"....As technology becomes smaller, the way we carry it has progressed from luggable, to wearable and now towards devices that reside inside the human body, or insertables. This trend is particularly observable in many medical devices, such as pacemakers that were once large stand-alone devices and are now completely inserted into the body. We are now seeing a similar trajectory with non-medical systems. While people once carried keys to open office doors, these have been mostly replaced with wearable access dongles, worn around the neck or clipped to clothing. Some individuals have voluntarily taken the technology from these dongles and inserted it directly into their body. In this paper we introduce insertables as a new interaction device of choice and provide a definition of insertables, classifying emerging and near future devices as insertables. This paper demonstrates this trajectory towards devices inside the human body, and carves out insertables as a specific subset of devices which are voluntary, non-surgical and removable."

Read more at http://www.firstmonday.dk/ojs/index.php/fm/article/view/6214/5970

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Authoralexanderhayes
Categoriesinsertables

"...Weenect Kids lets you always know where your child is. The GPS tracker is connected to your smartphone through a mobile app so that you can check their location at any time on a map." - Read more

Axon creates connected technologies for truth in public safety.

"....TASER and Microsoft have formed a unique partnership that brings together two powerful technology platforms to meet the unique needs of law enforcement today. With unmatched technology innovation and industry-leading security, the partnership is enabling transformation in public safety practices while also promoting greater transparency and trust between law enforcement and private citizens."

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This man knows a lot about what is happening in this area - https://ccj.asu.edu/content/michael-white

The EpiCentre - https://epicenterstockholm.com/

Part of the Urban Escape initiative - http://urbanescape.se/

It's old news but some readers may have missed it - http://www.ibtimes.co.uk/stockholm-office-workers-epicenter-implanted-microchips-pay-their-lunch-1486045

Then there's the cyborg group in Stokholm.

Read more on them here - http://www.bbc.com/news/technology-30144072

The American Medical Association (AMA) code of ethics released in 2007 to protect patients' receiving RFID implants emerged following an evaluation by the AMA's council on Ethical and Judicial Affairs (CEJA) which discussed ethical issues relating to using RFID implants for medical purposes.

Opinion 2.40 - Radio Frequency ID Devices in Humans

Radio frequency identification (RFID) devices may help to identify patients, thereby improving the safety and efficiency of patient care, and may be used to enable secure access to patient clinical information. However, their efficacy and security have not been established. Therefore, physicians implanting such devices should take certain precautions:

(1) The informed consent process must include disclosure of medical uncertainties associated with these devices.

(2) Physicians should strive to protect patients’ privacy by storing confidential information only on RFID devices with informational security similar to that required of medical records.

(3) Physicians should support research into the safety, efficacy, and potential non-medical uses of RFID devices in human beings. (I, III, V)

"...We've been putting chips in animals for 20 years," he points out. Now it is the turn of the humans."

July 27, 2005 -- They're here. They have FDA approval. But are Americans ready to get chipped?
Getting chipped means having a radio frequency identification (RFID) chip implanted in your body. The chip -- about the size of a large grain of rice -- lies dormant until a special scanner is passed within 6 inches of the implant. Then it emits a radio signal that beams a 16-digit number to the scanner.
For security uses, that 16-digit number acts like an electronic key. For medical uses, the number is linked to medical records. Doctors to whom you've granted access -- emergency room doctors, for example -- can use the key to quickly get hold of your medical records.
Who would want such a thing? That depends on how you ask, says Scott Silverman, CEO of Applied Digital, which makes the FDA-approved RFID called VeriChip.
"When we first announced VeriChip, a network poll asked people if they would put one in their bodies," Silverman tells WebMD. "Only 9% said yes. After FDA approval, 19% said yes. When former HHS Secretary Tommy Thompson joined our board, the rate went up to 33%. But our own study shows that if you ask people whether they would have a VeriChip implant to identify their medical records in case of an emergency, the positive response goes to 80%."

More here

“A few years ago, I perched on the edge of my bed in a tiny flat, breathing in a cloud of acetone fumes, using a scalpel to pick at the corner of an electronic travel card. More than 10 million Londoners use these Oyster cards to ride the city’s public transport network. I had decided to dissect mine. After letting the card sit in pink nail polish remover for a week, the plastic had softened enough that I could peel apart the layers. Buried inside was a tiny microchip attached to a fine copper wire: the radio frequency identification (RFID) chip.
My goal was to bury the chip under my skin, so that the machine barriers at the entrance to the Underground would fly open with a wave of my hand, as if I was some kind of technological wizard. But although I had the chip and an ex-Royal Marines medic willing to do the surgery, I failed to get my hands on the high-grade silicone I’d need to coat the chip to prevent my body reacting against it. Since then, people have used the technique I helped popularise to put liberated Oyster chips in bracelets, rings, magic wands, even fruit, but the prize for first London transport cyborg is still up for grabs.
The person who does will find themselves inducted into the community of “grinders” – hobbyists who modify their own body with technological improvements.  Just as you might find petrol heads poring over an engine, or hackers tinkering away at software code, grinders dream up ways to tweak their own bodies. One of the most popular upgrades is to implant a microchip under the skin, usually in the soft webbing between the thumb and forefinger.”"

More here

Justin Huntsdale, Katina Michael, and Lauren Thrift. "Unliking Facebook - the social media addiction that has you by the throat"ABC Illawarra Jan. 2015. Original source document here: http://www.abc.net.au/local/stories/2015/01/23/4167400.htm

"At the top of your Facebook profile where you can write something for everyone to see, it asks 'What's on your mind'?

The answer is fast becoming 'this, at the expense of a lot else'."

In 2010, MG Michael and I began to write a book chapter for Jeremy Pitt of Imperial College London where we referred to the ultimate sensor-- the iPlant. See: http://works.bepress.com/kmichael/228/ titled: "Implementing Namebers Using Microchip Implants: The Black Box Beneath The Skin" which appeared in This Pervasive Day.

iDermal (video below) seems to be conveying the idea of a "contactable" human-computer interface. This is where the skin becomes the interface for digital technology.

Having studied the domain of smart cards in relation to automatic teller machines (ATMs) this video brought back some very interesting allusions. Note the FOUR contact points being made here by the body-modder to facilitate wearability. Is that the future we are to ponder? Is that the "jack in" we are to expect with emerging applications and services? The comments that bloggers have upload are extremely pertinent. One of these reads:

"Liz Vaughn - 2 weeks ago
What an idiot! As a piercer he should realize the damage that A- putting something that can't be thoroughly sterilized and B- the weight of something like that, can do to any fresh piercing, let alone sub anchors. Ugh. It's also illegal in several states (including NJ) to use a biopsy punch."

This comment is preceded by this one:

          "Courtney Hart - 4 months ago
Guys! Calm down! I was at Dynasty Tattoo today to get pierced by Dave and he doesn't have the iDermal in anymore. He simply wanted to create a "strapless watch" and invent a new body modification. He had no intention to keep it I'm sure so everyone just calm down. He's an Awesome , social, and funny guy, and I will definitely be going back to him."
Source: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QKVNVoBScFA

Source: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QKVNVoBScFA

Transient
Transient
Source: Dave Hurban

Source: Dave Hurban

Some of you might find the following image of interest- it was created by Michael, Michael & Abbas in 2009 and adapted by Michael, Michael & Perakslis in 2013. Note the lowest common denominator of tracking is the sensor view that MG Michael and I dubbed "iPlant".

drone to sensor.gif

The word "iPlant" was chosen as the preferred term for an implantable device having studied both Apple's and NTT Docomo's former product line. E.g. i-mode, i-appli, i-area, i-channel, iD; and Apple's including iTunes, iPod, iLife, iSight, iWork, iPhone, iPad. The collage (see below) was created for the FET11 conference: http://works.bepress.com/kmichael/220/ titled: "Heaven and Hell: Visions for Pervasive Adaptation".

docomo apple.jpg