When we talk of embedded surveillance devices we are not just talking about chip implants that take physiological characteristics such as heart rate, temperature etc. Or wearable GPS for location services...

Someone recently stopped me and said you've gone too far by talking of embedded cameras in your book chapter.

Thank you Steve Mann for recently directing me to one of your patents dating back to the year 2000.

The full patent for the IMPLANTABLE CAMERA SYSTEM that can be found here states:

"An implantable personal imaging system is described. The apparatus of the invention functions as a true extension of the mind and body of the user, giving rise to a natural genre of imaging. In a dental embodiment, a picture is captured on mouth movement, for example, when the user smiles possibly for someone else's picture (posing and shooting at the same time). In an occular implant artificial eye embodiment, images are captured from a true Point Of Eye (POE). Additionally, the prosthetic device restores some depth perception."
Copyright: Steve Man (patent application CA 2313693)

Copyright: Steve Man (patent application CA 2313693)

Back in 2010 I remember listening to a talk by Kevin Warwick delivered at the University of Sydney. In this stimulating talk Kevin semi-joked that the space below the shoulders known as the clavicles had been deliberated left "empty" just for implantables. Indeed any search of "brain pacemakers" these days will bring up a host of images.

MG Michael and I have been writing of this potential since mid 2000 when we began to investigate deep brain stimulation and the vagus nerve in medical journals. My TEDx talk touched on the potential commercialisation of biomedical implants for entertainment services.

Source: http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-ToSQdlYpvgc/UAAqfySxipI/AAAAAAAACNk/AZ95i8Bl7JY/s1600/Blog+7-13-12.jpg

Source: http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-ToSQdlYpvgc/UAAqfySxipI/AAAAAAAACNk/AZ95i8Bl7JY/s1600/Blog+7-13-12.jpg