Source:  BioHax

Source: BioHax

“…Biohax have installed thousands of professionals world wide in the financial, healthcare, government, science, and technologysectors. Biohax have enabled their carriers to increase their security in the digital world, provide 100% identification clearance, and unlimited seamless experiences with their connected surroundings.” - BioHax

Computer security expert and privacy specialist Bruce Schneier writes:

The Internet of Things is the name given to the computerization of everything in our lives. Already you can buy Internet-enabled thermostats, light bulbs, refrigerators, and cars. Soon everything will be on the Internet: the things we own, the things we interact with in public, autonomous things that interact with each other.

These “things” will have two separate parts. One part will be sensors that collect data about us and our environment. Already our smartphones know our location and, with their onboard accelerometers, track our movements. Things like our thermostats and light bulbs will know who is in the room. Internet-enabled street and highway sensors will know how many people are out and about­ — and eventually who they are. Sensors will collect environmental data from all over the world.

The other part will be actuators. They’ll affect our environment. Our smart thermostats aren’t collecting information about ambient temperature and who’s in the room for nothing; they set the temperature accordingly. Phones already know our location, and send that information back to Google Maps and Waze to determine where traffic congestion is; when they’re linked to driverless cars, they’ll automatically route us around that congestion. Amazon already wants autonomous drones to deliver packages. The Internet of Things will increasingly perform actions for us and in our name.

Increasingly, human intervention will be unnecessary. The sensors will collect data. The system’s smarts will interpret the data and figure out what to do. And the actuators will do things in our world. You can think of the sensors as the eyes and ears of the Internet, the actuators as the hands and feet of the Internet, and the stuff in the middle as the brain. This makes the future clearer. The Internet now senses, thinks, and acts.

We’re building a world-sized robot, and we don’t even realize it.
Source: https://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/201...
tv watches us.png

"George Orwell would be proud. Earlier this week Propublica discovered that more than 10 million Vizio televisions silently record what their owners are watching and send a live-stream of their viewing habits to a commercial company that uses it to profile them. Most disturbingly, Vizio ties this viewing information to the user’s IP address, allowing their offline interests to be used to target them with advertisements in the online world.

According to Vizio, the company uses this information to offer advertisers “highly specific viewing behavior data on a massive scale with great accuracy” thatrepresents a “revolutionary shift across all screens that brings measurability, relevancy and personalization to the consumer like never before.” Security vendor Avast published an analysis on Wednesday that dissects the data stream Vizio sends back, showing that it is essentially a low-resolution screen capture taken at regular intervals of whatever is on the screen at that moment.

Yet, for all of the uproar this discovery has caused, it is just part of a broader trend of humans being intricately profiled through the digital trails they leave. Hospitals and insurance companies are beginning to explore using public records and credit card purchase data to determine how healthy you are being in your daily life. For example, buying a pack of cigarettes at the gas station, buying donuts on the way home, stopping off at a fast food restaurant for lunch, or letting your gym membership lapse could all be reported back to your doctor and potentially used to increase your insurance rates.

More here

What an impressive suite of services BMW drivers can enjoy with their new car! Imagine the data being collected by private car companies today and wait till the IOT makes all of this data collection standardised through related ITS policies. BMW's suite of apps include:

1. BMW ConnectedDrive basic features

a. ConnectedDrive Services (SA6AK)

b. Intelligent Emergency Call (SA6AC)

c. BMW TeleServices (SA6AE)

2. Real Time Traffic Information (SA6AM)

3. Remote Services (SA6AP)

4. Concierge Services (SA6AN)

5. Internet (SA6AR)

6. Online Entertainment (SA6FV)

More here.

Full article here.

"Film and television have long been at the forefront of creativity and innovation – especially when it comes to technology.

That might be hard to believe in the age of Hollywood reboots and sequels, but it wasn’t long ago that TV shows were pushing the boundaries and blowing our minds with gadgets beyond our wildest dreams.

Star Trek is often the first program people think of, with innovations like the personal communicator (mobile phone) and automatic door now a part of our everyday lives, but one of the most well known (and possibly least credited) programs to predict life in the future was The Jetsons, which first beamed into homes in 1962.

Though created for children, the program included fantastical predictions of what life in the year 2063 might be like, capturing the imaginations of both adults and kids alike. That date may still be a long way off, but many of the predicted technologies are already here, especially in the home. From robotic vacuum cleaners to flat screens TVs and video conferencing, here are some predictions that actually came true."

For the full article visit here

Posted
AuthorKatina Michael
Source: The Institute (IEEE News Source)  http://theinstitute.ieee.org/technology-focus/technology-topic/the-value-of-privacy

Source: The Institute (IEEE News Source)

http://theinstitute.ieee.org/technology-focus/technology-topic/the-value-of-privacy

"A PRECAUTIONARY TALE

Not all are as optimistic as Prasad about the future of the IoT. While users may have control over who in the general public sees their information, the bigger concern for consumer privacy expert Katherine Albrecht is the question of who owns the data. She is an executive with StartPage, a search engine that does not collect or share personal information, and StartMail, an encrypted e-mail service.

An article coauthored with IEEE Senior Member Katina Michael, “Connected: To Everyone and Everything,” in the Winter 2013 issue of IEEE Technology and Society Magazine, puts Albrecht’s concern bluntly: “[Consumers] may think we’re in charge of our shopper cards and our mobile apps and our smart fridges—but … let’s not fool ourselves. [The information] is not ours. It belongs to Google, and IBM, and Cisco Systems…and the global Mega-Corp that owns your local supermarket. If you don’t believe us, just try removing ‘your’ data from their databases.”

Michael is the associate dean international of the University of Wollongong Faculty of Engineering and Information Sciences, in Australia, and editor in chief of IEEE Technology and Society Magazine.

To prepare for the interconnected future, businesses and governments are outlining measures to be taken while new policies are developed. The European Union, for example, outlined such measures in its report “IoT Privacy, Data Protection, Information Security,” published in January 2013. One recommendation is to develop privacy-friendly default settings on IoT products and services that would give users more control over what information is shared with others. Furthermore, it suggests that IoT networks give individuals the rights to their own data. In 2012, participants at the Open IoT Assembly—an initiative to envision a future with the IoT—developed an “IoT Bill of Rights” at a two-day conference in London that calls for transparency of IoT processes and the preservation of privacy. It also calls for people to have access to their personal data.

Despite potential risks to privacy, companies are betting their customers will see the advantages that the IoT will bring them, says Colcher. But some groups advocate that consumers have the power to slow down or even stop the advancement of the IoT. Not Colcher. “The inclusion of the IoT all around us is inevitable,” he says. “The only thing to do now is to prepare the best we can.”"