"Or even less appealing, the state of this patient could be so severe, that they require full time skilled nursing care in the confines of a nursing home or assisted living facility.
“you could take a device and instead of the patient wearing it on his or her wrist or clothes, a physician implants that device in the chest”
Imagine much like a FitBit, you could take a device and instead of the patient wearing it on his or her wrist or clothes, a physician implants that device in the chest. That device then has wires that run underneath the skin to various nerves in the body and to the deep parts of the brain. That device can then send specific amounts of electricity to the nervous system at various times to disrupt the diseased pathway and restore the patient to normal health. "

Source: https://www.europeanpharmaceuticalreview.com/news/47692/imot-healthcare/

"In the future the data procured from smartwatches might be much more valuable than what is currently available from laptop and mobile users," reports David Curry, raising the possibility that stores might someday use your past Google searches to alert you when they're selling a cheaper product."

Source: http://readwrite.com/2016/05/01/marketers-...

Feed the data of millions of people playing various computer games into AI machine learning and shaping algorythms... It's already happening to an extent:

"The latest computer games can be fantastically realistic. Surprisingly, these lifelike virtual worlds might have some educational value, too—especially for fledgling AI algorithms.

Adrien Gaidon, a computer scientist at Xerox Research Center Europe in Grenoble, France, remembers watching someone play the video game Assassins Creed when he realized that the game’s photo-realistic scenery might offer a useful way to teach AI algorithms about the real world. Gaidon is now testing this idea by developing highly realistic 3-D environments for training algorithms how to recognize particular real-world objects or scenarios.

The idea is important because cutting-edge AI algorithms need to feed on huge quantities of data in order to learn to perform a task. Sometimes, that isn’t a problem. Facebook, for instance, has millions of labeled photographs with which to train the algorithms that automatically tag friends in uploading images (see “Facebook Creates Software that Matches Faces Almost as Well as You Do”). Likewise, Google is capturing huge amounts of data using its self-driving cars, which is then used to refine the algorithms that control those vehicles.

But most companies do not have access to such enormous data sets, or the means to generate such data from scratch.

To fill in those gaps, Gaidon and colleagues used a popular game development engine, called Unity, to generate virtual scenes for training deep-learning algorithms—a very large type of simulated neural network—to recognize objects and situations in real images. Unity is widely used to make 3-D video games, and many common objects are available to developers to use in their creations.

A paper describing the Xerox team’s work will be presented at a computer vision conference later this year. By creating a virtual setting, and letting an algorithm see lots of variations from different angles and with different lighting, it’s possible to teach that algorithm to recognize the same object in real images or video footage. “The nice thing about virtual worlds is you can create any kind of scenario,” Gaidon says.

Gaidon’s group also devised a way to convert a real scene into a virtual one by using a laser scanner to capture a scene in 3-D and then importing that information into the virtual world. The group was able to measure the accuracy of the approach by comparing algorithms trained within virtual environments with ones trained using real images annotated by people. “The benefits of simulation are well known,” he says, “but [we wondered], can we generate virtual reality that can fool an AI?”

The Xerox researchers hope to apply the technique in two situations. First, they plan to use it to find empty parking spots on the street using cameras fitted to buses. Normally doing this would involve collecting lots of video footage, and having someone manually annotate empty spaces. A huge amount of training data can be generated automatically using the virtual environment created by the Xerox team. Second, they are exploring whether it could be used to learn about medical issues using virtual hospitals and patients.

The challenge of learning with less data is well known among computer scientists, and it is inspiring many researchers to explore new approaches, some of which take their inspiration from human learning (see “Can This Man Make AI More Human?”).

“I think this is a very good idea,” says Josh Tenenbaum, a professor of cognitive science and computation at MIT, of the Xerox project. “It’s one that we and many others have been pursuing in different forms.”

Source: https://www.technologyreview.com/s/601009/...
Punching in security codes to deactivate the alarm at his store became a thing of the past for Jowan Oesterlund when he implanted a chip into his hand about 18 months ago. 
"When I walk into my studio, I just wave my hand at the alarm, and the alarm turns off," the tattoo artist said. 
"Whenever someone shows up with security clearance, he will wave and the alarm is deactivated, the lights are turned on... it will start up the computer, the cash machine and so on," he added.
Oesterlund is one of the small but growing number of people around the world who has a grain-sized NFC (Near Field Communications) chip embedded in him. 
In fact, so convinced is he that "this is the future" that he has two of them, one in his hand and the other in his arm. 
"One year ago it was 'that's just stupid', or 'wow that's just awesome'. But now multinational companies are looking into it," he said, pointing to cybersecurity firm Kaspersky as an example.
The renowned cybersecurity company had brought in Oesterlund to carry out a live demonstration of chip implantation at the IFA consumer electronics fair in Berlin which opens to the public Friday.
The nervous volunteer is Rainer Bock, who works at Kaspersky. After Oesterlund used a needle to put a chip under Bock's skin, the new member of the "cyborg" club said: "It didn't hurt." 
Curiosity a factor
With a memory of just 880 bytes, the chips are far from the science fiction equivalent of data powerhouses carrying billions of encrypted secret documents. 
Rather, they tend to have specific functions, such as unlocking a door or hooking up to an app on a smartphone. 
Despite the limited uses, human chip implant manufacturer Dangerous Things told AFP that there are now around 10,000 "cyborgs" -- or humans with digital chips in them -- across the globe.
The phenomenon is not new, with a club in Barcelona offering such implants to its members as early as 2004, allowing them to gain entrance and pay for their drinks with it.
But its popularity has now accelerated with the ubiquity of smartphones, which can communicate with the chips.
Those who have done the procedure admit that for now, novelty is its key draw. 
Evgeny Chereshnev, who also works for Kaspersky, got his chip about seven months ago.
"It felt weird for a couple of weeks... Then I started to understand that I've forgotten what it is to carry a badge to work, I've forgotten what it means to open a door with a key," he said, describing how with a simple wave of his hand, he now enters a secure office building without punching in codes or tapping a security card at the entrance. 
But such implants are not without risks, warns Kaspersky's European research director Marco Preuss, saying that a smartphone placed close to the chip for instance, could easily pick up data.

More here

Translation from the Dutch is as follows:

Professor warns of RFID implant in humans

  • Although some scientists are experimenting with injecting RFID chips in their own bodies, this can have serious consequences for humanity if it ever becomes commonplace. Before warns Katina Michael, a professor at the University of Wollongong.
  • Michael specializes in the social and ethical implications of emerging technologies. She states that injected RFID microchips actually be a unique identifier in the body. "And as we know numbers can be stolen, and data can be hacked. Remote computer problems in mapping the human body is full of dangers," she warns. RFID implants according to the professor for a surveillance society ensure that Big Brother is in our body.

Source here: http://rfidnieuws.blogspot.com.au/2014/04/professor-waarschuwt-voor-rfid.html

Rogers

Rogers

TeleGeography.com

TeleGeography.com

A great summation of uberveillance in relation to FitBit-style trackers by Richard Chirgwin of The Register. Article here