"... a collaboration between Apple and Cochlear, a company that has been involved with implant technology since the treatment’s early days ... announced last week that the first product based on this approach, Cochlear’s Nucleus 7 sound processor, won FDA approval in June—the first time that the agency has approved such a link between cochlear implants and phones or tablets.

Those using the system can not only get phone calls directly routed inside their skulls, but also stream music, podcasts, audio books, movie soundtracks, and even Siri—all straight to the implant.

It connects with hearing aids whose manufacturers have adopted the free Apple protocols, earning them a “Made for iPhone” approval. Apple also has developed a feature called Live Listen that lets hearing aid users employ the iPhone as a microphone—which comes in handy at meetings and restaurants.

An iPhone or iPod Touch pairs with hearing aids—cochlear and conventional—the same way that it finds AirPods or nearby Bluetooth speakers.


[...] Merging medical technology like Apple’s is a clear benefit to those needing hearing help. But I’m intrigued by some observations that Dr. Biever, the audiologist who’s worked with hearing loss patients for two decades, shared with me. She says that with this system, patients have the ability to control their sound environment in a way that those with good hearing do not—so much so that she is sometimes envious. How cool would it be to listen to a song without anyone in the room hearing it? “When I’m in the noisiest of rooms and take a call on my iPhone, I can’t hold my phone to ear and do a call,” she says. “But my recipient can do this.”

This paradox reminds me of the approach I’m seeing in the early commercial efforts to develop a brain-machine interface: an initial focus on those with cognitive challenges with a long-term goal of supercharging everyone’s brain. We’re already sort of cyborgs, working in a partnership of dependency with those palm-size slabs of glass and silicon that we carry in our pockets and purses. The next few decades may well see them integrated subcutaneously."

Source: https://www.wired.com/story/how-apple-is-p...
Want To Become A Grinder?
For those interested in becoming a grinder, there’s Biohack.me, an online resource for aspiring and operational biohackers (grinders) from around the world. There, you can search for regional groups and labs to connect with (where you can purchase your own implant kit), connect with other grinders in the forum, and learn more about this subculture. If you’re into the whole implant thing but don’t want to try an NFC/RFID chip, you could start with a magnet implant by renown body modification artist Steve Haworth.
Grinders or biohackers don’t always have implants. You could biohack the quantified self way, by utilizing today’s wearable tech, apps, and data to better your life like Chris Dancy did. Although some people might call Chris a cyborg, a wearable tech guru, or a biohacker, he’s just using today’s technology in ways that seem complicated now but will seem quite normal in the future.

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Punching in security codes to deactivate the alarm at his store became a thing of the past for Jowan Oesterlund when he implanted a chip into his hand about 18 months ago. 
"When I walk into my studio, I just wave my hand at the alarm, and the alarm turns off," the tattoo artist said. 
"Whenever someone shows up with security clearance, he will wave and the alarm is deactivated, the lights are turned on... it will start up the computer, the cash machine and so on," he added.
Oesterlund is one of the small but growing number of people around the world who has a grain-sized NFC (Near Field Communications) chip embedded in him. 
In fact, so convinced is he that "this is the future" that he has two of them, one in his hand and the other in his arm. 
"One year ago it was 'that's just stupid', or 'wow that's just awesome'. But now multinational companies are looking into it," he said, pointing to cybersecurity firm Kaspersky as an example.
The renowned cybersecurity company had brought in Oesterlund to carry out a live demonstration of chip implantation at the IFA consumer electronics fair in Berlin which opens to the public Friday.
The nervous volunteer is Rainer Bock, who works at Kaspersky. After Oesterlund used a needle to put a chip under Bock's skin, the new member of the "cyborg" club said: "It didn't hurt." 
Curiosity a factor
With a memory of just 880 bytes, the chips are far from the science fiction equivalent of data powerhouses carrying billions of encrypted secret documents. 
Rather, they tend to have specific functions, such as unlocking a door or hooking up to an app on a smartphone. 
Despite the limited uses, human chip implant manufacturer Dangerous Things told AFP that there are now around 10,000 "cyborgs" -- or humans with digital chips in them -- across the globe.
The phenomenon is not new, with a club in Barcelona offering such implants to its members as early as 2004, allowing them to gain entrance and pay for their drinks with it.
But its popularity has now accelerated with the ubiquity of smartphones, which can communicate with the chips.
Those who have done the procedure admit that for now, novelty is its key draw. 
Evgeny Chereshnev, who also works for Kaspersky, got his chip about seven months ago.
"It felt weird for a couple of weeks... Then I started to understand that I've forgotten what it is to carry a badge to work, I've forgotten what it means to open a door with a key," he said, describing how with a simple wave of his hand, he now enters a secure office building without punching in codes or tapping a security card at the entrance. 
But such implants are not without risks, warns Kaspersky's European research director Marco Preuss, saying that a smartphone placed close to the chip for instance, could easily pick up data.

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Source: http://www.cnet.com/au/news/poll-would-you-go-full-cyborg/#!.

Source: http://www.cnet.com/au/news/poll-would-you-go-full-cyborg/#!.

Stop the Cyborgs commented on this piece by Morrison as follows:

stopthecyborgsJun 7, 2013

"The issue is not "wearable tech", "implantable tech" or even full on artificial bodies. Prosthetics like prosthetic limbs, cochlear implants, pacemakers and enhancements like bottlenose which deliver extra senses are just an extension of human use of tools and medicine. It could be argued that humans have always been cyborgs in some sense. 

Unfortunately the current trajectory of development is: Überveillance and locked down systems tied into corporate controlled servers in the cloud. This means that the coming flood of devices will not be enhancements which you control or even stand alone systems which you can trust to do their job (even though you don't know what code they contain) but rather systems which report data to insurers, health care providers, employers, security services and which can be remotely controlled. The issue is therefore to what degree are you allow systems which make up your body to be externally controlled and therefore the degree to which you are prepared to give up fundamental freedom and agency in exchange for performance or connectivity. 

So here are some future possibilities: 

(1) Your life logging memories stored in the cloud are turned over by the 3rd party host in response to a legal request. 

(2) Your employer asks you to have an implant or use a wearable device. You feel that you will not be promoted and they may find a reason to sack you if you refuse. The implant monitors your movements away from work. 

(3) Your implant monitors compliance with your medical regime. Because you did not obey the doctors instructions to the letter you are classified as 'bad' and denied future medication or insurance coverage.

(4) Your extra special bionic eyes are remotely disabled turning you blind because you were at an anti government demonstration.

(5) Your legs are remotely disabled crippling you because of a payment dispute with the vendor."

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Transient

"...I still don’t think I’ll have wasted my time. There’s something poetic about having the present so firmly fixed into you that you can feel it become the past. I don’t have any interest in artistic or even visible body modification; there’s already enough pressure around figuring out how to look and dress. But give me something with even the thinnest veneer of usefulness, and I don’t care whether it makes any practical sense. It’s a symbolic way to declare my apostasy from nature, a first step towards becoming something that evolutionary psychologists can’t neatly box up with stories about cavemen and cavewomen. Maybe this is what being very slightly posthuman is — being able to get a new ability and say, "What’s the big deal?"

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