Over a four-year period, the FBI authorized informants to break the law more than 22,800 times, according to newly reviewed documents.

Official records obtained by the Daily Dot under the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) show the Federal Bureau of Investigation gave informants permission at least 5,649 times in 2013 to engage in activity that would otherwise be considered a crime. In 2014, authorization was given 5,577 times, the records show.

Those crimes can have serious and unintended consequences. For example, a Daily Dot investigation found that an FBI informant was responsible for facilitating the 2011 breach of Stratfor in one of the most high-profile cyberattacks of the last decade. While a handful of informants ultimately brought down the principal hacker responsible, the sting also caused Stratfor, an American intelligence firm, millions of dollars in damages and left an estimated 700,000 credit card holders vulnerable to fraud.
Source: http://www.dailydot.com/layer8/fbi-informa...
Posted
AuthorJordan Brown

Axon creates connected technologies for truth in public safety.

"....TASER and Microsoft have formed a unique partnership that brings together two powerful technology platforms to meet the unique needs of law enforcement today. With unmatched technology innovation and industry-leading security, the partnership is enabling transformation in public safety practices while also promoting greater transparency and trust between law enforcement and private citizens."

Read more

This man knows a lot about what is happening in this area - https://ccj.asu.edu/content/michael-white

A great summation of uberveillance in relation to FitBit-style trackers by Richard Chirgwin of The Register. Article here 

Thank you David Vaile of UNSW's Cyberspace Law and Policy Centre for including Uberveillance in your subject outline in week 2 and corresponding presentation slides for LAWS3532. Additionally, for the guest lecture on COMP4920 Management and Ethics at UNSW, entitled "Legal and ethical perspectives on software development and liability".

Image sources: http://www.cyberlawcentre.org/it_ethics_and_law/uberveillance_v2.pdf

This is what it might be like living in an uberveillance society.

New York Times, 2004

New York Times, 2004

Image - (c) Brian Carpani / flickr

Image - (c) Brian Carpani / flickr

The following document was originally published here - http://goo.gl/wi994a


CONTACT WITH LAW ENFORCEMENT

Tips on what to do during contact with a law enforcement officer while playing Ingress

Its important to consider the possibility of coming into contact with the police. After all, Ingress calls for a certain type of late night rendezvous with other players or portals. As this game is geared for the techies in our community, not everyone is aware of the game. In addition, there are people that may be aware of it, but do not know your intentions and may call a law enforcement agency to report your suspicious behavior. Below you will find some useful information to help you should you encounter an officer of the law while on your conquest to save humanity one way or another. This is not legal advice, only a suggestion. The author of this document nor the organizations & individuals that post/share this document are not responsible for your actions.

 

    If you are in your vehicle:

  • Shut off the engine if it`s running

    • This will show your intention of not running from them

  • Turn on your interior light

    • This allows them to see in your vehicle better

  • Do not move after you put your hands on the steering wheel

    • Don't reach for your DL or ID, if they want it, they will ask

 

If you are not in your vehicle:

  • Keep your hands out of your pockets

    • Don't make any sudden movements, and keep your hands down

  • Keep your distance, the officer will move as close as they feel comfortable

    • Stay still and don't back up or move around

 

    General things for both situations:

  • Explain slowly what you are doing in a light and meaningful manner

    • Don't be rude, condescending or evasive in your answers

  • Stay calm, and don't worry

    • If you are not doing anything wrong, you won't be in trouble!

  • Comply with all requests and orders

    • Don't move for your ID or anything until asked. Advise the officer of where it’s at before moving to grab it

  • If you are carrying a firearm, declare it immediately in a polite manner!

    • Also advise the officer if you have a valid CCW Permit on you

 

Keep in mind, whoever called you into the police may have embellished your actions to hasten their response time. With that knowledge, it’s expected that the officers responding will have no idea about what is really going on. All they are told is someone is where they normally shouldn’t be, and doing something that they are not supposed to be doing. When the officer arrives, s/he will ask a lot of questions to get the story of what is actually taking place - so be patient and answer the questions without getting irritated and upset. Staying calm and not making any sudden movements will keep the tension down between both you and the officers, and prevent anything bad from happening.

 

It’s also a good idea to familiarize yourself with any local laws and ordinances. Keep in mind, most city and state parks close at dusk - regardless if there is a gate blocking entrance to the parking lot. If someone asks you to leave, comply with the request. If they are an agent of the property you are on, they have the final word. The same rule applies for firearms - they ask you to leave or put it away, you must comply!

Here are some local laws and ordinances to familiarize yourself with. This is only a listing to find information and should not be construed as legal advice - always consult your attorney (this applies to the entire document as well).

 

Title 13 of the Arizona Revised Statutes is the section for the criminal code. The big laws to remember while playing Ingress relate to trespassing and criminal damage (if you damage anything):

 

 


The original founding article was produced and accessible from Brian Wassom's website:

"...I recently stumbled across this post from a Kansas law enforcement lobbyist, originally posted in January 2014. It purports to describe “a number” of 911 calls in Park City about “suspicious persons” who turned out to be playing the augmented reality game Ingress. The article also cites one of my blog posts as an example of what “can go wrong” when Ingress players cross paths with police, and suggests that readers Google the phrase “ingress police calls” to find more. - See more at: http://www.wassom.com/ingress-ar-game-impacting-kansas-law-enforcement.html#sthash.4rB2Ub7R.dpuf

Killer Robots

"...Over the past decade, the expanded use of unmanned armed vehicles has dramatically changed warfare, bringing new humanitarian and legal challenges. Now rapid advances in technology are resulting in efforts to develop fully autonomous weapons. These robotic weapons would be able to choose and fire on targets on their own, without any human intervention. This capability would pose a fundamental challenge to the protection of civilians and to compliance with international human rights and humanitarian law."

Read more

"...Google Glass makes it easy for wearers to surreptitiously take pictures or video of unknowing subjects. That's caused more than a few people to ask: What does Glass mean for our privacy? Now Congress, too, wants answers."

For the full article visit here

Posted
AuthorKatina Michael
Prescott flies drone onto oncoming train on the Sydney Harbour Bridge on October 3, 2013.

Prescott flies drone onto oncoming train on the Sydney Harbour Bridge on October 3, 2013.

Watch more here in this Brisbane Times news clipping.