A number of employees like, Ann-Catherine Liska, have opted for the traditional pass for now.
'I don't feel that its necessary for opening doors or connecting with machines.' Ms Liska said.
Hannes Sjoblad, one of the tiny RFID (radio-frequency identification) chip developers, said they could be part of all future workplaces.
"We already interact with technology all the time. Today it's a bit messy - we need pin codes and passwords. Wouldn't it be easy to just touch with your hand? That's really intuitive."' Mr Sjoblad said.
He said its launch at the Sime office in Stockholm will provide more research into the technology.
"We want to be able to understand this technology before big corporates and big government come to us and say everyone should get chipped - the tax authority chip, the Google or Facebook chip." Mr Sjoblad said.

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"Employee, Elicico De Costa, decided to get one and hasn't looked back since.
'It can contain contact details. I think it can do a lot of other stuff in the future.' Mr De Costa said.
It's expected the chip will eventually enable staff to log on to computers or pay for food in the cafe.
But the new pass is still having teething problems, with some staff reporting their chips don't always work.
A number of employees like, Ann-Catherine Liska, have opted for the traditional pass for now.
'I don't feel that its necessary for opening doors or connecting with machines.' Ms Liska said.
Hannes Sjoblad, one of the tiny RFID (radio-frequency identification) chip developers, said they could be part of all future workplaces.
"We already interact with technology all the time. Today it's a bit messy - we need pin codes and passwords. Wouldn't it be easy to just touch with your hand? That's really intuitive."' Mr Sjoblad said.
He said its launch at the Sime office in Stockholm will provide more research into the technology.
"We want to be able to understand this technology before big corporates and big government come to us and say everyone should get chipped - the tax authority chip, the Google or Facebook chip." Mr Sjoblad said."

Workers at a new high-technology office building in central Stockholm are doing away with their old ID cards on lanyards, and can now open doors with the swipe of a hand — thanks to a microchip implanted in the body.

The radio-frequency identificatio (RFID) chips are about 12 mm long and injected with a syringe. 

"It's an identification tool that can communicate with objects around you,"  said Patrick Mesterton, CEO of the building, Epicenter Office.

"You can open doors using your chip. You can do secure printing from our printers with the chip, but you can also communicate with your mobile phone, by sending your business card to individuals that you meet," he said.

Mesterton thinks some of the future uses for implanted chips will be any application that currently requires a pin code, a key or a card, such as payments.

"I think also for health-care reasons ... you can sort of communicate with your doctor and you get can data on what you eat and what your physical status is," Mesterton said.

"You have your own identification code and you're sending that to something else which you have to grant access to. So there's no one else that can sort of follow you on your ID, so to say. It's you who decides who gets access to that ID," he said.

The implant program is voluntary for the workers in the office complex.

"It felt pretty scary, but at the same time it felt very modern, very 2015," said Lin Kowalska shortly after she had a microchip implanted in her hand.

Have you ever lost or left your work pass at home? Well, the Swedes have a solution. Get microchipped.

A new office block in Sweden is offering workers the chance to have a microchip implanted under their skin to allow them to access to various services within the building.

A tiny gadget the size of a grain of rice is implanted in employees hands.

It then allows them to open doors, or use the printer, without a traditional pass card.

The microchip implants are optional.

Employee, Elicico De Costa, decided to get one and hasn't looked back since.

'It can contain contact details. I think it can do a lot of other stuff in the future.' Mr De Costa said.

It's expected the chip will eventually enable staff to log on to computers or pay for food in the cafe.

But the new pass is still having teething problems, with some staff reporting their chips don't always work.

A number of employees like, Ann-Catherine Liska, have opted for the traditional pass for now.

'I don't feel that its necessary for opening doors or connecting with machines.' Ms Liska said.

Hannes Sjoblad, one of the tiny RFID (radio-frequency identification) chip developers, said they could be part of all future workplaces.

"We already interact with technology all the time. Today it's a bit messy - we need pin codes and passwords. Wouldn't it be easy to just touch with your hand? That's really intuitive."' Mr Sjoblad said.

He said its launch at the Sime office in Stockholm will provide more research into the technology.

"We want to be able to understand this technology before big corporates and big government come to us and say everyone should get chipped - the tax authority chip, the Google or Facebook chip." Mr Sjoblad said.

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Posted
AuthorKatina Michael

Like any survival-centered human, I let technology pull me along to nirvana.

Why, I now have an iPhone 6. Though I confess that when I took one look at Google Glass, I was reluctant to take two looks at Google Glass.

I'm not sure, though, that I would ever allow electronics to be -- how may I put this? -- inserted inside me. Permanently, that is.

Yet this is what one Swedish woman has done to make her obviously difficult life less onerous. As Sweden's the Local reports, 25-year-old Emilott Lantz from Umeå has a vast existential problem. She really doesn't like carrying keys around.

So she found a completely forward-thinking solution: she had a rice grain-sized microchip inserted in her hand last week.

Some people's instincts will undoubtedly tell them that only those with a brain the size of a rice grain would do such a thing. 

But Lantz, who works for IT consultancy firm Codemill, believes such people may have limited imaginations. She told the Local: "I don't feel as though this is the future. This is the present. To me, it's weird that we haven't seen this sooner."

In one sense, she is right. If there are people prepared to walk around in cyborgian glasses or talk to their watches, at least a microchip shows discretion.

And she's not the only one to let this particular tech get under her skin. She attended the Sime tech conference in Stockholm, where participants were offered the procedure for free. Around 50 members of a Swedish biohackers group called BioNyfiken had the same procedure done in the past month, according to the Local report.

The handchip technology works in a very simple manner: you place your hand against a scanner and you're either admitted or your hand begins to glow, then it burns until it falls off. (That sanction was my own futuristic fantasy.)

Lantz seems to feel a frisson at the idea that she will be able to walk through her office door without having to remember keys or a passcode. She told the Local: "I'm super stoked to have had this done. I can't wait for the property agent to get back to me about letting me into the system so that I can use my chip instead of my keys to get into the office."

I suspect she's quite a character.

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A Swedish office block is offering workers the opportunity to have a microchip implanted under the skin of their hands. The radio frequency identification (RFID) chip, about the size of a grain of rice, lets users open doors, swap contact details or use the photocopier, all at the wave of a hand. Matthew Stock reports.

Summary: Forget wearable technology, Swedish office worker Lin Kowalska is having it implanted under her skin. A microchip - about the size of a grain of rice - is injected into her hand. (SOUNDBITE) (English) LIN KOWALSKA, OFFICE WORKER FROM COMPANY "GIVESOME", SAYING: "It felt pretty scary, but at the same time it felt very modern, very 2015." Instead of ID cards or passcodes, workers who sign up for the implant can now open doors with the wave of a hand. The chip also currently lets workers swap contact details via a smartphone and operate a photocopier. Patrick Mesterton, co-founder of the Epicenter tech hub in central Stockholm, sees plenty of future applications for the implant. (SOUNDBITE) (English) PATRICK MESTERTON, CO-FOUNDER AND CEO OF EPICENTER OFFICE, SAYING: "Some of the future areas of use I think, like anything today where you would use a pin code or a key or a card, so payments I think is one area. I think also for health care reasons that you can sort of communicate with your doctor and you can data on what you eat and what your physical status is." The radio-frequency identification chip is made from pyrex glass and contains an antenna and microchip, with no need for batteries While some workers may feel uneasy at the prospect of literally taking their work home with them, the designers say the chip is completely safe and secure. (SOUNDBITE) (English) PATRICK MESTERTON, CO-FOUNDER AND CEO OF EPICENTER OFFICE, SAYING: "You have your own identification code and you're sending that to something else which you have to grant access to, so there's no one else that can sort of follow you on your ID so to say. It's you who decides who gets access to that ID." The chip is in no way mandatory, and the limited benefits the implant currently offers may put many people off. But with wearable tech becoming more ubiquitous, the merging of biology and technology could represent a growing trend.

It is with great joy that MG and I write to let you know that the Uberveillance edited volume is finally in stores and available for purchase. We encourage you to ask your libraries to purchase the volume. Of significance are the coming together of well-known voices in the surveillance field to discuss the definition and impact of uberveillance, including Katherine Albrecht, Roger Clarke, Mark Gasson, Kevin Haggerty, Steve Mann, Ellen McGee, Kevin Warwick, Marcus Wigan and numerous authorities on the topic of microchipping people. This volume contains 17 book chapters, and 7 interviews and panel presentations as well as full referencing of source materials in some 500 pages.

"Uberveillance" edited volume by Michael and Michael (2014)

"Uberveillance" edited volume by Michael and Michael (2014)

 

CONTENTS PAGE

PART A The Veillances

Chapter 1 Introduction: On the “Birth” of Uberveillance  (pages 1-31) M. G. Michael (University of Wollongong, Australia)

Chapter 2 Veillance: Beyond Surveillance, Dataveillance, Uberveillance, and the Hypocrisy of One-Sided Watching  (pages 32-45) Steve Mann (University of Toronto, Canada)

Chapter 3 Uberveillance: Where Wear and Educative Arrangement  (pages 46-62) Alexander Hayes (University of Wollongong, Australia)

PART B Applications of Humancentric Implantables

Chapter 4 Practical Experimentation with Human Implants  (pages 64-132) Kevin Warwick (University of Reading, UK), Mark N. Gasson (University of Reading, UK)

Chapter 5 Knowledge Recovery: Applications of Technology and Memory  (pages 133-142) Maria E. Burke (University of Salford, UK), Chris Speed (University of Edinburgh, UK)

PART C Adoption of RFID Implants for Humans

Chapter 6 Willingness to Adopt RFID Implants: Do Personality Factors Play a Role in the Acceptance of Uberveillance?  (pages 144-168) Christine Perakslis (Johnson and Wales University, USA)

Chapter 7 Surveilling the Elderly: Emerging Demographic Needs and Social Implications of RFID Chip Technology Use  (pages 169-185) Randy Basham (University of Texas – Arlington, USA)

PART D Tracking and Tracing Laws, Directives, Regulations, and Standards

Chapter 8 Towards the Blanket Coverage DNA Profiling and Sampling of Citizens in England, Wales, and Northern Ireland  (pages 187-207) Katina Michael (University of Wollongong, Australia)

Chapter 9 ID Scanners and Überveillance in the Night-Time Economy: Crime Prevention or Invasion of Privacy?  (pages 208-225) Darren Palmer (Deakin University, Australia), Ian Warren (Deakin University, Australia), Peter Miller (Deakin University, Australia)

Chapter 10 Global Tracking Systems in the Australian Interstate Trucking Industry  (pages 226-234) Jann Karp (C.C.C. Australia, Australia)

Chapter 11 Tracking Legislative Developments in Relation to “Do Not Track” Initiatives  (pages 235-259) Brigette Garbin (University of Queensland, Australia), Kelly Staunton (University of Queensland, Australia), Mark Burdon (University of Queensland, Australia)

Chapter 12 Uberveillance, Standards, and Anticipation: A Case Study on Nanobiosensors in U.S. Cattle  (pages 260-279) Kyle Powys Whyte (Michigan State University, USA), Monica List (Michigan State University, USA), John V. Stone (Michigan State University, USA), Daniel Grooms (Michigan State University, USA), Stephen Gasteyer (Michigan State University, USA), Paul B. Thompson (Michigan State University, USA), Lawrence Busch (Michigan State University, USA), Daniel Buskirk (Michigan State University, USA), Erica Giorda (Michigan State University, USA), Hilda Bouri (Michigan State University, USA)

PART E Health Implications of Microchipping Living Things

Chapter 13 Microchip-Induced Tumors in Laboratory Rodents and Dogs: A Review of the Literature 1990–2006  (pages 281-317) Katherine Albrecht (CASPIAN Consumer Privacy, USA)

PART F Socio-Ethical Implications of RFID Tags and Transponders

Chapter 14 Privacy and Pervasive Surveillance: A Philosophical Analysis  (pages 319-350) Alan Rubel (University of Wisconsin – Madison, USA)

Chapter 15 Neuroethics and Implanted Brain Machine Interfaces  (pages 351-365) Ellen M. McGee (Independent Researcher, USA)

Chapter 16 We Are the Borg! Human Assimilation into Cellular Society  (pages 366-407) Ronnie D. Lipschutz (University of California - Santa Cruz, USA), Rebecca J. Hester (University of Texas Medical Branch, USA)

Chapter 17 Uberveillance and Faith-Based Organizations: A Renewed Moral Imperative  (pages 408-416) Marcus Wigan (Oxford Systematics, Australia & Edinburgh Napier University, UK)

Acronyms and Abbreviations

Compilation of References

About the Contributors

Index

EDITORIAL ADVISORY BOARD

Roba Abbas, University of Wollongong, Australia

Greg Adamson, University of Melbourne, Australia

Katherine Albrecht, CASPIAN, USA

Anas Aloudat, University of Jordan, Jordan

Michael V. Arnold, University of Melbourne, Australia

Emilia Belleboni, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Spain

Rafael Capurro, University of Wisconsin – Milwaukee, USA

Kenneth Foster, University of Pennsylvania, USA

Amal Graafstra, Amal.net, USA

Mireille Hildebrandt, Erasmus University Rotterdam, The Netherlands

Peter Hyland, University of Wollongong, Australia

Nicholas Huber, Accenture, Australia

Indrawati, Institut Manajemen Telkom, Indonesia

Eleni Kosta, K. U. Leuven, Belgium

Ronald Leenes, Tilburg University, The Netherlands

Avner Levin, Ryerson University, Canada

Michael Loui, University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign, USA

Noëmi Manders-Huits, Delft University of Technology, The Netherlands

Keith W. Miller, University of Missouri – St. Louis, USA

Lyria Bennett Moses, University of New South Wales, Australia

Christine Perakslis, Johnson and Wales University, USA

Laura Perusco, Macquarie Bank, UK

Kenneth Pimple, Indiana University – Bloomington, USA

Joseph Savirimuthu, University of Liverpool, UK

Alan D. Smith, Robert Morris University, USA

Charles Smith, Mesa State College Alumni, USA

Judith Symonds, Auckland University of Technology, New Zealand

Samuel Fosso Wamba, Rouen Business School, France

John Weckert, Charles Sturt University, Australia

 

HOW TO CITE THE VOLUME

MLA Style

Michael, M.G. and Katina Michael. "Uberveillance and the Social Implications of Microchip Implants: Emerging Technologies." IGI Global, 2014. 1-509. Web. 24 Dec. 2013. doi:10.4018/978-1-4666-4582-0

APA Style

Michael, M., & Michael, K. (2014). Uberveillance and the Social Implications of Microchip Implants: Emerging Technologies (pp. 1-509). Hershey, PA: IGI Global. doi:10.4018/978-1-4666-4582-0

Chicago Style

Michael, M.G. and Katina Michael. "Uberveillance and the Social Implications of Microchip Implants: Emerging Technologies." 1-509 (2014), accessed December 24, 2013. doi:10.4018/978-1-4666-4582-0

"A Liberal Party candidate proposed a radical new policing system in which criminal suspects would be injected with satellite-trackable microchips shot from a ''high powered sniper rifle''.

Ray King, who is contesting the western Sydney electorate of McMahon, was behind the idea, which he claimed would improve productivity of the NSW Police Force.

...

In 2011, Mr King outlined his ideas in a 12-page essay, Microchipping of human subjects as a productivity enhancement and as a strategic management direction of NSW Police.

The paper was submitted to a police leadership conference shortly before he was promoted from Cabramatta to Liverpool.

''What has limited our effectiveness for decades has been the restriction on how police obtain information and having to prove before courts that we have acquired our information by legitimate means,'' he wrote.

''What I propose and will endeavour to convince the reader of, is the implementation of microchip technology similar to that used in controlling the activity of domestic animals, will quantifiably enhance the success of law enforcement.''

The most controversial part of Mr King's plan was the means by which microchips would be inserted into the body. He named Danish company Empire North as having patented the ''ID Sniper Rifle'' as the ''long-distance injector'' of the microchip." 

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