Vint Cerf, the living legend largely responsible for the development of the Internet protocol suite, has some concerns about history. In his current column for the Communications of the ACM, Cerf worries about the decreasing longevity of our media, and, thus, about our ability as a civilization to self-document—to have a historical record that one day far in the future might be remarked upon and learned from. Magnetic films do not quite have the staying power as clay tablets.

At stake, according to Cerf, is “the possibility that the centuries well before ours will be better known than ours will be unless we are persistent about preserving digital content. The earlier media seem to have a kind of timeless longevity while modern media from the 1800s forward seem to have shrinking lifetimes. Just as the monks and Muslims of the Middle Ages preserved content by copying into new media, won’t we need to do the same for our modern content?”

As media becomes more ephemeral across technological generations, the more it depends on the technological generation that comes next.

Also, depends on the mindset of the generation that comes next too... What if we don't even want to remember?

Source: http://motherboard.vice.com/read/vint-cerf...
 Image: OBJ

Image: OBJ

"...What do you get when you mix Google Glass and EEG? That’s the question that the people at Ottawa-based Personal Neuro are on their way to answering. Given the buzz around how Google Glass can be used in healthcare, and our longstanding interest in brain-computer interface, we took the opportunity to speak with Personal Neuro’s CEO, Steve Denison, about his company and what they’re building."

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"...."The question is, 'Will Google Glass become mainstream and popular?' I guess I am worried that we have already made that decision. It has already been precluded by the question of whether we will allow a few large private technology companies like Google to determine by decree how we behave in contemporary society. And the answer seems to be yes."


"...Short Interview with Cathie Reid - #glassexplorer - More about Cathie - https://plus.google.com/u/0/117806724842643433035/about "

I've invited Cathie to come to Canberra, Australia and connect with the public at the INSPIRE Centre, University of Canberra as part of the 2014 #glassmeetups . These blended face-to-face and online events provide an opportunity for discussions as to what other areas of the medical, healthcare, aged care industries might have in development or even in conceptual proof of concept such as the depiction below.

"...I definitely see a revolution in how some people will work..."

Here are the ten core questions I asked of Mark today:

1. Mark, I have you down in my G+ circles as a colleague. I note you have 290 followers. How have you managed to keep such a quiet profile amidst your incredible achievements?
2. You claim not to be a #glassexplorer  or at least not part of that online community. What do you call your developments then with #glass  or at least with the wider sub-sets of alternative providers?
3. I met with you at ISMAR13 in Adelaide, South Australia. Shortly after that event another occurred in the same university with Professor Andrew Goldsmith, Cybercrimes. What do you see as the nexus between augmented reality (AR) and that of unmanned aerial systems? (UAS)
4. Christchurch is a lovely part of the world. Given you've just returned from Israel what do you consider to be the hotbeds of technology development in the world at present?
5. What does the term privacy mean to you? 
6. In a world of big data, open data and the ripples still subsiding from the NSA and Snowden case what do you see as the greatest challenge for those who choose to route their quantified selves through servers in other countries (the cloud)? Is wearable technology responsible in some way for a shift in humanity?
7. The #glassroom  - tell us who takes your C22: The Glass Class: Designing Wearable Interfaces and why ?
8. I take it your familiar with +Thad Starner - it appears 'empathetic' appears in both of your current discourses - can you tell us more about what you mean by using augmented reality to create empathetic experiences?
9. Is artificial intelligence (AI) set to leapfrog wearables as the revolution or do we have to wait and see  #glass  sweep across Australasia first?
10. Will #glass  cause revolt, upturn apple-carts, challenge stereotypes, ubiquitously slip amongst the tools of the K-2 educator? What the key challenges that we face as humanity with #glass or is this set to be a US based phenomena only?

For the full article visit here

Posted
AuthorKatina Michael

 

Thought experiment.

Taking everything you know about the world of computers, the history of screen experience and the trajectory of emerging technologies—say with Google Glass, for example—combined with this culture’s love affair with instant gratification, recording, surveillance, narcissism, and control; what could one be left looking at?

The Entire History of You explores some of these ideas in a world where most people have an implant behind their ear called a ‘grain’ which records everything they do, see and hear. Memories can be played back either in front of the person’s eyes or on a screen—a process known as a ‘re-do.’

Nothing is off limits. Everything is recorded, archived, and scrutinised.

Scrutiny comes to social events too. ‘Re-dos’ are done with friends and family, analogous to the current culture of social media ‘sharing’ and the solipsistic sense of self lived vicariously through screens.

In this world—and of our own—what are the myriad personal, interpersonal and social implications? What do the profound repercussions for relationships and even individual existential experience look like?

The Entire History of You is part of a series of films called Black Mirror which explore different aspects of “the way we live now—and the way we might be living in 10 minutes’ time if we're clumsy.”

More to come...

This morning I listened to the Dr Katherine Albrecht Show (see archive of 27 February 2014). Katherine was discussing the impact of video gaming on children. I watched this clip as a result of the program she aired.

Yesterday, Dr Albrecht appeared on George Noury's Coast to Coast program (see technology update here) and discussed the 'I want my iPad' phenomenon in toddlers. Here is another video she pointed to:

And another... She maintained that she would generally NOT wish for listeners to view these kinds of clips online but in this instance, it was the only way to raise awareness to an epidemic occurring in our society.

This phenomenon is a known phenomenon. See more. So what are we doing about it? Gathering the evidence and putting our kids online so that our Youtube hits increase ten-thousand fold?

I feel so sick in linking these videos of these kids up online in the uberveillance.com environment. But I am calling people out there to wake up to the what is occurring in most of our households. 

What is the answer? 

Better parenting?

Better friends and extended support groups?

Zero tolerance on screen time for toddlers?

Better education?

Schools saying 'no' to technology in the classroom?

Are we adding fuel to the fire?

 

What is blatantly obvious to me is that we need more research into SOLUTIONS. We can't have kids crying like this and profusely suffering anguish, and we cannot have parents surviving this kind of daily misery... and most of all we need to feedback these problems to developers... we cannot point the finger at Apple or Google alone... we need to point the finger at ourselves... society... yes 'we' perpetuate the problem. We can plead ignorance but we all know someone going through this- a child, a grandchild, a niece or nephew, a friend or a neighbour... in fact, we might be even going through it ourselves!

 

Where have we gone wrong?

Beyond that obvious point?

Why are the parents of these poor children putting their kids up online for everyone to comment on? Are they deep down seeking help? Do they want their prayers answered? Do they want to make their kids well?

We cannot claim ALL of these children appearing in thousands of uploads (just search online) are due to autism or some other mental illness or developmental problems! And if we claim that, are computers somehow contributing to these developmental issues?

The other thing that becomes apparent to me is the use of the mobile phone video camera as a weapon. Have we become so heartless, that we begin now to film these traumatic events and post them online for others to comment on. You were right on the mark Dr Albrecht. This is evil. Instead of going over and gently comforting our kids to return to their senses, we take out the camera to record the reality-tv... and so our children are now a part of a global theatre!

In previous posts, I have discussed the importance of NOT capturing these moments so we can allow our children to grow and develop, and not be held accountable for things they did as children. MG Michael and I have discussed the limits of watching. With Christine Perakslis we have also written an extensive book chapter on veillance (in press)! 

Can you imagine being one of the kids in this video? How would that make you feel 5 years on, 10 years on, 20 years on, or when you first discovered it was online for all to see on Youtube? Would you be typecast for life?

 

Everyone, we have to wake up! I am not being alarmist... if your heart doesn't feel sad over these videos then I personally don't know what to say...

And then we are contemplating taking Glass into the classroom? Right-o! Don't you think these tantrums don't happen at school? Will our children become "objects" not just "subjects" in the classroom? Let us tread VERY carefully. We can't use our kids as experiments. We need to think ethics.

And it is not just children that react this way... no... no... adults too, have this reaction but just convey it in a different way. See my article on high-tech lust!

We need to take the negative social implications of computers more seriously. Yes, some guys out there claim that computers can help kids... all my fellow collaborators and I are claiming is that the opposite is also true. Let's not be so narrowsighted. This is our future we are talking about!

Indie-rock band Yeah Yeah Yeahs started a strike against the usage of smartphones/cameras at their concerts. 

"Many tweeted that they wished all concert venues would post rules against smartphone use at shows." 


"And there's the truth: camera-phone footage ruins not just the moment, but the memory of the moment – for you have no memory of it, only that bad quality footage."

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Posted
Authoralexanderhayes

Thanks KMA for the link. Does anyone know who created this image? A member of Gizmodo loaded it up here

Thanks Jore. This work belongs to: http://eranfolio.deviantart.com/art/Reality-1440x900-78861805 Artist is: EranFolio (aka Eran Fowler a Canadian artist) and title of work is "Reality".

 

 

 

I lost my mother, Susan (Young) Kropa to early-onset Alzheimer's disease in 2011. My mom was a painter, illustrator, author and elementary school art teacher for over 25 years. When she first developed Alzheimer's disease around age 60 the progression was slow and gradual. In the late spring of 2011, her symptoms grew worse rapidly and it soon became apparent she would need around the clock professional care. These photographs are from what turned out to be the last time I saw her.

autographer.jpg

"...We’ve created a beautiful smartphone app and desktop software to make storing, sharing, and curating Autography fast and simple wherever you are. Check out our ecographic to learn how the complete experience works together"

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This is a poem I delivered at the final session of the final day of the IEEE ISTAS13 conference. The poem is titled Veillance.me and it was meant to be delivered on the first morning of the conference in order to set a backdrop and tone for the program at large. Instead it became the closing summary of the event on the 29th June 2013.

The poem was written on the 24th of June on a flight that was delayed from Ottawa to Washington Dulles Airport. A culmination of 9 months of planning and preparation that required corresponding with over 150 authors and delegates of the conference in 15 countries.

My thanks to all those who shared their ideas, their research, and their uncertainty for the times ahead. ISTAS13 had something for everyone- it was a complete success- highlighting both positive and negative implications of emerging technologies such as wearable computing.

One thing for certain, we all left with the knowledge that we have a lot of work to do to contribute our ideas in the coming decade.