"Yahoo has filed a patent for a type of smart billboard that would collect people's information and use it to deliver targeted ad content in real-time."

To achieve that functionality, the billboards would use a variety of sensor systems, including cameras and proximity technology, to capture real-time audio, video and even biometric information about potential target audiences.

But the tech company doesn’t just want to know about a passing vehicle. It also wants to know who the occupants are inside of it.

That’s why Yahoo is prepared to cooperate with cell towers and telecommunications companies to learn as much as possible about each vehicle’s occupants.

It goes on to explain in the application:

Various types of data (e.g., cell tower data, mobile app location data, image data, etc.) can be used to identify specific individuals in an audience in position to view advertising content. Similarly, vehicle navigation/tracking data from vehicles equipped with such systems could be used to identify specific vehicles and/or vehicle owners. Demographic data (e.g., as obtained from a marketing or user database) for the audience can thus be determined for the purpose of, for example, determining whether and/or the degree to which the demographic profile of the audience corresponds to a target demographic.
Source: https://www.grahamcluley.com/yahoo-creepy-...

This short video explores how the online world has overwhelmingly become the popular outlet for public rage by briefly illustrating some of the many stories of everyday people which have suddenly become public enemy number one under the most misunderstood of circumstances and trivial narratives. With the web acting like a giant echo-chamber, amplifying false stories and feeding on the pent-up aggression of the audience watching the spectacle, The Outrage Machine shows how these systems froth the mob mentality into a hideous mess, as a good example of where the spectacle goes and how its intensity has to keep ratcheting up in order maintain the audience attention, in a culture of dwindling attention spans, distraction and triviality.

Filmmaker and author Jon Ronson also recently wrote a book about this topic too, which is quite good. So You've Been Publicly Shamed. His TED talk is essentially a 17 min overview:

And a longer presentation with interview and Q&A from earlier this year:

 Source: http://www.abc.net.au/tv/bigideas/stories/2014/09/04/4081183.htm

Source: http://www.abc.net.au/tv/bigideas/stories/2014/09/04/4081183.htm

 Source: http://www.iq2oz.com/debates/we-are-becoming-enslaved-by-our-technology-/

Source: http://www.iq2oz.com/debates/we-are-becoming-enslaved-by-our-technology-/

 Source: http://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/bigideas/enslaved-by-our-technology3f/5598912

Source: http://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/bigideas/enslaved-by-our-technology3f/5598912

 Source: http://www.acola.org.au/index.php/news/70-we-are-becoming-enslaved-by-our-technology

Source: http://www.acola.org.au/index.php/news/70-we-are-becoming-enslaved-by-our-technology

More on Ingress 

I first came across location based role playing games (LBRPG) when I was researching for an ISTAS11 presentation done via Skype.

More recently I wrote this article which touched on some of the issues of knowing when AR has gone too far- real, not real? Who knows... and that's the real problem!

Check out aimbot below... that video is not for the queezy...


"Welcome to the Stanford Prison Experiment web site, which features an extensive slide show and information about this classic psychology experiment.. What happens when you put good people in an evil place? Does humanity win over evil, or does evil triumph? These are some of the questions we posed in this dramatic simulation of prison life conducted in the summer of 1971 at Stanford University.

How we went about testing these questions and what we found may astound you. Our planned two-week investigation into the psychology of prison life had to be ended prematurely after only six days because of what the situation was doing to the college students who participated. In only a few days, our guards became sadistic and our prisoners became depressed and showed signs of extreme stress. Please join me on a slide tour describing this experiment and uncovering what it tells us about the nature of human nature.

--Philip G. Zimbardo"

The Quiet Rage documentary can be purchased here

anklet.gif

"The prisoner was then issued a uniform. The main part of this uniform was a dress, or smock, which each prisoner wore at all times with no underclothes. On the smock, in front and in back, was his prison ID number.  On each prisoner's right ankle was a heavy chain, bolted on and worn at all times. Rubber sandals were the footwear, and each prisoner covered his hair with a stocking cap made from a woman's nylon stocking." Courtesy of: http://www.prisonexp.org/

See also The Experiment (2010) a remake of the German Das Experiment (2001).