Tim Holt and Katina Michael. "Dashcams Used to Gather Evidence of Adverse Driver Behaviour: Police Encourage Reporting by Citizens" ABC South East NSW Radio: Mornings with Tim Holt Jan. 2015.

“From the privacy perspective, we are of course pleased to see Google drop this product,” Marc Rotenberg, president of the Electronic Privacy Information Center, wrote in an email. “And it is a very big deal when Google backs down, particularly after its big push.”

He continued: “But it is also speaks to a larger issue in tech design about privacy. Eyeglass-mounted web display and phone for those who wanted it? Not really a problem. Surveillance and recording of those around the user? Yeah, that’s a problem.”

More here

More here

The wearable, non-irritating sensor tattoo can detect glucose in the fluid just under the skin.  It is based on integrating glucose extraction and electrochemical biosensing.  Testing on seven volunteers showed  that it was able to accurately determine glucose levels. The sensor response correlated with that of a commercial glucose monitor.



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"The technology titan is putting brakes on an "explorer" program that let people interested in dabbling with Glass buy eyewear for $1,500 apiece.

"Glass was in its infancy, and you took those very first steps and taught us how to walk," the team said of its "explorer" clients in a post on the Google+ social network.

"Well, we still have some work to do, but now we're ready to put on our big kid shoes and learn how to run."

The last day to buy Glass as part of the Explorer program will be Monday and Google did not indicate when a general consumer version of the eyewear might debut.

"Google Glass hasn't truly been released as a product yet -- it's been in long-term beta for over two years," said Forrester analyst J.P. Gownder.

"This organizational move will help to clarify the go to market strategy for both consumer and for enterprise customers."

The Glass test, or beta, program was later expanded to Britain.

During the Explorer testing phase, developers are creating apps for Google Glass, which can range from getting weather reports to sharing videos to playing games.

Glass connects to the Internet using Wi-Fi hot spots or, more typically, by being wirelessly tethered to mobile phones. Pictures or video may be shared through the Google+ social network.

- Outgrown the lab -

"As we look to the road ahead, we realize that we've outgrown the lab and so we're officially graduating from Google X to be our own team," the Glass post said.

"We're thrilled to be moving even more from concept to reality."

Instead of being part of the Google X lab working on innovations such as self-driving cars, the Glass team will become a separate unit answering to Tony Fadell, co-founder of Nest.

Google bought the smart thermostat maker early last year in a multi-billion-dollar deal and brought the former Apple executive on board in the process.

Google has announced alliances with the frame giant behind Ray-Ban and other high-end brands to create and sell Glass eyewear in the United States.

A partnership with Luxottica was portrayed as Google's "biggest step yet into the emerging smart eyewear market."

Luxottica brands include Oakley, Alain Mikli, Ray-Ban and Vogue-Eyewear.

The first smart glasses by Luxottica for Google Glass will go on sale this year, the Italian eyewear group has forecast.

Google has been working to burnish the image of Glass, which has triggered concerns about privacy since the devices are capable of capturing pictures and video.

Forrester data shows that while 43 percent of consumers are interested in Glass, even more have worries about privacy problems caused by the eyewear.

"Google needs to construct a consumer image for the product, and deal with privacy concerns if they want it to be mass market," Gownder said.

A great summation of uberveillance in relation to FitBit-style trackers by Richard Chirgwin of The Register. Article here 

"Full utilization of current implants in this way would be difficult without open access to their internals. Fortunately, threading a 16-spot electrode snake into your cochlea is not the only road to acoustic nirvana. New bone conduction technologies that make Google’s Glass sound downright primitive are already available. Cochlear corporation, one of the three big implant makers in the US, makes a device they recently trademarked as BAHA (bone anchored hearing aid). The BAHA is not your grandpa’s hearing aid; nothing goes inside the ear canal. The key element here is a screw that impedance-matches sound vibrations to your skull, and also provides an anchor for the speech processor and associated electronics.

The weak link for implants has always been communication through the skin. The BAHA’s titanium screw has a special surface treatment that aids in osseointegration (integration with the surrounding bone). The external part of the device then screws in through a gap in the skin. In theory, the entire vibratory stimulator could be put inside the bone implant. The attachment to any external processor, if needed, could be with done similarly to the way the IMS retinal prosthesis does it, with subcutaneous magnets. More likely, however, directly attached external controllers will remain critical components for these devices. Rather than a thick feed through as is the current BAHA design, something more comparable to a body piercing could adequately serve as the physical interface for an even more user-friendly device."

Now compare to the narrative clip. 


"You're at the Westin Grand in Berlin having a luxurious vacation. After finishing a delicious bowl of mushroom consommé -- chanterelles are in season, after all -- you stroll up the lavish center staircase toward your room. Having left wallets in the past, you simply hover your Apple Watch over the door. "Click!" And that's that. Magnetic plastic cards are so uncivilized.

This is the future Apple imagines for you with its new Watch, and it's working with Starwood Hotels (the group that owns Westin, among others) to make that future a reality. And that's just one of several scenarios for Apple Watch that were introduced by Apple VP Kevin Lynch during a third-party app demo on stage in Cupertino, California."

"Beyond Starwood, American Airlines is also working on Apple Watch -- both are usingWatchKit, the software toolkit Apple built for third-party app development. The specific context wasn't given for its use with American, but one can easily imagine using Apple Watch as your electronic boarding pass."

Read more

 http://www.engadget.com/2014/09/09/apple-watch-apps/

http://www.engadget.com/2014/09/09/apple-watch-apps/

 http://www.tuaw.com/2014/04/30/kwikset-kevo-using-your-iphone-to-lock-and-unlock-doors/

http://www.tuaw.com/2014/04/30/kwikset-kevo-using-your-iphone-to-lock-and-unlock-doors/

 http://www.tuaw.com/2014/04/30/kwikset-kevo-using-your-iphone-to-lock-and-unlock-doors/

http://www.tuaw.com/2014/04/30/kwikset-kevo-using-your-iphone-to-lock-and-unlock-doors/

 http://www.tuaw.com/2014/04/30/kwikset-kevo-using-your-iphone-to-lock-and-unlock-doors/

http://www.tuaw.com/2014/04/30/kwikset-kevo-using-your-iphone-to-lock-and-unlock-doors/

 Source: http://www.abc.net.au/tv/bigideas/stories/2014/09/04/4081183.htm

Source: http://www.abc.net.au/tv/bigideas/stories/2014/09/04/4081183.htm

 Source: http://www.iq2oz.com/debates/we-are-becoming-enslaved-by-our-technology-/

Source: http://www.iq2oz.com/debates/we-are-becoming-enslaved-by-our-technology-/

 Source: http://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/bigideas/enslaved-by-our-technology3f/5598912

Source: http://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/bigideas/enslaved-by-our-technology3f/5598912

 Source: http://www.acola.org.au/index.php/news/70-we-are-becoming-enslaved-by-our-technology

Source: http://www.acola.org.au/index.php/news/70-we-are-becoming-enslaved-by-our-technology

 Source: http://www.cnet.com/au/news/poll-would-you-go-full-cyborg/#!.

Source: http://www.cnet.com/au/news/poll-would-you-go-full-cyborg/#!.

Stop the Cyborgs commented on this piece by Morrison as follows:

stopthecyborgsJun 7, 2013

"The issue is not "wearable tech", "implantable tech" or even full on artificial bodies. Prosthetics like prosthetic limbs, cochlear implants, pacemakers and enhancements like bottlenose which deliver extra senses are just an extension of human use of tools and medicine. It could be argued that humans have always been cyborgs in some sense. 

Unfortunately the current trajectory of development is: Überveillance and locked down systems tied into corporate controlled servers in the cloud. This means that the coming flood of devices will not be enhancements which you control or even stand alone systems which you can trust to do their job (even though you don't know what code they contain) but rather systems which report data to insurers, health care providers, employers, security services and which can be remotely controlled. The issue is therefore to what degree are you allow systems which make up your body to be externally controlled and therefore the degree to which you are prepared to give up fundamental freedom and agency in exchange for performance or connectivity. 

So here are some future possibilities: 

(1) Your life logging memories stored in the cloud are turned over by the 3rd party host in response to a legal request. 

(2) Your employer asks you to have an implant or use a wearable device. You feel that you will not be promoted and they may find a reason to sack you if you refuse. The implant monitors your movements away from work. 

(3) Your implant monitors compliance with your medical regime. Because you did not obey the doctors instructions to the letter you are classified as 'bad' and denied future medication or insurance coverage.

(4) Your extra special bionic eyes are remotely disabled turning you blind because you were at an anti government demonstration.

(5) Your legs are remotely disabled crippling you because of a payment dispute with the vendor."

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Courtesy of CNN

Courtesy of CNN

"Ariel Garten believes that the brain -- with its 100 billion neurons that receive, register, and respond to thoughts and impulses -- has the power to accomplish almost anything, if only its power could be properly harnessed.
Can a headband read your mind?
Her company InteraXon, which she co-founded withTrevor Coleman, has produced Muse, a lightweight headband that uses electroencephalography (EEG) sensors to monitor your brain activity, transmitting that information to a smartphone, laptop or tablet.
The high-tech headband has been used to pour beer, levitate chairs, or control the lights -- all without the wearer lifting a finger.
And in a world where technology is often blamed for raising stress levels, 35-year-old Garten believes her $300 headband could even help calm us down."

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