"Remember, Google introduced Calico to the world with the bold ambition of "curing death." CEO Larry Page, Google Ventures head honcho Bill Maris, and futurist Ray Kurzweil, who Google hired as its director of engineering, have all expressed a deep interest in radical life extension and the Singularity. Up until today we haven't had a lot of detail about how Calico would pursue that goal. Page had told Time, "One of the things I thought was amazing is that if you solve cancer, you’d add about three years to people’s average life expectancy. We think of solving cancer as this huge thing that’ll totally change the world. But when you really take a step back and look at it, yeah, there are many, many tragic cases of cancer, and it’s very, very sad, but in the aggregate, it’s not as big an advance as you might think.""

More here

 Source: http://www.cnet.com/au/news/poll-would-you-go-full-cyborg/#!.

Source: http://www.cnet.com/au/news/poll-would-you-go-full-cyborg/#!.

Stop the Cyborgs commented on this piece by Morrison as follows:

stopthecyborgsJun 7, 2013

"The issue is not "wearable tech", "implantable tech" or even full on artificial bodies. Prosthetics like prosthetic limbs, cochlear implants, pacemakers and enhancements like bottlenose which deliver extra senses are just an extension of human use of tools and medicine. It could be argued that humans have always been cyborgs in some sense. 

Unfortunately the current trajectory of development is: Überveillance and locked down systems tied into corporate controlled servers in the cloud. This means that the coming flood of devices will not be enhancements which you control or even stand alone systems which you can trust to do their job (even though you don't know what code they contain) but rather systems which report data to insurers, health care providers, employers, security services and which can be remotely controlled. The issue is therefore to what degree are you allow systems which make up your body to be externally controlled and therefore the degree to which you are prepared to give up fundamental freedom and agency in exchange for performance or connectivity. 

So here are some future possibilities: 

(1) Your life logging memories stored in the cloud are turned over by the 3rd party host in response to a legal request. 

(2) Your employer asks you to have an implant or use a wearable device. You feel that you will not be promoted and they may find a reason to sack you if you refuse. The implant monitors your movements away from work. 

(3) Your implant monitors compliance with your medical regime. Because you did not obey the doctors instructions to the letter you are classified as 'bad' and denied future medication or insurance coverage.

(4) Your extra special bionic eyes are remotely disabled turning you blind because you were at an anti government demonstration.

(5) Your legs are remotely disabled crippling you because of a payment dispute with the vendor."

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

More on Ingress 

I first came across location based role playing games (LBRPG) when I was researching for an ISTAS11 presentation done via Skype.

More recently I wrote this article which touched on some of the issues of knowing when AR has gone too far- real, not real? Who knows... and that's the real problem!

Check out aimbot below... that video is not for the queezy...


Transient

"Google is on a shopping spree, buying startup after startup to push its business into the future. But these companies don’t run web services or sell ads or build smartphone software or dabble in other things that Google is best known for. The web’s most powerful company is filling its shopping cart with artificial intelligence algorithms, robots, and smart gadgets for the home. It’s on a mission to build an enormous digital brain that operates as much like the human mind as possible — and, in many ways, even better.

Yesterday, Google confirmed that it has purchased a stealthy artificial intelligence startup calledDeepMind. According to reports, the company paid somewhere in the mid-hundreds of millions of dollars for the British outfit. Though Google didn’t discuss the price tag, that enormous figure is in line with the rest of its recent activity.

Lifelike robots, sentient machines, the Jetsons’ smart home in the sky. Google is spending billions to make itself the place where these fantasies become facts.

The DeepMind acquisition closely follows Google’s $3.2 billion purchase of smart thermostat and smoke alarm maker Nest, a slew of cutting-edge robotics companies, and another AI startup known as DNNresearch.

Google is looking to spread smart computer hardware into so many parts of our everyday lives — from our homes and our cars to our bodies — but perhaps more importantly, it’s developing a new type of artificial intelligence that can help operate these devices, as well as its many existing web and smartphone services.

Though Google is out in front of this AI arms race, others are moving in the same direction. Facebook, IBM, and Microsoft are doubling down on artificial intelligence too, and are snapping up fresh AI talent. According to The Information, Mark Zuckerberg and company were also trying to acquire DeepMind."

Read more

It is with great joy that MG and I write to let you know that the Uberveillance edited volume is finally in stores and available for purchase. We encourage you to ask your libraries to purchase the volume. Of significance are the coming together of well-known voices in the surveillance field to discuss the definition and impact of uberveillance, including Katherine Albrecht, Roger Clarke, Mark Gasson, Kevin Haggerty, Steve Mann, Ellen McGee, Kevin Warwick, Marcus Wigan and numerous authorities on the topic of microchipping people. This volume contains 17 book chapters, and 7 interviews and panel presentations as well as full referencing of source materials in some 500 pages.

 "Uberveillance" edited volume by Michael and Michael (2014)

"Uberveillance" edited volume by Michael and Michael (2014)

 

CONTENTS PAGE

PART A The Veillances

Chapter 1 Introduction: On the “Birth” of Uberveillance  (pages 1-31) M. G. Michael (University of Wollongong, Australia)

Chapter 2 Veillance: Beyond Surveillance, Dataveillance, Uberveillance, and the Hypocrisy of One-Sided Watching  (pages 32-45) Steve Mann (University of Toronto, Canada)

Chapter 3 Uberveillance: Where Wear and Educative Arrangement  (pages 46-62) Alexander Hayes (University of Wollongong, Australia)

PART B Applications of Humancentric Implantables

Chapter 4 Practical Experimentation with Human Implants  (pages 64-132) Kevin Warwick (University of Reading, UK), Mark N. Gasson (University of Reading, UK)

Chapter 5 Knowledge Recovery: Applications of Technology and Memory  (pages 133-142) Maria E. Burke (University of Salford, UK), Chris Speed (University of Edinburgh, UK)

PART C Adoption of RFID Implants for Humans

Chapter 6 Willingness to Adopt RFID Implants: Do Personality Factors Play a Role in the Acceptance of Uberveillance?  (pages 144-168) Christine Perakslis (Johnson and Wales University, USA)

Chapter 7 Surveilling the Elderly: Emerging Demographic Needs and Social Implications of RFID Chip Technology Use  (pages 169-185) Randy Basham (University of Texas – Arlington, USA)

PART D Tracking and Tracing Laws, Directives, Regulations, and Standards

Chapter 8 Towards the Blanket Coverage DNA Profiling and Sampling of Citizens in England, Wales, and Northern Ireland  (pages 187-207) Katina Michael (University of Wollongong, Australia)

Chapter 9 ID Scanners and Überveillance in the Night-Time Economy: Crime Prevention or Invasion of Privacy?  (pages 208-225) Darren Palmer (Deakin University, Australia), Ian Warren (Deakin University, Australia), Peter Miller (Deakin University, Australia)

Chapter 10 Global Tracking Systems in the Australian Interstate Trucking Industry  (pages 226-234) Jann Karp (C.C.C. Australia, Australia)

Chapter 11 Tracking Legislative Developments in Relation to “Do Not Track” Initiatives  (pages 235-259) Brigette Garbin (University of Queensland, Australia), Kelly Staunton (University of Queensland, Australia), Mark Burdon (University of Queensland, Australia)

Chapter 12 Uberveillance, Standards, and Anticipation: A Case Study on Nanobiosensors in U.S. Cattle  (pages 260-279) Kyle Powys Whyte (Michigan State University, USA), Monica List (Michigan State University, USA), John V. Stone (Michigan State University, USA), Daniel Grooms (Michigan State University, USA), Stephen Gasteyer (Michigan State University, USA), Paul B. Thompson (Michigan State University, USA), Lawrence Busch (Michigan State University, USA), Daniel Buskirk (Michigan State University, USA), Erica Giorda (Michigan State University, USA), Hilda Bouri (Michigan State University, USA)

PART E Health Implications of Microchipping Living Things

Chapter 13 Microchip-Induced Tumors in Laboratory Rodents and Dogs: A Review of the Literature 1990–2006  (pages 281-317) Katherine Albrecht (CASPIAN Consumer Privacy, USA)

PART F Socio-Ethical Implications of RFID Tags and Transponders

Chapter 14 Privacy and Pervasive Surveillance: A Philosophical Analysis  (pages 319-350) Alan Rubel (University of Wisconsin – Madison, USA)

Chapter 15 Neuroethics and Implanted Brain Machine Interfaces  (pages 351-365) Ellen M. McGee (Independent Researcher, USA)

Chapter 16 We Are the Borg! Human Assimilation into Cellular Society  (pages 366-407) Ronnie D. Lipschutz (University of California - Santa Cruz, USA), Rebecca J. Hester (University of Texas Medical Branch, USA)

Chapter 17 Uberveillance and Faith-Based Organizations: A Renewed Moral Imperative  (pages 408-416) Marcus Wigan (Oxford Systematics, Australia & Edinburgh Napier University, UK)

Acronyms and Abbreviations

Compilation of References

About the Contributors

Index

EDITORIAL ADVISORY BOARD

Roba Abbas, University of Wollongong, Australia

Greg Adamson, University of Melbourne, Australia

Katherine Albrecht, CASPIAN, USA

Anas Aloudat, University of Jordan, Jordan

Michael V. Arnold, University of Melbourne, Australia

Emilia Belleboni, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Spain

Rafael Capurro, University of Wisconsin – Milwaukee, USA

Kenneth Foster, University of Pennsylvania, USA

Amal Graafstra, Amal.net, USA

Mireille Hildebrandt, Erasmus University Rotterdam, The Netherlands

Peter Hyland, University of Wollongong, Australia

Nicholas Huber, Accenture, Australia

Indrawati, Institut Manajemen Telkom, Indonesia

Eleni Kosta, K. U. Leuven, Belgium

Ronald Leenes, Tilburg University, The Netherlands

Avner Levin, Ryerson University, Canada

Michael Loui, University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign, USA

Noëmi Manders-Huits, Delft University of Technology, The Netherlands

Keith W. Miller, University of Missouri – St. Louis, USA

Lyria Bennett Moses, University of New South Wales, Australia

Christine Perakslis, Johnson and Wales University, USA

Laura Perusco, Macquarie Bank, UK

Kenneth Pimple, Indiana University – Bloomington, USA

Joseph Savirimuthu, University of Liverpool, UK

Alan D. Smith, Robert Morris University, USA

Charles Smith, Mesa State College Alumni, USA

Judith Symonds, Auckland University of Technology, New Zealand

Samuel Fosso Wamba, Rouen Business School, France

John Weckert, Charles Sturt University, Australia

 

HOW TO CITE THE VOLUME

MLA Style

Michael, M.G. and Katina Michael. "Uberveillance and the Social Implications of Microchip Implants: Emerging Technologies." IGI Global, 2014. 1-509. Web. 24 Dec. 2013. doi:10.4018/978-1-4666-4582-0

APA Style

Michael, M., & Michael, K. (2014). Uberveillance and the Social Implications of Microchip Implants: Emerging Technologies (pp. 1-509). Hershey, PA: IGI Global. doi:10.4018/978-1-4666-4582-0

Chicago Style

Michael, M.G. and Katina Michael. "Uberveillance and the Social Implications of Microchip Implants: Emerging Technologies." 1-509 (2014), accessed December 24, 2013. doi:10.4018/978-1-4666-4582-0

Compare these scenes from Enemy of the State (1998) with the video posted by Katina Michael on Communications of the ACM regarding the limits of watching.

"We're there now!"  

 A scene from  Enemy of the State  (1998)

A scene from Enemy of the State (1998)

 A scene from  Enemy of the State   (1998)

A scene from Enemy of the State  (1998)

Now read this article on the limits of watching by Katina and MG Michael (2013) and watch the following report as an addendum to the article.

 Covert HD Audio-Visual Recording Pen purchased in 2011

Covert HD Audio-Visual Recording Pen purchased in 2011

Read more 

 Courtesy: Empire North

Courtesy: Empire North

"On paper you can invent anything. The difficult part is bringing what is on paper to life, or so it would seem. Empire North, is an intriguing slice of docu-fiction that explores this very notion of creativity, and in doing so attempts to break down the barriers between life and art. Danish artist Jakob Boesko directs and stars as Jakob Valdason, a cartoonist who conceives of a fictitious futuristic rifle called the ID Sniper; a high-powered weapon that can implant a GPS microchip into the body of a human being. The rifle works as a long distance injector with the microchip entering the body causing no internal damage and only a small amount of physical pain; that equal to a mosquito bite.
Valdason creates a new identity for himself; no longer is he Jakob Valdason, the poor cartoonist, but rather Jakob Valdason, the polished CEO of the fabricated weapons company, Empire North. With his new persona, along with a prototype for his ID Sniper, Valdason travels to a weapons fair in Qatar to unveil his futuristic rifle to the international weapons community. His objective: to take a product from the future with a combination of technologies not yet seen, bring into the present, and see if people accept it as real.
With Empire North, Jakob Boesko gives us a brief glimpse into the unsettling realities of the international arms trade. Over 1.5 trillion dollars are spent on military expenditures worldwide annually, in what is essentially a deceiving competition to uncover the next big weapon of the future. When foreign developers begin to flock to Valdason and Empire North; when his indox becomes overwhelmed with interested parties ranging from developers, investors, and military officials, reality sets in that while the ID Sniper is a fallacy, the fascination around it and what it could potential provide, is anything but fallacious. In describing the modern world during a voice over, Valdason is quoted in saying, ‘this is the decade of deception, the era of fiction’, and no where is this supposition more prevalent than in the international arms trade, where the global jockeying for control can often eclipse any form of moral compass. Where profits and power can dominate in the name of security, safety, and rights of freedoms." 

I couldn't help myself but narrate my own version of events... typically if we believe UNIQUL then the following is also possible. Hope you enjoy my take on the plausible narration!  Watch the 'film' and read what I've written.

 

Scenario 1: The store

"Imagine coming to a store, and you think your wallet is already there. You pick up your things, approach to the checkout, give a meaningful nod, and then are told you cannot buy your groceries because you have no money left in your bank account to make that transaction because you are the victim of a cyber-attack- someone has stolen your biometrics." 

"Imagine you go to the police, and they tell you the transaction was less than $1000 and that police resources are better spent fighting drug problems on the street. You leave the station and you fully comprehend that there is NO way to change your face because it is NOT like changing your VISA card." 

 

Scenario 2: Catching a flight

 "Imagine you are late to your plane... there is a huge queue... you try to instantly check in... and as you are photographed to make that 6.30 am flight, you are stopped by border control and told you are under arrest for suspected terrorism charges. Your image has been muddled up with someone else and you cannot see your wife and family for 48 hours while you are under interrogation. You tell them you are NOT the one, but the algorithm says you are."

 

Scenario 3: Paying for Petrol

"Imagine you drive to the petrol station. You casually fuel your tank. And as you look at the payment screen you are given a warning by your boss- 'YOU ARE LATE FOR WORK, YET AGAIN! YOU ARE FIRED'... It dawns on you, that you cannot pay for your rent and you cannot pay for your fuel any longer. You are forced to leave your vehicle behind... there is not enough petrol to make it home."

 

Scenario 4: Buying Clothing

"Imagine, the shop where all those magic things came to life. You go into the store with your friends... just to show it off.. and as you enter you get checked in by a facial recognition camera, and are seen purchasing upmarket clothing. Well, this is not fiction any more. Everyone is smiling, and you think you are real cool... you all have a Finalqul account... that is until you press the OKAY key, and an alarm bell rings and you are accused of shoplifting 5 days prior, because of a false match against the biometric database. You try to tell your friends you are innocent... but they just walk away and desert you calling you an absolute loser. Processing takes under a second but you spend years trying to clear your name."

 

CLOSE

"Hi. I'm your worst enemy FINALQUL [machine inspired by WITCHCRAFT]". 

 

Thanks Huffington Post for reporting on this story on this page. The article in HuffPost was written by Betty Isaacson. 

 Image: BKRW

Image: BKRW

War changes everything. War is an apocalypse and a technological revolution and a life-changing adventure, all rolled into one. So it's not surprising that many of science fiction's most indelible stories are about warfare.

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Eliezer S. Yudkowsky* wrote about an experiment which had to do with Artificial Inteligence. In a near future, man will have given birth to machines that are able to rewrite their codes, to improve themselves, and, why not, to dispense with them. This idea sounded a little bit distant to some critic voices, so an experiment was to be done: keep the AI sealed in a box from which it could not get out except by one mean: convincing a human guardian to let it out.
What if, as Yudkowsky states, ‘Humans are not secure’? Could we chess match our best creation to grant our own survival? Would man be humble enough to accept he was superseded, to look for primitive ways to find himself back, to cure himself from a disease that’s on his own genes? How to capture a force we voluntarily set free? What if mankind worst enemy were humans?
In a near future, we will cease to be the dominant race.
In a near future, we will learn to fear what is to come.

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[ image : richardmcwilliam ]

"...Cyborg Tim’s power supply was running low and he needed to top up with biomass.

He stood in the dinner queue.

“Tim!” his friend Ben shouted. “What are you eating?!”

Cyborg Tim didn’t know yet. He switched his nasal sensors to acute.

Hmm.

Ah!

Gravy, definitely gravy.

And he could detect meat – chicken, yes, chicken! he thought.

And sweat. Sweat wasn’t on the menu, was it?"

 

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