Groups of citizens wielding cameras take to the streets of New York to document the systemic police brutality and racism facing the public. The cops hate it and so they push back hard.

This is how police accountability plays out in the real world. Take heed Australia:

Source: http://copwatchnyc.org/

Axon creates connected technologies for truth in public safety.

"....TASER and Microsoft have formed a unique partnership that brings together two powerful technology platforms to meet the unique needs of law enforcement today. With unmatched technology innovation and industry-leading security, the partnership is enabling transformation in public safety practices while also promoting greater transparency and trust between law enforcement and private citizens."

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This man knows a lot about what is happening in this area - https://ccj.asu.edu/content/michael-white

Guess what's behind that wall?

More here

The use of technology that allows the police to "see" inside the homes of suspects has raised privacy questions.
At least 50 US police forces are believed to be equipped with radars that can send signals through walls.
The use of the radar device, known as Range-R, was made public in a Denver court late last year.
It was used by police entering a house to arrest a man who had violated the terms of his parole.
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In 2001, the Supreme Court ruled that police cannot use thermal cameras without a warrant, specifically noting that the rule would also apply to radar-based systems that were then being developed.
"The idea that government can send signals through the wall of your house to figure out what's inside is problematic," Christopher Soghoian, principal technologist for the American Civil Liberties Union told USA Today.
"Technologies that allow the police to look inside of a home are among the intrusive tools that police have."
Transient

"The father of a man fatally shot by police at an Ohio Wal-Mart says a phone call in which he heard his son's dying breaths keeps replaying in his head.

John Crawford III, was shot August 5, in a Wal-Mart. A 911 caller told police that Crawford III was waving a weapon that turned out to be an air rifle.

Officers have said Crawford III was shot when he didn't respond to orders to put the gun down.

His father, John Crawford Jr, talked about the last day of son's life to The Cincinnati Enquirer.

The Crawford family and their attorney have said that a section of store surveillance video they saw shows Crawford III holding the air rifle and talking on his mobile phone.

The family has requested public release of the store video. But Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine has refused to release it while the investigation is continuing."

More here

"A man walks through Wal-Mart, holding something to his ear as he passes a gun case.

He leans toward a shelf and steps back into view, now holding a long, dark object — a gun? — as he walks past customers, who show no obvious reaction.

Eight minutes later, surveillance video from a different angle shows him farther away.

Suddenly he drops the object and crumples to the floor. Two more people come into view, walking toward him with firearms drawn.

Was it a justified fatal shooting by police or an unreasonable use of force? Does the soundless video offer enough information to answer that question?

In the Wal-Mart case and others, cameras meant to help catch bad guys or document police actions are drawing attention for capturing officers using force.

The public circulation of those images increases transparency, but it also adds the risk of viewers rushing to judgment based on only part of the story.

"You might see a video and think that because you're seeing an actual sort of account of what happened, you know the whole story.

And it's very rare that a video is actually going to be able to tell the whole story," said Ric Simmons, an Ohio State University professor of criminal law.

At that Wal-Mart in Beavercreek, outside Dayton, 22-year-old John Crawford III was talking on a cellphone and picked up an air rifle on August 5.

A 911 caller reported seeing someone waving a gun and pointing it at people. Police said Crawford was shot when he didn't respond to officers' orders to drop the weapon, something the video can't prove because there's no audio.

Crawford's relatives and their attorneys say he was "shot on sight" with no chance to respond and that the video proves the shooting was unreasonable.

A grand jury concluded it was justified. A federal investigation is pending.

Sometimes a video instantly offers incriminating evidence. In South Carolina this month, a state trooper was fired and charged with assault after his dashboard video, with audio, showed an unarmed driver being shot in the hip."

Source here

 Source: http://www.abc.net.au/tv/bigideas/stories/2014/09/04/4081183.htm

Source: http://www.abc.net.au/tv/bigideas/stories/2014/09/04/4081183.htm

 Source: http://www.iq2oz.com/debates/we-are-becoming-enslaved-by-our-technology-/

Source: http://www.iq2oz.com/debates/we-are-becoming-enslaved-by-our-technology-/

 Source: http://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/bigideas/enslaved-by-our-technology3f/5598912

Source: http://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/bigideas/enslaved-by-our-technology3f/5598912

 Source: http://www.acola.org.au/index.php/news/70-we-are-becoming-enslaved-by-our-technology

Source: http://www.acola.org.au/index.php/news/70-we-are-becoming-enslaved-by-our-technology

Transient

"The NSW Government has announced a $4 million rollout of military-style "body cams" - lightweight, miniature video cameras clipped to uniforms, helmets or vehicles - to record evidence during incidents.

A spokeswoman for WA Police Commissioner Karl O'Callaghan said cameras were already used in WA by motorcycle patrol officers, who often worked alone, and in advance-traffic management vehicles. She said Mr O'Callaghan had considered body cameras being used more broadly by WA Police officers but hinted at a cost-benefit analysis before any final decision.

"The value of using body cams for more routine police work has to be weighed against the cost of maintaining a system for recording, storage and retrieval of thousands of gigabytes of data and the complexity of maintaining security protocols around access," she said."

Read more here

  Image - (c) Brian Carpani / flickr

Image - (c) Brian Carpani / flickr

The following document was originally published here - http://goo.gl/wi994a


CONTACT WITH LAW ENFORCEMENT

Tips on what to do during contact with a law enforcement officer while playing Ingress

Its important to consider the possibility of coming into contact with the police. After all, Ingress calls for a certain type of late night rendezvous with other players or portals. As this game is geared for the techies in our community, not everyone is aware of the game. In addition, there are people that may be aware of it, but do not know your intentions and may call a law enforcement agency to report your suspicious behavior. Below you will find some useful information to help you should you encounter an officer of the law while on your conquest to save humanity one way or another. This is not legal advice, only a suggestion. The author of this document nor the organizations & individuals that post/share this document are not responsible for your actions.

 

    If you are in your vehicle:

  • Shut off the engine if it`s running

    • This will show your intention of not running from them

  • Turn on your interior light

    • This allows them to see in your vehicle better

  • Do not move after you put your hands on the steering wheel

    • Don't reach for your DL or ID, if they want it, they will ask

 

If you are not in your vehicle:

  • Keep your hands out of your pockets

    • Don't make any sudden movements, and keep your hands down

  • Keep your distance, the officer will move as close as they feel comfortable

    • Stay still and don't back up or move around

 

    General things for both situations:

  • Explain slowly what you are doing in a light and meaningful manner

    • Don't be rude, condescending or evasive in your answers

  • Stay calm, and don't worry

    • If you are not doing anything wrong, you won't be in trouble!

  • Comply with all requests and orders

    • Don't move for your ID or anything until asked. Advise the officer of where it’s at before moving to grab it

  • If you are carrying a firearm, declare it immediately in a polite manner!

    • Also advise the officer if you have a valid CCW Permit on you

 

Keep in mind, whoever called you into the police may have embellished your actions to hasten their response time. With that knowledge, it’s expected that the officers responding will have no idea about what is really going on. All they are told is someone is where they normally shouldn’t be, and doing something that they are not supposed to be doing. When the officer arrives, s/he will ask a lot of questions to get the story of what is actually taking place - so be patient and answer the questions without getting irritated and upset. Staying calm and not making any sudden movements will keep the tension down between both you and the officers, and prevent anything bad from happening.

 

It’s also a good idea to familiarize yourself with any local laws and ordinances. Keep in mind, most city and state parks close at dusk - regardless if there is a gate blocking entrance to the parking lot. If someone asks you to leave, comply with the request. If they are an agent of the property you are on, they have the final word. The same rule applies for firearms - they ask you to leave or put it away, you must comply!

Here are some local laws and ordinances to familiarize yourself with. This is only a listing to find information and should not be construed as legal advice - always consult your attorney (this applies to the entire document as well).

 

Title 13 of the Arizona Revised Statutes is the section for the criminal code. The big laws to remember while playing Ingress relate to trespassing and criminal damage (if you damage anything):

 

 


The original founding article was produced and accessible from Brian Wassom's website:

"...I recently stumbled across this post from a Kansas law enforcement lobbyist, originally posted in January 2014. It purports to describe “a number” of 911 calls in Park City about “suspicious persons” who turned out to be playing the augmented reality game Ingress. The article also cites one of my blog posts as an example of what “can go wrong” when Ingress players cross paths with police, and suggests that readers Google the phrase “ingress police calls” to find more. - See more at: http://www.wassom.com/ingress-ar-game-impacting-kansas-law-enforcement.html#sthash.4rB2Ub7R.dpuf

Killer Robots

"...Over the past decade, the expanded use of unmanned armed vehicles has dramatically changed warfare, bringing new humanitarian and legal challenges. Now rapid advances in technology are resulting in efforts to develop fully autonomous weapons. These robotic weapons would be able to choose and fire on targets on their own, without any human intervention. This capability would pose a fundamental challenge to the protection of civilians and to compliance with international human rights and humanitarian law."

Read more


"...Interview with Mitch Jackson - lots more on Mitch Jackson here - https://plus.google.com/u/0/+MitchJackson/about "


"...I wouldn't be surprised if somewhere down the line this [ Google Glass ] will be the norm....or whatever the mobile technology is."  - 2 April 2014 9:24AM AEST


Mitch Jackson provides an account of how he perceives Google Glass playing out across the legal profession in his state and perhaps across the United States more broadly. Mitch also provides feedback on a range of far ranging questions that included:

1. Mitch, which part of the US do you call home?
2. In your email signature you identify as a trial lawyer with 28 years experience. How is it then that you have identified as a #glassexplorer  and what does that do for your credibility as a Lawyer?
3. There have been some very public events of late that expose both the good and the bad sides of #glass  - what do you consider is the difference?
4. Have you or do you envisage in the the near future dealing with cases that involve #glass  legally in any way?
5. Where dont you wear #glass  ?
6. What has your Family reaction been to #glass  ? Rotary ? your sports associations?
7. When you say your involved with social media and #googleglass   in your G+ profile do you see these as separate entities or mutually complementary?
8. #glass  is at this point still a relatively unknown phenomena here in Australasia. What do you consider will be the impact of #glass  more broadly on the professional communities across Australia?
9. Given that society has changed significantly since the inception of the Internet do you have any ideas on what likely changes might happen with the functions and form of #googleglass  in the next iterations before it's public release?
10. What is the likely shifts in law and governance that we are going to have to tackle as a Society and internationally or even perhaps across all of humanity as a result of #glass  ?


Tit for tat. Citizens turn camera on police; so police respond by turning cameras on society. Who wins? What next? Memory implants? 

Video can lie because context can be missing- let us not fool ourselves... discussion on wearables as applied to a multitude of applications is the topic of the next IEEE Technology and Society Magazine (June 2014) after this program in 2013. Check out http://sites.ieee.org/istas-2013

Interested readers might also like to look at this pioneering summary from the Point of View Technologies in Law Enforcement Workshop (2012) http://works.bepress.com/kmichael/249/ in addition to the Human Rights and Policing Conference (2013) http://www.ceps.edu.au/events/2013-ceps-human-rights-and-policing-conference/technology-and-forensic-science which featured the work of Mick Keelty et al. 

 Source: http://www.defencesystemsaustralia.com.au/ProductsandServices/RevealRS3.aspx

Source: http://www.defencesystemsaustralia.com.au/ProductsandServices/RevealRS3.aspx

New story here.

"Some officers have already paid for their own miniature cameras, raising concerns about the storage of data on personal computers.

The Keelty Review into the QPS last year flagged privacy issues around the storage of police recordings on home computers. It recommended investigating a solution to storing “big data”.

The camera revelation came after The Courier-Mail won a more than 12-month Right to Information battle to overturn a police decision to keep secret the results of a trial of cameras on Tasers.

It was released after the Information Commissioner overturned the QPS’s decision.

The 2011 review found Taser Cams were operationally ineffective, but recommended investigating body-worn cameras to record all use-of-force incidents after an extension of the trial found the body cameras superior in all areas.

The release of the report comes as the police Ethical Standards Command prepares to interview a Logan woman as part of an investigation into how she lost her eye after being Tasered in February.

Police are unable to rely on footage of the incident as Queensland’s 1000-plus Tasers do not have cameras and police are not issued body-worn video cameras.

An analysis of police use-of-force reports obtained under RTI for 2012 found that of the 63 people stunned by Tasers that year, only five were caught on CCTV.

Queensland Police Union president Ian Leavers said the review findings supported his repeated calls for the QPS to issue body-worn cameras.

“Body-worn cameras are the modern equivalent of the police notebook and should be compulsory equipment for all police,” Mr Leavers said."

"...I definitely see a revolution in how some people will work..."

Here are the ten core questions I asked of Mark today:

1. Mark, I have you down in my G+ circles as a colleague. I note you have 290 followers. How have you managed to keep such a quiet profile amidst your incredible achievements?
2. You claim not to be a #glassexplorer  or at least not part of that online community. What do you call your developments then with #glass  or at least with the wider sub-sets of alternative providers?
3. I met with you at ISMAR13 in Adelaide, South Australia. Shortly after that event another occurred in the same university with Professor Andrew Goldsmith, Cybercrimes. What do you see as the nexus between augmented reality (AR) and that of unmanned aerial systems? (UAS)
4. Christchurch is a lovely part of the world. Given you've just returned from Israel what do you consider to be the hotbeds of technology development in the world at present?
5. What does the term privacy mean to you? 
6. In a world of big data, open data and the ripples still subsiding from the NSA and Snowden case what do you see as the greatest challenge for those who choose to route their quantified selves through servers in other countries (the cloud)? Is wearable technology responsible in some way for a shift in humanity?
7. The #glassroom  - tell us who takes your C22: The Glass Class: Designing Wearable Interfaces and why ?
8. I take it your familiar with +Thad Starner - it appears 'empathetic' appears in both of your current discourses - can you tell us more about what you mean by using augmented reality to create empathetic experiences?
9. Is artificial intelligence (AI) set to leapfrog wearables as the revolution or do we have to wait and see  #glass  sweep across Australasia first?
10. Will #glass  cause revolt, upturn apple-carts, challenge stereotypes, ubiquitously slip amongst the tools of the K-2 educator? What the key challenges that we face as humanity with #glass or is this set to be a US based phenomena only?

 Prescott flies drone onto oncoming train on the Sydney Harbour Bridge on October 3, 2013.

Prescott flies drone onto oncoming train on the Sydney Harbour Bridge on October 3, 2013.

Watch more here in this Brisbane Times news clipping.


Transient

"People are becoming more cautious about privacy in hyperspace – this is mostly due to the recent NSA spy program disclosures. Given high profile stories such as WikiLeaks and the recent NSA surveillance reports, individual citizens are becoming increasingly more wary of cyber-related privacy concerns."
Reasons for quitting Facebook were mainly privacy concerns (48.3%), followed by a general dissatisfaction (13.5%), negative aspects of online friends (12.6%) and the feeling of becoming addicted (6.0%)"

Read more - http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-2423713/Facebook-users-committing-virtual-identity-suicide-quitting-site-droves-privacy-addiction-fears.html

Source: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/art...

Mobile devices and wearable technology are redefining the phrase "personal computer" - no longer conjuring up thoughts of desktop or even laptop devices, but rather devices smaller - and more powerful - than many ever dreamed possible. The mobile phone in your hand - the one that has more computing performance than a 1979 Cray Supercomputer - is quickly being transformed into a mesh of wearable devices, allowing you remain connected 24x7 and throw off more private data than ever.

With the rise of mobile and wearable tech comes the ability for services providers, their partners and, well, just about anybody with a few dollars, to track where you are, what you are doing, who you are doing it with, where you've been and how quickly you're likely to be doing it again at your next "habitual" destination. Oh, and the likely route you are going to take.

Issues abound: what really differentiates mobile devices from wearable tech, and how are their privacy issues different? Why are we being pushed into an always-on/always-tracked society, and what is this data likely to reveal about ourselves over time?

MG Michael and I have long written about the links between the misuse of social media and youth suicide. We hope that increasingly academics take up the call for research into this very important domain. The digital era we live in has incredible benefits but we cannot ignore the downsides.

 Courtesy: Queensland Police Service

Courtesy: Queensland Police Service

For example: M.G. Michael and Katina Michael. "The Fall-Out from Emerging Technologies: on Matters of Surveillance, Social Networks and Suicide" IEEE Technology and Society Magazine 30.3 (2011): 15-18. Available at: http://works.bepress.com/kmichael/236  

MG has a professional counsellors qualification with a major in abuse and abuse counselling from the Australian Institute of Professional Counsellors while I have spoken to enough high school counsellors and mothers to understand the silent epidemic that has and continues to impact our youth. Time and time again, I hear of the major problems surrounding the misuse of Facebook and other social media applications by 13+ years old (especially by young girls).

I know, I know... some of you out there think the police have the wrong strategy in building awareness, that schools go over the top with their policies of what their students can and cannot do online, but while the rhetoric surrounding "let kids explore and they will learn by trial and error" sounds great, some of them just won't make it...  

We aren't about to go back into an era of no social media, but what can we do as a society to make sure teenagers and children do not become just another "cost of doing business"... these are real lives we are talking about, not just some piece of hardware that is carrying a virus that you can throw away and replace with a brand new model... 

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