In 2005, I jointly ran a single person participant observation using this Magellan GPS below, to track and monitor the behaviour of a SINGLE individual. Gotta say we were way ahead of our time! Compare the photo from the research study I co-wrote with the image that appears at the bottom of the screen printed in The Independent news article.

Courtesy: Michael, McNamee et al. "Location-Based Intelligence – Modeling Behavior in Humans using GPS" IEEE International Symposium on Technology and Society, New York, United States: IEEE, 2006. Available at: http://works.bepress.com/kmichael/6  

Courtesy: Michael, McNamee et al. "Location-Based Intelligence – Modeling Behavior in Humans using GPS" IEEE International Symposium on Technology and Society, New York, United States: IEEE, 2006. Available at: http://works.bepress.com/kmichael/6

 

"The revelation that George Osborne has begun using Jawbone Up, the activity-tracking wristband that monitors how much you move during the day and whether you sleep enough at night, caused some mirth in Westminster last week.

But the Chancellor isn’t the only one joining in the wearable technology trend. Marissa Mayer, CEO of Yahoo!, is giving Up wristbands to its 11,000 employees, and tech industry observers foresee a time when the activity tracker is issued to new employees with their laptop and smartphone.
While wearable computing isn’t new, this year it’s everywhere. Activity trackers like Jawbone Up and Fitbit Flex are increasingly prominent. Google Glass, the computer-enhanced eyewear with in-built camera, speaker and internet connectivity has a growing profile. And smartwatches, such as the Pebble, are moving smartphone features to a wristwatch.
Juniper research says that 15 million wearable computing gadgets will be sold this year and expects that to increase to 70 million by 2017. If Apple’s rumoured iWatch appears, then expect growth to hasten.

Wristbands, watches and glasses are just the beginning. Next-generation wearables will be part of the fabric of our clothes – literally. London-based CuteCircuit has developed a mobile phone dress with an antenna in the seam and the SIM card in the label. Artist and designer Dominic Wilcox’s No Place Like Home shoes use GPS and LED lights to give directions." 

 

Titled: From Head to Toe - Wearable Computingraphic: John Bradley

Titled: From Head to Toe - Wearable Computingraphic: John Bradley