"Second to the contact lenses that monitor for diabetes, Google's parent company Alphabet has filed a patent which takes their development to another level. The patent specifically covers a method for "injecting a fluid into a lens capsule of an eye, wherein a natural lens of the eye has been removed from the lens capsule." It's powered by "radio frequency energy" received by a small antenna inside. The gadget even has its own data storage. Forbes reports, it is designed to "improve vision."

Samsung is also one of the most recent companies to receive a patent for smart contact lenses. Their lenses are for "experimenting with new methods of delivering augmented reality interfaces and data."

"MANILA, Philippines – The next big thing in computing could be a glass-encased chip embedded under the skin of your left hand.

Think of it as an extension of the wearables that can track your movement, your sleep, your heart and pulse rate now. Chip implants can do so much more.

In its early stages today, it can store data that can be read by Near Field Communication (NFC) readers. Technically speaking you can open your door, your car just by scanning your hand in the NFC reader. It can serve as your key or access pass to the gym, the library, the office, or wherever is it that requires identification.

If you think that chips embedded in the human body can turn you into a cyborg, fear not because the reality is less frightening than that, according to Hanness Sjoblad, Chief Disruption Officer and Founder, BioNyfiken.

In a presentation entitled “Chirping Humans: The Internet of Things Becomes the Internet of Us,” at the Kaspersky Lab APAC Cyber Security Summit in Malaysia recently, Sjöblad, along with Rainer Bock and Sergey Lozhkin of Kaspersky Lab, explained that while still a rarity (only around 10,000 people around the world have chips implanted in their hand), it is fast gaining attention, especially in Europe and the US.

The use cases are built around the ease and convenience of not having to carry around too many things in your wallet or your handbag. Just scan your hand and you’re good to go.

Sjoblad said there were many interface moments in computing history that made human interaction with computers a lot simpler. Using computers before Windows, for example, is an absolute pain. It’s the same way with using the Internet before the Web browsers. Windows and Web browsers are only some of the landmarks in computer interfaces that have made it very easy for people to interact with computers.

“My personal take is that implants represent a similar interface moment between humans and technology because of the rise of the Internet of Things (IoT),” Sjoblad said. “Our world will be filled with connected things. If you have a smart device in your hand you have automatic way to interact with technology.”

Defined as the network of physical objects embedded with software, sensors and connectivity, IoT is indeed growing rapidly. Juniper Research recently reported  that the number of IoT connected devices is on track to reach 13.4 billion this year and is expected to rise to 38.5 billion by 2020. These connected things have varied applications in retail, agriculture, smart buildings and smart grid applications, to name only a few."

More here

Punching in security codes to deactivate the alarm at his store became a thing of the past for Jowan Oesterlund when he implanted a chip into his hand about 18 months ago. 
"When I walk into my studio, I just wave my hand at the alarm, and the alarm turns off," the tattoo artist said. 
"Whenever someone shows up with security clearance, he will wave and the alarm is deactivated, the lights are turned on... it will start up the computer, the cash machine and so on," he added.
Oesterlund is one of the small but growing number of people around the world who has a grain-sized NFC (Near Field Communications) chip embedded in him. 
In fact, so convinced is he that "this is the future" that he has two of them, one in his hand and the other in his arm. 
"One year ago it was 'that's just stupid', or 'wow that's just awesome'. But now multinational companies are looking into it," he said, pointing to cybersecurity firm Kaspersky as an example.
The renowned cybersecurity company had brought in Oesterlund to carry out a live demonstration of chip implantation at the IFA consumer electronics fair in Berlin which opens to the public Friday.
The nervous volunteer is Rainer Bock, who works at Kaspersky. After Oesterlund used a needle to put a chip under Bock's skin, the new member of the "cyborg" club said: "It didn't hurt." 
Curiosity a factor
With a memory of just 880 bytes, the chips are far from the science fiction equivalent of data powerhouses carrying billions of encrypted secret documents. 
Rather, they tend to have specific functions, such as unlocking a door or hooking up to an app on a smartphone. 
Despite the limited uses, human chip implant manufacturer Dangerous Things told AFP that there are now around 10,000 "cyborgs" -- or humans with digital chips in them -- across the globe.
The phenomenon is not new, with a club in Barcelona offering such implants to its members as early as 2004, allowing them to gain entrance and pay for their drinks with it.
But its popularity has now accelerated with the ubiquity of smartphones, which can communicate with the chips.
Those who have done the procedure admit that for now, novelty is its key draw. 
Evgeny Chereshnev, who also works for Kaspersky, got his chip about seven months ago.
"It felt weird for a couple of weeks... Then I started to understand that I've forgotten what it is to carry a badge to work, I've forgotten what it means to open a door with a key," he said, describing how with a simple wave of his hand, he now enters a secure office building without punching in codes or tapping a security card at the entrance. 
But such implants are not without risks, warns Kaspersky's European research director Marco Preuss, saying that a smartphone placed close to the chip for instance, could easily pick up data.

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A number of employees like, Ann-Catherine Liska, have opted for the traditional pass for now.
'I don't feel that its necessary for opening doors or connecting with machines.' Ms Liska said.
Hannes Sjoblad, one of the tiny RFID (radio-frequency identification) chip developers, said they could be part of all future workplaces.
"We already interact with technology all the time. Today it's a bit messy - we need pin codes and passwords. Wouldn't it be easy to just touch with your hand? That's really intuitive."' Mr Sjoblad said.
He said its launch at the Sime office in Stockholm will provide more research into the technology.
"We want to be able to understand this technology before big corporates and big government come to us and say everyone should get chipped - the tax authority chip, the Google or Facebook chip." Mr Sjoblad said.

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More than a quarter of people think they will be making payments using wearable devices including watches and wristbands.

“Whether it is contactless, wearable tech or fingerprint ID, people are increasingly expecting to use new technologies to make payments rather than rely on cash,” says Claire Garrod, head of personal current accounts at Lloyds Bank."

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"Dr. Katina Michael of the University of Wollongong, told OmniChannel Media that “Lloyds Bank revealed recently in a study they made last month in the UK, where they found that 28% of consumers there are willing to make payments using wearable devices, including watches and wristbands in the next ten years,”. Michael is an associate professor at the University of Wollongong’s School of Information Systems and Technology, and the editor in chief of IEEE Technology and Society Magazine.

“About 22% think they will regularly be using fingerprints to make those payments,” Michael said, “and even 7% of the population would consider things like implantable devices.”

She believes that the trend to apparel based contactless payment could well be taken up with enthusiasm in Australia.

“I think it’s an interesting question,” Michael said. “Australian studies are showing that locals are going contactless, using different kinds of form factors and are using touch and go systems,” Michaels adds: “How much would it stretch the consumer to consider an e-payment system with a similar embedded device either in the cuff or collar.”

Still, Michael explains, there are troublesome issues, like security, that impact the consumer’s confidence with this kind of innovation. Since the technology was never designed for security devices it can be hacked, killed, cloned, and identities stolen and all of this can be done so remotely and discreetly. “What we are doing by introducing yet another form factor is increasing the vector for fraud.”

Michael notes that the Apple watch take up in Australia has been significant and predicts that as much as one-third of the country’s consumers could move to contactless payment. “But I would say the vast majority [of shoppers] would use their common sense and would not invest or expose them to more security risk.”

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The wireless pacemaker is just 3mm long

The wireless pacemaker is just 3mm long

"US researchers have built a wirelessly powered pacemaker the size of a grain of rice and implanted it in a rabbit.

They were able to hold a metal plate a few centimetres above the rabbit's chest and use it to regulate the animal's heartbeat.

If such medical implants could be made to work in humans, it could lead to smaller devices that are safer to fit."

Read more here

Source of article in this academic paper here

Thanks KMA for the link. Does anyone know who created this image? A member of Gizmodo loaded it up here

Thanks Jore. This work belongs to: http://eranfolio.deviantart.com/art/Reality-1440x900-78861805 Artist is: EranFolio (aka Eran Fowler a Canadian artist) and title of work is "Reality".