Today I received my first POV wedding invitation- it was an invitation with a difference, that's for sure, and one I will never forget! Putting aside that I am related to the groom, I inwardly felt happy for the celebration that is to be in 2013. How could I not? This 60 second video clip captured special moments leading up to the big question- despite that the moments had been re-enacted... I felt like I had already shared in part of their journey and was happy to catch a glimpse of the bride before the big day given we've never met.

Here is just one similar example I found on the web...

It is interesting to see how much technology featured in this relationship above (chat, SMS, even mobile location-based sharing). Numerous times while watching however I felt like the persons depicted in the "video" were acting, obviously aware they were being filmed and for the purpose of creating this clip. No doubt, it would be a lot of fun to be the star of your own show (fast forwarding through a period of say months or years in just a few minutes). 

Imagine through POV cameras, you could capture LIVE meetings "for the first time" and then go back and summarise what really happened not what you imagined happened.

One example lifelogging device is the Autographer showcased in this article

The Autographer does not record sound, though Williams says she has experimented with compressing a day's recordings into five-minute summaries. "It's pretty easy to filter out speech," she says. "Recording that would be an invasion of privacy, and would limit what people would say." And as she points out, there are plenty of other sound recording devices already on the market.
The Autographer should also appeal to consumers as a way of recording trips and holidays without constantly using a separate camera. Further, OMG says in a statement: "Autographer is designed to change the way we think about photography: one where moments are captured without intervention. The user can live the experience while Autographer spontaneously captures the stories that unfold. This is not just a new camera but a whole new photographic approach."

Yes, fairytales do come true but life is rarely as smooth as our best memories would dictate. But who would discount the value of such a recording as the one of the happy couple of above? What better way to be reminded of where it all began when times get tough on occasion through life challenges?

The reality however is that some of these relationships will fail and what then? 

2.1 Total divorces granted, Australia - 1991-2011 [Caption: ABS 3310.0 - Marriages and Divorces, Australia, 2011 ]  

2.1 Total divorces granted, Australia - 1991-2011

[Caption: ABS 3310.0 - Marriages and Divorces, Australia, 2011 ]

 

Perhaps there is a potentially ugly side to POV and the glamour of capturing "every moment of your life"... While going through a bitter divorce most people would be inclined to naturally try to move on by deleting or removing images and video footage from sight when for a variety of reasons things just don't work out. What then to POV if taken in the same way as a reality TV show?

This is true of any relationship- not just marriages... the same can pertain to partnerships, friendships and the like.

There are some who would discount that there is an ugly side to real-time POV... but what next? A break-up video? How I caught you on camera with someone else? The swearing and the shouting captured while the children are crying? The tears that follow and the anguish?

The point I am trying to make is that there is an occasion for all things. A video invitation is a great idea for the happy couple who want a "time capsule" to remember perhaps the most carefree time of their life... something that can be handed down to children as a long-lasting representation of love in the immediate family. But those who tout real-time POV, all the time for every occasion, have to rethink what "always on" REALLY means and the consequences of such an existence.

Caption: http://www.cnet.com.au/autographer-is-a-wearable-camera-to-document-life-339341746.htm By Lexy Savvides   |   September 25, 2012 "The Autographer uses five sensors: an accelerometer, thermometer, motion detector, colour sensor and magnetometer for direction information. In conjunction with the GPS unit, the camera determines the best time to take a photo, based on the readings from these sensors. It detects shifts in colour, lighting and location, and assumes that these changes indicate an interesting subject or action taking place. It can take still images or video, as well as create animated GIFs and stop-frame videos. The fixed-focus lens gives a 136-degree field-of-view, while an OLED screen displays the results. Because of its design, it's not as wearable as something like Google Glass, but it can be clipped onto a shirt or worn around the neck."

Caption: http://www.cnet.com.au/autographer-is-a-wearable-camera-to-document-life-339341746.htm

By Lexy Savvides   |   September 25, 2012


"The Autographer uses five sensors: an accelerometer, thermometer, motion detector, colour sensor and magnetometer for direction information. In conjunction with the GPS unit, the camera determines the best time to take a photo, based on the readings from these sensors. It detects shifts in colour, lighting and location, and assumes that these changes indicate an interesting subject or action taking place.

It can take still images or video, as well as create animated GIFs and stop-frame videos. The fixed-focus lens gives a 136-degree field-of-view, while an OLED screen displays the results. Because of its design, it's not as wearable as something like Google Glass, but it can be clipped onto a shirt or worn around the neck."