Fig. 1. Theoretical CAN model of acceptance of  insideables .

Fig. 1. Theoretical CAN model of acceptance of insideables.

Society has already accepted the use of physical implants that increase an individual's seductive power as well as technological implants that correct physical disabilities. Various companies are currently developing technological implants to increase the innate capacity of the human body (insideables) (e.g., memory implants). Public acceptance of this new technology has not yet been investigated in academic research, where studies have instead focused on the ethical and evolutionary implications of insideables. The main aim of this study is the development of a model, namely the Cognitive-Affective-Normative (CAN) model, for assessing the acceptance of new types of technological products. The CAN model combines the cognitive variables perceived usefulness and perceived ease of use, as well as the normative variable subjective (or social) norm, from the TAM models with the affective variables positive emotionsnegative emotions and anxiety. The CAN model was tested on a sample of 600 randomly selected individuals through structural equation modeling. Data were obtained from a self-administered, online survey. The proposed model explains 73.92% of the intention to use the technological product in the very early stages of its adoption, that is, its early acceptance. Affective and normative factors have the greatest influence on the acceptance of a new technology; within the affective dimension, positive emotions have the greatest impact. Any technology acceptance model should thus consider the emotions that the new technology produces, as well as the influence of the social norm. - Read more at https://doi.org/10.1016/j.chb.2016.12.063

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Authoralexanderhayes
Categoriesinsideables
Wearable and ingestible sensors are revolutionising the health monitoring space as the demand for quality healthcare continues to rise. Emphasis on preventive health has led to the development of prognostic sensors for applications in the medical industry. This, in turn, has led to a shift in the healthcare business model from a diagnostic one to more prognostic and preventive health and wellness. 
 
Sensor adoption is crucial to this evolution, facilitating advanced diagnostics, treatment and patient monitoring. Wearable and implantable biosensors will emerge as the key enablers for device innovation.
“The Internet of Medical Things will lead to sensors playing a greater role in offering connected healthcare infrastructure,” said Measurement and Instrumentation Industry Principal Dr. Rajender Thusu. “However, there are no clear policies or standardisations yet that companies can adhere to while implementing the connected health platform. The greatest challenge, therefore, lies in bringing together different applications under the same working platform, when individual solutions lack interoperability.”
medical body area network (MBAN)
Posted by: Margaret Rouse
An MBAN (pronounced M-ban) is a medical body area network (BAN) composed of low-power wearable or implanted wireless medical devices. 
Wearable devices are typically low-cost, disposable sensors that stick to the body and free the patient from being being physically tethered to monitoring devices. Embedded devices may be sensors that are swallowed for short-term monitoring or placed in the body during surgery to monitor physical parameters during and after the healing process.
The sensors transmit patient data wirelessly to a control device located either on the patient’s body or in close proximity to it. The control device, which functions as a message broker, forwards data from the sensors to a workstation in real time over a wireless local area network (WLAN).  
What kind of devices can you expect to see gaining momentum? Think Fitbits and Apple Watches that can read your heart rate, activity levels, and sleep cycles. Google is even developing contact lenses that can read your glucose levels. mc10 is coming out with a biometric stamp the size of a band-aid that can report a person’s vitals to connected devices and doctors. Developers at the University of Buffalo are creating a pendant that can analyze chewing and swallowing sounds to determine what wearers are eating and alert them when they’ve started to overeat or eat unhealthily.
While these devices may be helpful for those hoping to maintain good health, Ian Shakil notes that it’s important to realize that these devices are only able to provide so much assistance.
“The Internet of Medical Things will continue to evolve and deliver value by getting the complexities of technology out of the way and connecting- or better yet, reconnecting- doctors with patients,” said Shakil, CEO of Audmedix.
“Augmendix’s service is optimally designed to deliver the highest quality patient notes resulting in improved patient care and pay or reimbursement,” he explained.
Shakil’s company estimates that physicians spend at least 70 percent of their time reading documentation before they started sing their service. “This new ly reclaimed time that can be repurposed in-clinic for other administrative tasks or even to see more patients,” he explained.

Source: http://moveboulder.org/the-internet-of-things-in-the-world-of-medicine/

A few months ago, a Swedish company gained international headlines after launching an internal program under which staff were encouraged to have themselves implanted with security micro-chips.

Now, in a sign the technology is catching on, Sweden's state-run public transport provider "SJ" has got in on the action.

It's now allowing commuters to travel on its trains with just a wave of their hand.

Featured:

Stephen Ray, spokesman for Sweden's Rail Provider SJ
Lina Edstrom, spokeswoman for Sweden's Rail Provider SJ
Ben Libberton, microbiologist, Karolinska Institute

Source: http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-06-12/swedens-state-rail-provider-waves-through/8611244

"MANILA, Philippines – The next big thing in computing could be a glass-encased chip embedded under the skin of your left hand.

Think of it as an extension of the wearables that can track your movement, your sleep, your heart and pulse rate now. Chip implants can do so much more.

In its early stages today, it can store data that can be read by Near Field Communication (NFC) readers. Technically speaking you can open your door, your car just by scanning your hand in the NFC reader. It can serve as your key or access pass to the gym, the library, the office, or wherever is it that requires identification.

If you think that chips embedded in the human body can turn you into a cyborg, fear not because the reality is less frightening than that, according to Hanness Sjoblad, Chief Disruption Officer and Founder, BioNyfiken.

In a presentation entitled “Chirping Humans: The Internet of Things Becomes the Internet of Us,” at the Kaspersky Lab APAC Cyber Security Summit in Malaysia recently, Sjöblad, along with Rainer Bock and Sergey Lozhkin of Kaspersky Lab, explained that while still a rarity (only around 10,000 people around the world have chips implanted in their hand), it is fast gaining attention, especially in Europe and the US.

The use cases are built around the ease and convenience of not having to carry around too many things in your wallet or your handbag. Just scan your hand and you’re good to go.

Sjoblad said there were many interface moments in computing history that made human interaction with computers a lot simpler. Using computers before Windows, for example, is an absolute pain. It’s the same way with using the Internet before the Web browsers. Windows and Web browsers are only some of the landmarks in computer interfaces that have made it very easy for people to interact with computers.

“My personal take is that implants represent a similar interface moment between humans and technology because of the rise of the Internet of Things (IoT),” Sjoblad said. “Our world will be filled with connected things. If you have a smart device in your hand you have automatic way to interact with technology.”

Defined as the network of physical objects embedded with software, sensors and connectivity, IoT is indeed growing rapidly. Juniper Research recently reported  that the number of IoT connected devices is on track to reach 13.4 billion this year and is expected to rise to 38.5 billion by 2020. These connected things have varied applications in retail, agriculture, smart buildings and smart grid applications, to name only a few."

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