Source: Fjord

Source: Fjord

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"Kidnappings in Mexico have worsened in the last 5 years, sky-rocketing by 371%. So too have the demand for those RFID implants that were said to allow authorities find the victims. Except for one thing: they don't work.

Mexico has a pretty serious kidnapping problem-so serious that there is now a market for a $4,000...Read more

The main problem is that the technology, for a number of reasons, couldn't have worked in the first place. For one, the implants are much too small for a satellite to pick up. And that's without taking into account the barriers the implant's signal would have to overcome—that is, metal, concrete, and the water of the human body. For another, the implants can't be trusted to broadcast a signal without losing its teeny tiny charge.

And even if the police did manage to pick up the signal, there'd be no time to mount a raid to save you. All told, you're probably only about 1% less screwed.

That hasn't stopped RFID manufacturers from raking in the money in the last two years. Xega's still very much at it, even after admitting the technology is "bad for the country." UPIwrites:

Xega charges people seeking the implant $2,000 up front, with annual fees of $2,000. For their money, implant customers get a radio frequency identification chip implanted into the fatty tissue of the arm.

Dickbaggery, thy name is RFID peddlers. [Washington Post via UPI]"

Photo Credit: AP Photo/Diario de Nuevo Laredo

Photo Credit: AP Photo/Diario de Nuevo Laredo

Read more here in Gizmodo and compare with this article on Mexico's Geolocalization Law (2012).

Transient

"....SelfScreens covers the latest in all things wearable technology. We do it all - from being the first to find the latest and greatest Glassware (via our site GoogleGlassFans), to providing you with easy-to-follow how-to guides to unlock your Android Wear device's full potential. "

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Image: Tinke

"...The use of reflective technology raised a critical challenge where natural light enters through a person's fingernail and is detected by the light detector. In order to ensure an accurate measurement is made, Tinké is packed with a comprehensive set of signal processing algorithms designed to treat the signals detected and filter all background signals.* "

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Full article here.

"Film and television have long been at the forefront of creativity and innovation – especially when it comes to technology.

That might be hard to believe in the age of Hollywood reboots and sequels, but it wasn’t long ago that TV shows were pushing the boundaries and blowing our minds with gadgets beyond our wildest dreams.

Star Trek is often the first program people think of, with innovations like the personal communicator (mobile phone) and automatic door now a part of our everyday lives, but one of the most well known (and possibly least credited) programs to predict life in the future was The Jetsons, which first beamed into homes in 1962.

Though created for children, the program included fantastical predictions of what life in the year 2063 might be like, capturing the imaginations of both adults and kids alike. That date may still be a long way off, but many of the predicted technologies are already here, especially in the home. From robotic vacuum cleaners to flat screens TVs and video conferencing, here are some predictions that actually came true."

We're moving closer to the ultimate ID... it not only moves with you, but will be in you.