"It works just as one might expect—diners approach a virtual menu, select the item they want to purchase, and then choose “facial scan” as a payment option. Users must input their phone numbers as an extra layer of verification, but the technology still works even if one’s phone is turned off, an Ant Financial spokesperson tells Quartz.

A promotional video shows a young female customer scanning her face while donning a wig and appearing with friends, to tout that the technology can recognize an individual even if they are disguised or in a group.

Alibaba’s Jack Ma first introduced the technology at a tech conference in Germany in 2015, dubbing it “smile to pay.” While Ant Financial has since let users login to its Alipay mobile payments app using facial scan, the KFC partnership marks the first time it has been rolled out for commerce. An Ant Financial spokesperson tells Quartz that it intends to roll out the scanning at more locations later."

Source: https://qz.com/1067460/in-china-facial-rec...

"Could flashing the "peace" sign in photos lead to fingerprint data being stolen? Research by a team at Japan's National Institute of Informatics (NII) says so, raising alarm bells over the popular two-fingered pose. Fingerprint recognition technology is becoming widely available to verify identities, such as when logging on to smartphones, tablets and laptop computers. But the proliferation of mobile devices with high-quality cameras and social media sites where photographs can be easily posted is raising the risk of personal information being leaked, reports said. The NII researchers were able to copy fingerprints based on photos taken by a digital camera three meters (nine feet) away from the subject."

Source: https://phys.org/news/2017-01-japan-finger...
Posted
AuthorJordan Brown

"Starting this summer, the [Japanese] government will test a system in which foreign tourists will be able to verify their identities and buy things at stores using only their fingerprints.

The government hopes to increase the number of foreign tourists by using the system to prevent crime and relieve users from the necessity of carrying cash or credit cards. It aims to realize the system by the 2020 Tokyo Olympic and Paralympic Games.

The experiment will have inbound tourists register their fingerprints and other data, such as credit card information, at airports and elsewhere.

Tourists would then be able to conduct tax exemption procedures and make purchases after verifying their identities by placing two fingers on special devices installed at stores."

Source: http://the-japan-news.com/news/article/000...
Posted
AuthorJordan Brown
“In the long run, chip implants could make it less intrusive than some emerging ID systems which rely on physical biometrics (like your fingerprints or unique eye pattern),” says Alex Soojung-Kim Pang, author of the book “Distraction Addiction” and visiting scholar at Stanford's University’s Peace Innovation Lab.
“This should be a matter of individual choice, but fighting crime should be much easier using chips,” adds sci-fi author Larry Niven, who predicted chip implants in the ’70s. Niven said he supports chip implantation for security reasons, provided it is an opt-in measure.
Ramez Naam, who led the early development of Microsoft software projects and is now a popular speaker and author, said he envisions using chip implantation to help monitor the location of people with Alzheimer's disease.
They could be used to track the activities of felons who have been released from prison.
Chips are being used today to manage farm animals. Farmers can track sheep, pigs and horses as they move through a gate, weigh them instantly and make sure they are eating properly.
Device Under Skin Tells Doc You're OK (Or Not)
“Those same chips have found their way into RFID devices to activate the gas pump from a key ring and for anti-theft devices in cars,” said Stu Lipoff, an electrical engineer and Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers spokesman.
“There have been people who volunteered to use them for opening the door of an apartment as a personalized ID using your arm. It could be used to track criminals targeted for patrol who might wander into a restricted area.”
Possible uses in the future
Implants are normally useful only at short ranges – as you walk through a portal or close to a transponder. So using chip implants to track people would require an infrastructure of transponders scattered around a city that read their identity in public buildings and street corners, Lipoff said.

More here

A great summation of uberveillance in relation to FitBit-style trackers by Richard Chirgwin of The Register. Article here 

"Unique Identification Authority of India (UIDAI) should be wound up as biometrics has failed miserably in many parts of the country, said eminent legal expert Usha Ramanathan.

Delivering a lecture on ‘Interrogating the UID and the National Population Register,’ Ms. Ramanathan, who has been monitoring and engaging with the UID project, said: “In India, we have no idea if biometrics will work or not.”

“Two to five per cent of people do not have fingerprints that work,” she said, pointing to the study using biometric technology which was tested on 25,000 people by the Biometrics Standards Committee before commencement of the project in 2009.

“It is an anti-people project. I am not willing to have a technology god to oversee me. Companies handling biometric data also have close links with intelligence agencies,” said Ms. Ramanathan.

Following the memorandum of understanding between the Registrar General of India and UIDAI, the National Population Register is breaking the rule in collecting biometrics, she added.

“There is simply too much we do not know. The National Population Register is actually acting illegally. The executive has systematically ignored the order of the Supreme Court. Yet there is hardly any questioning and reporting in the media.”

She stressed the need for learning the principles of civil disobedience when the State sees itself above the law. “There has never been an audit of the system. We need to destroy the system.”

“It is not a unique identity project. It is a unique identification project. It is about helping agencies identify us,” she said.

Chairing the talk and moderating the discussion, eminent lawyer Geeta Ramaseshan, clarified why we need to be wary of the hidden agenda in official schemes for creating a citizens’ roster through invasive data harvesting."

Thanks or the link KMA.

See also http://www.thealternative.in/society/what-we-dont-know-about-the-companies/


As these Creative Commons pictures show the enrolment and registration process of all Indian residents by the Unique Identification Authority of India (UIDAI). The 12-digit unique number will be stored in a centralized database and linked to the basic demographics and biometric information – photograph, ten fingerprints and iris of each individual. This replaces paper-based cards. Photos by Chirantani Vidyapith Howrah and Fotokannan.

Getty Images. Source: http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/uk-news/schools-fingerprint-more-one-million-2981820

Getty Images. Source: http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/uk-news/schools-fingerprint-more-one-million-2981820

NSW Premier Barry O'Farrell has backed the right of schools to use fingerprint scanners to track whether kids are skipping class.

"Several public schools are using hi-tech scanners to record when students enter and leave school across the state.

"I think that's a good thing because it reflects our policy of 'local schools, local decisions', which enables schools to make decisions that meet the needs of their communities," Mr O'Farrell told reporters.

Asked whether he had any privacy concerns, the premier said the decision to use the technology was ultimately a matter for individual schools.

"If school communities want to make decisions, whether about the opening hours of schools or whether about these sorts of issues, I'm happy to back them," Mr O'Farrell said.

Civil Liberties Australia have concerns over fingerprint scanning students.

"We support proper use of new technology, but this development has inherent dangers which should be evaluated by schools, their governing bodies and parents," Civil Liberties Australia CEO Bill Rowlings said.

"Schools and education authorities must put robust rules in place for how technology is used and administered, and the data safeguarded.

"A scan on arrival just tells you who passed through the school gates on the way in.

"The only way to ensure a child is at school all day is to fingerprint the student every half hour.

"So pretty soon children will be scanned into every classroom, every separate facility within the school grounds.

"If that is done, suddenly schools will become mini-surveillance states."" 

Read about the one million students biometric-fied in the UK here. An estimated 31 per cent of schools did not consult parents before using the biometric technology.