
“This should be a matter of individual choice, but fighting crime should be much easier using chips,” adds sci-fi author Larry Niven, who predicted chip implants in the ’70s. Niven said he supports chip implantation for security reasons, provided it is an opt-in measure.
Ramez Naam, who led the early development of Microsoft software projects and is now a popular speaker and author, said he envisions using chip implantation to help monitor the location of people with Alzheimer's disease.
They could be used to track the activities of felons who have been released from prison.
Chips are being used today to manage farm animals. Farmers can track sheep, pigs and horses as they move through a gate, weigh them instantly and make sure they are eating properly.
Device Under Skin Tells Doc You're OK (Or Not)
“Those same chips have found their way into RFID devices to activate the gas pump from a key ring and for anti-theft devices in cars,” said Stu Lipoff, an electrical engineer and Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers spokesman.
“There have been people who volunteered to use them for opening the door of an apartment as a personalized ID using your arm. It could be used to track criminals targeted for patrol who might wander into a restricted area.”
Possible uses in the future
Implants are normally useful only at short ranges – as you walk through a portal or close to a transponder. So using chip implants to track people would require an infrastructure of transponders scattered around a city that read their identity in public buildings and street corners, Lipoff said.

More here

Thanks for the link KMA.

An article from the Journal of Exercise Rehabilitation. Definitely worth a look if you feel you are addicted to your device.

Full citation is: Hyunna Kim* (2013), "Exercise rehabilitation for smartphone addiction", J Exerc Rehabil. Dec, 9(6): pp. 500–505. Published online Dec 31, doi:  10.12965/jer.130080 PMCID: PMC3884868

"Internet addiction after launching smartphone is becoming serious. Therefore this paper has attempted to sketch out the diverse addiction treatment and then check the feasibility of exercise rehabilitation. The reason to addict the internet or smartphone is personalized individual characters related personal psychological and emotional factors and social environmental factors around them. We have shown that 2 discernible approaches due to 2 different addiction causes: that is behavioral treatment and complementary treatment. In the behavioral treatment, cognitive behavioral approach (CBT) is representative methods for changing additive thoughts and behaviors. Motivational interviewing (MI) is also the brief approach for persons not ready to change their behavior. Mindfulness behavioral cognitive treatment (MBCT) also the adapted treatment based on CBT. There are different types following the emphatic point, mindfulness-based relapse prevention (MBRP) or mindfulness oriented recovery enhancement (MORE). It is apparent that therapeutic recreation, music therapy using drumming activity, and art therapy are useful complementary treatment. Exercise rehabilitation contained the systematic procedures and comprehensive activities compared to previous addiction treatments by contents and techniques. Exercise rehabilitation can treat both physical symptoms at first and mental problems in the next step. So more evidence-based exercise rehabilitation researches need to do, but it is highly probable that exercise rehab can apply for smartphone addiction.
Keywords: Smartphone addiction, Exercise rehabilitation, Cognitive behavioral therapy, Complementary treatment"

Now worth comparing the claims made by Michael and Michael in their research about a new 'breed' of Obsessive Compulsive Disorders (OCD) that will need to be defined with respect to new emerging technologies acting as triggers toward these behaviours. See for instance this media article in the Illawarra Mercury summarising the concerns.

 

 

Thanks for the link KMA.

"Ladies and gents, put down your technology and have more sex.
That's the advice from a team of scientists who found people are becoming so enveloped by their phone and tablets that their love lives are being put on the back burner. 
So if you are one of those reading this on your smartphone in bed, a glance across the sheets is likely to reveal your partner is engrossed in theirs too.
The researchers discovered 70 per cent of women said smartphones were interfering in their romantic relationship. 
The study said technology and the screens that consume us are creating 'technoference' in couples."

More here

Compare to declining birth rate in Japan in this article here. Could there be a link?

"Various reasons have been cited for the population decline, including:
  • The rising cost of childbirth and child-raising
  • The increasing number of women in the workforce
  • The later average age of marriage
  • The increasing number of unmarried people
  • Changes in the housing environment and in social customs."

"You're at the Westin Grand in Berlin having a luxurious vacation. After finishing a delicious bowl of mushroom consommé -- chanterelles are in season, after all -- you stroll up the lavish center staircase toward your room. Having left wallets in the past, you simply hover your Apple Watch over the door. "Click!" And that's that. Magnetic plastic cards are so uncivilized.

This is the future Apple imagines for you with its new Watch, and it's working with Starwood Hotels (the group that owns Westin, among others) to make that future a reality. And that's just one of several scenarios for Apple Watch that were introduced by Apple VP Kevin Lynch during a third-party app demo on stage in Cupertino, California."

"Beyond Starwood, American Airlines is also working on Apple Watch -- both are usingWatchKit, the software toolkit Apple built for third-party app development. The specific context wasn't given for its use with American, but one can easily imagine using Apple Watch as your electronic boarding pass."

Read more

http://www.engadget.com/2014/09/09/apple-watch-apps/

http://www.engadget.com/2014/09/09/apple-watch-apps/

http://www.tuaw.com/2014/04/30/kwikset-kevo-using-your-iphone-to-lock-and-unlock-doors/

http://www.tuaw.com/2014/04/30/kwikset-kevo-using-your-iphone-to-lock-and-unlock-doors/

http://www.tuaw.com/2014/04/30/kwikset-kevo-using-your-iphone-to-lock-and-unlock-doors/

http://www.tuaw.com/2014/04/30/kwikset-kevo-using-your-iphone-to-lock-and-unlock-doors/

http://www.tuaw.com/2014/04/30/kwikset-kevo-using-your-iphone-to-lock-and-unlock-doors/

http://www.tuaw.com/2014/04/30/kwikset-kevo-using-your-iphone-to-lock-and-unlock-doors/

More on Ingress 

I first came across location based role playing games (LBRPG) when I was researching for an ISTAS11 presentation done via Skype.

More recently I wrote this article which touched on some of the issues of knowing when AR has gone too far- real, not real? Who knows... and that's the real problem!

Check out aimbot below... that video is not for the queezy...


She said: 'I was talking to somebody and I went to put my phone in my pocket and it fell down the drain.

'I thought to myself 'I'm not leaving this' and I jumped down to get it.

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2595913/Help-Teenage-girl-gets-stuck-DRAIN-removing-metal-cover-try-retrieve-iPhone-feet.html#ixzz2xv1SltiI 

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