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Article by Mark Martin of CBN:

"Convenience vs. Privacy

It raises a number of questions, however, like what about privacy? And can the information on that wristband be stolen?

"With the RFID technology, we're not tracking anybody," Foster said. "There's a two- to three-inch read range required to be able to read that information on the tag, and if you can read that information on the tag, there's nothing you can do with that information because everything is encrypted also on the back-end server."

That may be the case with the wristbands, but consumer privacy expert Dr. Katherine Albrecht is concerned about RFID technology in general and what the future holds.

"They want RFID tags in your refrigerator, in the objects that you buy, and ultimately, as Dr. Katina Michael is making so clear, they want these tags in us," Albrecht shared on her nationally syndicated radio show.

"We're using radio frequency to identify things and transmit information all the time nowadays," Albrecht said. "I think what is coming next, though, is what the marketers and developers of this technology call the 'Internet of Things.' This idea is that every physical object would have its own equivalent of an IP address encoded into the microchip."

She said their goal is to track the consumer's habits."

Full article available here.