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“…Scientists in China are conducting a world-first clinical trial of deep brain stimulation (DBS) on drug addicts, in the hope that the technology will extinguish addiction, quite literally, with the flip of a switch.” - Read more at https://mobile.abc.net.au/news/2019-05-08/china-trials-brain-implants-to-treat-drug-addiction/11090936?pfmredir=sm

Groups of citizens wielding cameras take to the streets of New York to document the systemic police brutality and racism facing the public. The cops hate it and so they push back hard.

This is how police accountability plays out in the real world. Take heed Australia:

Source: http://copwatchnyc.org/

Axon creates connected technologies for truth in public safety.

"....TASER and Microsoft have formed a unique partnership that brings together two powerful technology platforms to meet the unique needs of law enforcement today. With unmatched technology innovation and industry-leading security, the partnership is enabling transformation in public safety practices while also promoting greater transparency and trust between law enforcement and private citizens."

Read more

This man knows a lot about what is happening in this area - https://ccj.asu.edu/content/michael-white

Guess what's behind that wall?

More here

The use of technology that allows the police to "see" inside the homes of suspects has raised privacy questions.
At least 50 US police forces are believed to be equipped with radars that can send signals through walls.
The use of the radar device, known as Range-R, was made public in a Denver court late last year.
It was used by police entering a house to arrest a man who had violated the terms of his parole.
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In 2001, the Supreme Court ruled that police cannot use thermal cameras without a warrant, specifically noting that the rule would also apply to radar-based systems that were then being developed.
"The idea that government can send signals through the wall of your house to figure out what's inside is problematic," Christopher Soghoian, principal technologist for the American Civil Liberties Union told USA Today.
"Technologies that allow the police to look inside of a home are among the intrusive tools that police have."
Transient

"The father of a man fatally shot by police at an Ohio Wal-Mart says a phone call in which he heard his son's dying breaths keeps replaying in his head.

John Crawford III, was shot August 5, in a Wal-Mart. A 911 caller told police that Crawford III was waving a weapon that turned out to be an air rifle.

Officers have said Crawford III was shot when he didn't respond to orders to put the gun down.

His father, John Crawford Jr, talked about the last day of son's life to The Cincinnati Enquirer.

The Crawford family and their attorney have said that a section of store surveillance video they saw shows Crawford III holding the air rifle and talking on his mobile phone.

The family has requested public release of the store video. But Ohio Attorney General Mike DeWine has refused to release it while the investigation is continuing."

More here

"A man walks through Wal-Mart, holding something to his ear as he passes a gun case.

He leans toward a shelf and steps back into view, now holding a long, dark object — a gun? — as he walks past customers, who show no obvious reaction.

Eight minutes later, surveillance video from a different angle shows him farther away.

Suddenly he drops the object and crumples to the floor. Two more people come into view, walking toward him with firearms drawn.

Was it a justified fatal shooting by police or an unreasonable use of force? Does the soundless video offer enough information to answer that question?

In the Wal-Mart case and others, cameras meant to help catch bad guys or document police actions are drawing attention for capturing officers using force.

The public circulation of those images increases transparency, but it also adds the risk of viewers rushing to judgment based on only part of the story.

"You might see a video and think that because you're seeing an actual sort of account of what happened, you know the whole story.

And it's very rare that a video is actually going to be able to tell the whole story," said Ric Simmons, an Ohio State University professor of criminal law.

At that Wal-Mart in Beavercreek, outside Dayton, 22-year-old John Crawford III was talking on a cellphone and picked up an air rifle on August 5.

A 911 caller reported seeing someone waving a gun and pointing it at people. Police said Crawford was shot when he didn't respond to officers' orders to drop the weapon, something the video can't prove because there's no audio.

Crawford's relatives and their attorneys say he was "shot on sight" with no chance to respond and that the video proves the shooting was unreasonable.

A grand jury concluded it was justified. A federal investigation is pending.

Sometimes a video instantly offers incriminating evidence. In South Carolina this month, a state trooper was fired and charged with assault after his dashboard video, with audio, showed an unarmed driver being shot in the hip."

Source here

Source: http://www.abc.net.au/tv/bigideas/stories/2014/09/04/4081183.htm

Source: http://www.abc.net.au/tv/bigideas/stories/2014/09/04/4081183.htm

Source: http://www.iq2oz.com/debates/we-are-becoming-enslaved-by-our-technology-/

Source: http://www.iq2oz.com/debates/we-are-becoming-enslaved-by-our-technology-/

Source: http://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/bigideas/enslaved-by-our-technology3f/5598912

Source: http://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/bigideas/enslaved-by-our-technology3f/5598912

Source: http://www.acola.org.au/index.php/news/70-we-are-becoming-enslaved-by-our-technology

Source: http://www.acola.org.au/index.php/news/70-we-are-becoming-enslaved-by-our-technology

Transient

"The NSW Government has announced a $4 million rollout of military-style "body cams" - lightweight, miniature video cameras clipped to uniforms, helmets or vehicles - to record evidence during incidents.

A spokeswoman for WA Police Commissioner Karl O'Callaghan said cameras were already used in WA by motorcycle patrol officers, who often worked alone, and in advance-traffic management vehicles. She said Mr O'Callaghan had considered body cameras being used more broadly by WA Police officers but hinted at a cost-benefit analysis before any final decision.

"The value of using body cams for more routine police work has to be weighed against the cost of maintaining a system for recording, storage and retrieval of thousands of gigabytes of data and the complexity of maintaining security protocols around access," she said."

Read more here

Image - (c) Brian Carpani / flickr

Image - (c) Brian Carpani / flickr

The following document was originally published here - http://goo.gl/wi994a


CONTACT WITH LAW ENFORCEMENT

Tips on what to do during contact with a law enforcement officer while playing Ingress

Its important to consider the possibility of coming into contact with the police. After all, Ingress calls for a certain type of late night rendezvous with other players or portals. As this game is geared for the techies in our community, not everyone is aware of the game. In addition, there are people that may be aware of it, but do not know your intentions and may call a law enforcement agency to report your suspicious behavior. Below you will find some useful information to help you should you encounter an officer of the law while on your conquest to save humanity one way or another. This is not legal advice, only a suggestion. The author of this document nor the organizations & individuals that post/share this document are not responsible for your actions.

 

    If you are in your vehicle:

  • Shut off the engine if it`s running

    • This will show your intention of not running from them

  • Turn on your interior light

    • This allows them to see in your vehicle better

  • Do not move after you put your hands on the steering wheel

    • Don't reach for your DL or ID, if they want it, they will ask

 

If you are not in your vehicle:

  • Keep your hands out of your pockets

    • Don't make any sudden movements, and keep your hands down

  • Keep your distance, the officer will move as close as they feel comfortable

    • Stay still and don't back up or move around

 

    General things for both situations:

  • Explain slowly what you are doing in a light and meaningful manner

    • Don't be rude, condescending or evasive in your answers

  • Stay calm, and don't worry

    • If you are not doing anything wrong, you won't be in trouble!

  • Comply with all requests and orders

    • Don't move for your ID or anything until asked. Advise the officer of where it’s at before moving to grab it

  • If you are carrying a firearm, declare it immediately in a polite manner!

    • Also advise the officer if you have a valid CCW Permit on you

 

Keep in mind, whoever called you into the police may have embellished your actions to hasten their response time. With that knowledge, it’s expected that the officers responding will have no idea about what is really going on. All they are told is someone is where they normally shouldn’t be, and doing something that they are not supposed to be doing. When the officer arrives, s/he will ask a lot of questions to get the story of what is actually taking place - so be patient and answer the questions without getting irritated and upset. Staying calm and not making any sudden movements will keep the tension down between both you and the officers, and prevent anything bad from happening.

 

It’s also a good idea to familiarize yourself with any local laws and ordinances. Keep in mind, most city and state parks close at dusk - regardless if there is a gate blocking entrance to the parking lot. If someone asks you to leave, comply with the request. If they are an agent of the property you are on, they have the final word. The same rule applies for firearms - they ask you to leave or put it away, you must comply!

Here are some local laws and ordinances to familiarize yourself with. This is only a listing to find information and should not be construed as legal advice - always consult your attorney (this applies to the entire document as well).

 

Title 13 of the Arizona Revised Statutes is the section for the criminal code. The big laws to remember while playing Ingress relate to trespassing and criminal damage (if you damage anything):

 

 


The original founding article was produced and accessible from Brian Wassom's website:

"...I recently stumbled across this post from a Kansas law enforcement lobbyist, originally posted in January 2014. It purports to describe “a number” of 911 calls in Park City about “suspicious persons” who turned out to be playing the augmented reality game Ingress. The article also cites one of my blog posts as an example of what “can go wrong” when Ingress players cross paths with police, and suggests that readers Google the phrase “ingress police calls” to find more. - See more at: http://www.wassom.com/ingress-ar-game-impacting-kansas-law-enforcement.html#sthash.4rB2Ub7R.dpuf