Vint Cerf, the living legend largely responsible for the development of the Internet protocol suite, has some concerns about history. In his current column for the Communications of the ACM, Cerf worries about the decreasing longevity of our media, and, thus, about our ability as a civilization to self-document—to have a historical record that one day far in the future might be remarked upon and learned from. Magnetic films do not quite have the staying power as clay tablets.

At stake, according to Cerf, is “the possibility that the centuries well before ours will be better known than ours will be unless we are persistent about preserving digital content. The earlier media seem to have a kind of timeless longevity while modern media from the 1800s forward seem to have shrinking lifetimes. Just as the monks and Muslims of the Middle Ages preserved content by copying into new media, won’t we need to do the same for our modern content?”

As media becomes more ephemeral across technological generations, the more it depends on the technological generation that comes next.

Also, depends on the mindset of the generation that comes next too... What if we don't even want to remember?

Source: http://motherboard.vice.com/read/vint-cerf...

"University of Washington researchers have been able to send one person's thoughts through a computer to control the hand movement of another person sitting a short distance away, Mashable reports.

This brain-to-brain communication was first tried in 2013 but the process is now more refined.

In the latest experiment, researchers used three pairs of people, with each person attached to specially designed skull caps with a range of sensors which were connected via a computer.

The participants sat in front of a computer game in which a city was under siege.

In the test, one person was told to fire a canon to defend the city, but they could only think of the movement required rather than touch the controls.

The idea of the test was to determine if the hand of the other person in the separate room would move to touch the controls.

The test was not a complete success. Researchers said accuracy varied from 25 per cent to 83 per cent.

Researchers say total mind control is still a long way off."

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 Source: http://www.abc.net.au/tv/bigideas/stories/2014/09/04/4081183.htm

Source: http://www.abc.net.au/tv/bigideas/stories/2014/09/04/4081183.htm

 Source: http://www.iq2oz.com/debates/we-are-becoming-enslaved-by-our-technology-/

Source: http://www.iq2oz.com/debates/we-are-becoming-enslaved-by-our-technology-/

 Source: http://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/bigideas/enslaved-by-our-technology3f/5598912

Source: http://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/bigideas/enslaved-by-our-technology3f/5598912

 Source: http://www.acola.org.au/index.php/news/70-we-are-becoming-enslaved-by-our-technology

Source: http://www.acola.org.au/index.php/news/70-we-are-becoming-enslaved-by-our-technology

For the full article visit here

Posted
AuthorKatina Michael

AR

"...

Hi friends!

If you're in Toronto, please pick up a copy of today's Toronto Star newspaper (Thurs Sept 19)--I'm featured in the Business section! It's a special edition of the newspaper with Augmented Reality. Download the free Layar app on your smartphone or tablet and you can see additional content appear right on top of the newspaper, including a special video with me :)"

Read more 

 

Posted
Authoralexanderhayes

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"Patients having deep brain stimulation (DBS) are fitted with a neurostimulator, a device similar to a heart pacemaker, which is connected to electrodes placed in certain parts of the brain.
The electrical implant is connected to a small battery under the skin in the person's chest or abdomen to generate small electrical signals to stimulate the brain. 
This is controlled by a hand-held device which can be switched on and off. 
When switched on, the patient benefits from the blocking of abnormal nerve signals which trigger the disabling symptoms.
The operation costs around £30,000 and is currently only considered on the NHS for patients with very advanced disease. 
The latest trial using a DBS system made by US firm Medtronic is the first to look at patients with early symptoms. 
After two years, those having surgery and drugs had a 26 per cent improvement in quality of life compared with drugs alone and a range of other advances."
Transient
Transient
"But remember the dual nature of potent symbols: we have other fears to which Glass may present itself as a remedy. We fear missing out on what transpires online, and Glass promises to bring the Internet right in front of our eyes so we will never have to miss anything again. We fear experiences may pass by without our documenting them, and Glass promises the power to document our experience pervasively. If we fear being watched, Glass at least allows us to feel as if we can join the watchers. And behind these particular fears are more primal, longstanding fears: the fear of loneliness and isolation, the fear of death, the fear of insecurity and vulnerability. Glass answers to these as well."

Read more of the thought-provoking LM Sacasas article here

 "The March of Science": Alexander Leydenfrost (1952)

"The March of Science": Alexander Leydenfrost (1952)

[ image: hclilab ]

"...The 4th Augmented Human (AH) International Conference will be held in Stuttgart, Germany, on March 7–8 2013, focusing on augmenting human capabilities through technology for increased well-being and enjoyable human experience.

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"...The "2045" Initiative was founded by Dmitry Itskov in February 2011 in partnership with leading Russian scientists.

The main objectives of the Initiative are: the creation of a new vision of human development that meets global challenges humanity faces today, realization of the possibility of a radical extension of human life by means of cybernetic technology, as well as the formation of a new culture associated with these technologies.

The "2045" team is working towards creating an international research center where leading scientists will be engaged in research and development in the fields of anthropomorphic robotics, living systems modeling and brain and consciousness modeling with the goal of transferring one’s individual consciousness to an artificial carrier and achieving cybernetic immortality.

An annual congress "The Global Future 2045" is organized  by the Initiative to give platform for  discussing  mankind's evolutionary strategy based on technologies of cybernetic immortality as well as the possible impact of such technologies on global society, politics and economies of the future."

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"...Dr. James Hughes is not only the executive director of the Institute for Ethics and Emerging Technologies (IEET) but also a well known book author and transhumanist. I enjoyed having him on the show and will probably ask him to come back.

During our conversation with Dr. Hughes we cover a wide variety of topics such as: what is the IEET and what does it do; the story behind James' interest in technology, policy, philosophy and bio/ethics; why transhumanist atheists are often drawn to Buddhism; his first book Citizen Cyborg and his upcoming Cyborg Buddha; transhumanism and his definition thereof; whether optimism is rational; the impact of artificial intelligence on transhumanism; James' take on the technological singularity and our chances of surviving it; the benefits of biology; moral enhancement and animal uplift."

Lots more on Singularity here.

 

[ image: serif-industries ]

"...Four British professional and scientific bodies–the Academy of Medical Sciences, the British Academy, the Royal Academy of Engineering, and the Royal Society–have gone public with their alarm over the potential pitfalls of augmented humanity in a joint report entitled Human Enhancement and the Future of Work. (BBC news item, Telegraph news item)".

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Some further reading

"...Our passion for making life better for people using brainwave technology is what sparked InteraXon’s drive to create Muse. Advances in EEG technology means it is now accessible, portable, affordable, and no longer limited to medical labs. We knew there was a need for a brainwave sensor that merged beautiful design with robust software."