'“…The U.S. military’s top intelligence officer is increasingly worried about China’s research into “human performance enhancement,” including efforts to merge human and machine intelligence. It’s a “key area” of disruptive technology that will affect national security, Lt. Gen. Robert Ashley, the director of the Defense Intelligence Agency, or DIA, told an audience at the Association of the U.S.Army’s annual conference this week.” - read more at Defence One

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Authoralexanderhayes

"A shadowy international mercenary and security firm known as TigerSwan targeted the movement opposed to the Dakota Access Pipeline with military-style counterterrorism measures, collaborating closely with police in at least five states, according to internal documents obtained by The Intercept. The documents provide the first detailed picture of how TigerSwan, which originated as a U.S. military and State Department contractor helping to execute the global war on terror, worked at the behest of its client Energy Transfer Partners, the company building the Dakota Access Pipeline, to respond to the indigenous-led movement that sought to stop the project.

TigerSwan spearheaded a multifaceted private security operation characterized by sweeping and invasive surveillance of protesters.

Activists on the ground were tracked by a Dakota Access helicopter that provided live video coverage to their observers in police agencies, according to an October 12 email thread that included officers from the FBI, DHS, BIA, state, and local police. In one email, National Security Intelligence Specialist Terry Van Horn of the U.S. attorney’s office acknowledged his direct access to the helicopter video feed, which was tracking protesters’ movements during a demonstration. “Watching a live feed from DAPL Helicopter, pending arrival at site(s),” he wrote. Cecily Fong, a spokesperson for law enforcement throughout the protests, acknowledged that an operations center in Bismarck had access to the feed, stating in an email to The Intercept that “the video was provided as a courtesy so we had eyes on the situation.”

Source: https://theintercept.com/2017/05/27/leaked...
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"The father of a man fatally shot by police at an Ohio Wal-Mart says a phone call in which he heard his son's dying breaths keeps replaying in his head.

John Crawford III, was shot August 5, in a Wal-Mart. A 911 caller told police that Crawford III was waving a weapon that turned out to be an air rifle.

Officers have said Crawford III was shot when he didn't respond to orders to put the gun down.

His father, John Crawford Jr, talked about the last day of son's life to The Cincinnati Enquirer.

The Crawford family and their attorney have said that a section of store surveillance video they saw shows Crawford III holding the air rifle and talking on his mobile phone.

The family has requested public release of the store video. But Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine has refused to release it while the investigation is continuing."

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"A man walks through Wal-Mart, holding something to his ear as he passes a gun case.

He leans toward a shelf and steps back into view, now holding a long, dark object — a gun? — as he walks past customers, who show no obvious reaction.

Eight minutes later, surveillance video from a different angle shows him farther away.

Suddenly he drops the object and crumples to the floor. Two more people come into view, walking toward him with firearms drawn.

Was it a justified fatal shooting by police or an unreasonable use of force? Does the soundless video offer enough information to answer that question?

In the Wal-Mart case and others, cameras meant to help catch bad guys or document police actions are drawing attention for capturing officers using force.

The public circulation of those images increases transparency, but it also adds the risk of viewers rushing to judgment based on only part of the story.

"You might see a video and think that because you're seeing an actual sort of account of what happened, you know the whole story.

And it's very rare that a video is actually going to be able to tell the whole story," said Ric Simmons, an Ohio State University professor of criminal law.

At that Wal-Mart in Beavercreek, outside Dayton, 22-year-old John Crawford III was talking on a cellphone and picked up an air rifle on August 5.

A 911 caller reported seeing someone waving a gun and pointing it at people. Police said Crawford was shot when he didn't respond to officers' orders to drop the weapon, something the video can't prove because there's no audio.

Crawford's relatives and their attorneys say he was "shot on sight" with no chance to respond and that the video proves the shooting was unreasonable.

A grand jury concluded it was justified. A federal investigation is pending.

Sometimes a video instantly offers incriminating evidence. In South Carolina this month, a state trooper was fired and charged with assault after his dashboard video, with audio, showed an unarmed driver being shot in the hip."

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This is what it might be like living in an uberveillance society.

New York Times, 2004

New York Times, 2004


Image: Tinke

"...The use of reflective technology raised a critical challenge where natural light enters through a person's fingernail and is detected by the light detector. In order to ensure an accurate measurement is made, Tinké is packed with a comprehensive set of signal processing algorithms designed to treat the signals detected and filter all background signals.* "

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"A study of over 4000 people carried out by the Centre of Creative and Social Technologies (CAST) at Goldsmiths University, revealed that one in five Britons were uncomfortable with the privacy implications surrounding the Google Glass – and believe that it should be banned outright. The research paper, The Human Cloud: Wearable Technology from Novelty to Productivity, found that around half of respondents expressed a general mistrust about the invasive nature of wearable technologies such as Google Glass and Nike +, citing concerns for privacy as well as calling for possible regulation over such smart objects. However, the survey did find a general openness towards the forthcoming explosion of cloud-powered devices, with around 71% of people expressing the enhancement that such innovations had allowed in regards to their health, intelligence, confidence, relationships, as well as many other aspects of their lives.
Google have already started to regulate usage of the Glass, recently banning pornography applications as well as facial recognition technologies that are believed to be a breach of privacy. However, the development of applications has persisted in the face of Google’s attempts to tame the behemoth that the Glass has become. The increased interest and openess of those studied in CAST’s survey for wearable tech will lead to what has been dubbed The Human Cloud: the term created for the network of humans equipped with wearable internet-connected technologies. The title alone certainly evokes an eerie progression towards the Singularity, but for the mean time, Chris Bauer co-director of CAST, comments that “The rich data created by wearable tech will drive the rise of the ‘human cloud’ of personal data. With this comes countless opportunities to tap into this data; whether it’s connecting with third parties to provide more tailored and personalised services or working closer with healthcare institutions to get a better understanding of their patients. We’re already seeing wearable technology being used in the private sector with health insurance firms encouraging members to use wearable fitness devices to earn rewards for maintaining a healthier lifestyle. It is likely that the public sector will look to capitalise on the wearable technology trend with a view to boosting telehealth and smart city programs.” Applications of the human cloud will serve only to enhance almost all aspects of our daily life, assimilating and collecting information in a much more efficient manner than ever before."
 

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