"...In football-mad Argentina, fans are known for belting out an almost amorous chant to their favourite clubs: "I carry you inside me!" First-division side Tigre said it had decided to take that to the next level and is offering fans implantable microchips that will open the stadium turnstiles on match days, no ticket or ID required. "Carrying the club inside you won't just be a metaphor," the club wrote on its Twitter account. - Read more

https://www.youtube.com/watch?t=42&v=Dyk9Xnj4_5U

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ekP7LBeM5qE

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Cn5u50A153w

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1yjHwb1cbnQ

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NnmHZXvJhlk

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dxhoLxRYsRU

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4oeFBGFzcrg

 

"Peter just joined the growing network of biohackers that are curious to find out how we can combine technology with biology. What to do with NFC in your hand? That's like the same question you ask when you ask: 'What to do with a ac/dc-socket?' It depends which kind of device you plug in. Endless possibilities like storing Bitcoins in your body or opening an NFC-enabled door :)

This chip is developed by Amal Graafstra. The guy that helped Peter is Tom van Oudenaarde, a piercing artist who is experienced with implanting stuff under your skinn. Always aks this kind of experts to help and never try it yourself :)"

singularityu.org/
diamandis.com/
exponentialorgs.com/
dangerousthings.com/
twitter.com/piercingutrecht

Thank you KMA and BW.

From this article here

"McCauley is a hacker at heart and has no qualms about experimenting on himself to prove a point. So, in the middle of his talk, he called piercing professional Tom van Oudenaarde onstage and announced he’d be implanting a chip in his hand.

Was he nervous? A little. But by all accounts the procedure was quick and relatively painless. In fact, so much so that Singularity University cofounder, Peter Diamandis, walked onstage an hour later and got chipped too.

The chip—a radio frequency identification (RFID) tag encased in a biocompatible glass cylinder the size of a grain of rice—was implanted in a three-minute procedure, start to finish, and left a small puncture wound and a bit of soreness.

To be clear, neither the technology nor the procedure is particularly novel. Vets have been implanting pets and livestock with RFID chips for a couple decades, and human RFID implants have been happening since at least the mid-2000s.

So, why get one? According to Diamandis, it was a spur-of-the-moment experiment to see how he’d feel having a piece of technology in his body. But he thinks that implantables, in general, could offer much more.

“In all honesty, I think biohacking, the cyborg human, is an eventuality that will materialize when the value proposition gets high enough,” Diamandis wrote in a recent blog post about his new implant.

RFID chips are passive bits of hardware powered and activated when near an RFID reader. Most people have experienced them at one time or another—cards granting access to an office or onto the subway or a bus.

Diamandis suggests near-term uses of RFID implants might be smooth interaction with the Internet of Things. We could use our hands to unlock doors, start the car, and pay for coffee. McCauley says we might keep contact information on our chip, swap said information by shaking hands—like an embedded business card.

Some of these applications are still in the future. The number of connected devices in our everyday lives are yet minimal enough that most of us wouldn’t get much use out of an embedded chip. And whether embedding it would be an improvement on keeping it somewhere outside our bodies, like on a card or in our phone, is an open question.

That said, the number of devices we might control with an implant is set to grow in the coming years. And the truly compelling “value proposition” may lie elsewhere—in health and medicine."

Thanks OG and KMA.

My observation? How long before this technology becomes mainstream? And then even the body-modders might be asking themselves that the 'group' they identify with is no longer unique... implantables, like tattoos, like piercing are about being 'different' but also the 'same'... But when everybody has one, even the boring old banks, will the body-modders really want one? "Yes" if it means customisation, and "no" if they think it means conformity to the masses.

le matins.jpg

"Ils portent le nom de leur amour sous leur peau

Un studio de tatouage à Zürich propose l'implant de micropuces électroniques lisibles via un smartphone. Une première en Suisse qui fait débat.

Mis à jour le 13.09.2014

Laura Juliano"

More here

 

Now compare with the football tattoo craze here and rugby league tattoo craze here.

 Telegraph.uk

Telegraph.uk

 CanberraTimes

CanberraTimes



 Source http://www.smh.com.au/technology/sci-tech/microchip-implant-ahead-of-iphone-6-release-20140906-10cx9c.html

Source http://www.smh.com.au/technology/sci-tech/microchip-implant-ahead-of-iphone-6-release-20140906-10cx9c.html

With a wave of his left hand, Ben Slater can open his front door, turn on the lights and will soon be able to start his car. Without even a touch he can link to databases containing limitless information, including personal details such as names, addresses and health records.
The digital advertising director has joined a small number of Australians who have inserted microchips into their skin to be at the cutting edge of the next stage of the evolution of technology.
Mr Slater was prompted to be implanted in anticipation of the iPhone 6 release on September 9.
The conjecture among pundits and fans worldwide over what chief executive Tim Cook will reveal is building.
At present the iPhone cannot read microchip implants. However, Mr Slater believes the new version will have that capability. His confidence is now lodged between his thumb and forefinger. 
He flew to Melbourne two weeks ago for a booking at a tattoo parlour to have the microchip inserted. The number of Australians microchipping themselves is very small but growing since its biohacking beginnings 10 years ago, and most rely on piercing experts to conduct the procedure.

The following post has been sourced from research conducted on TrendHunter. Please see: http://www.trendhunter.com/ A lot has transpired since I wrote about aspects of this in my thesis (2003) and a subsequent article with MG Michael in 2006 for the CATAC conference here titled: "Towards Chipification: The Multifunctional Body Art of the Net Generation."

Brands, marks, tattoos and scarification in particular have been around since ancient times but this kind of 'insane body modification' for those wishing to 'extremely transform' themselves is something beyond mere eccentricity. What is this spirit of body modification that has begun to creep into everyday life? What does it mean? Being an 'individual' and 'different' and 'unique' in the crowd is something that is often cited as a reason for implantation- the question remains that if increasingly people adopt these 'technologies' and they become the 'norm' in everyday applications like implants for electronic payment, will these body-modders continue to like their own mods or rush to get them removed? 

"This top list of insane body modifications is full of extremely transformed people. Piercings are no longer simply for the ears and tattoos seem too tame compared to some of these featured mods. Tongue splitting, ear shaping and horn implants are just some of the wild body modifications you'll find in this top list. If you're looking for inspiration for your next transformational makeover, these eccentric features are just what you need. Implications - consumers are resorting to body modification as a method to express their individualism. Consumers want to feel as though they're unique in comparison to their peers. As such, corporations may consider offering personalized customization options for their goods."

Source: Francis Tiangson here

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"Biomechanical Tattoos Seem to be Part of the Body: Biomechanical tattoos are a genre of body modification that reveals “mechanical” and “robotic” images underneath the flesh that seem to be part of the human body. The elaborate biomechanical tattoos are “rising very fast in popularity as the blend between man and machine is becoming ever closer. A relatively new style of tattoo, biomechanical tattoos use some of the most cutting-edge technology in the tattoo industry. I am not much for tattoos, but the awe-inspiring beauty of biomechanical tattoos cannot be denied."

Source: Lordes Sanchez Bayas here

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