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Courtesy: Empire North

Courtesy: Empire North

"On paper you can invent anything. The difficult part is bringing what is on paper to life, or so it would seem. Empire North, is an intriguing slice of docu-fiction that explores this very notion of creativity, and in doing so attempts to break down the barriers between life and art. Danish artist Jakob Boesko directs and stars as Jakob Valdason, a cartoonist who conceives of a fictitious futuristic rifle called the ID Sniper; a high-powered weapon that can implant a GPS microchip into the body of a human being. The rifle works as a long distance injector with the microchip entering the body causing no internal damage and only a small amount of physical pain; that equal to a mosquito bite.
Valdason creates a new identity for himself; no longer is he Jakob Valdason, the poor cartoonist, but rather Jakob Valdason, the polished CEO of the fabricated weapons company, Empire North. With his new persona, along with a prototype for his ID Sniper, Valdason travels to a weapons fair in Qatar to unveil his futuristic rifle to the international weapons community. His objective: to take a product from the future with a combination of technologies not yet seen, bring into the present, and see if people accept it as real.
With Empire North, Jakob Boesko gives us a brief glimpse into the unsettling realities of the international arms trade. Over 1.5 trillion dollars are spent on military expenditures worldwide annually, in what is essentially a deceiving competition to uncover the next big weapon of the future. When foreign developers begin to flock to Valdason and Empire North; when his indox becomes overwhelmed with interested parties ranging from developers, investors, and military officials, reality sets in that while the ID Sniper is a fallacy, the fascination around it and what it could potential provide, is anything but fallacious. In describing the modern world during a voice over, Valdason is quoted in saying, ‘this is the decade of deception, the era of fiction’, and no where is this supposition more prevalent than in the international arms trade, where the global jockeying for control can often eclipse any form of moral compass. Where profits and power can dominate in the name of security, safety, and rights of freedoms."