medical body area network (MBAN)
Posted by: Margaret Rouse
An MBAN (pronounced M-ban) is a medical body area network (BAN) composed of low-power wearable or implanted wireless medical devices. 
Wearable devices are typically low-cost, disposable sensors that stick to the body and free the patient from being being physically tethered to monitoring devices. Embedded devices may be sensors that are swallowed for short-term monitoring or placed in the body during surgery to monitor physical parameters during and after the healing process.
The sensors transmit patient data wirelessly to a control device located either on the patient’s body or in close proximity to it. The control device, which functions as a message broker, forwards data from the sensors to a workstation in real time over a wireless local area network (WLAN).  
"Or even less appealing, the state of this patient could be so severe, that they require full time skilled nursing care in the confines of a nursing home or assisted living facility.
“you could take a device and instead of the patient wearing it on his or her wrist or clothes, a physician implants that device in the chest”
Imagine much like a FitBit, you could take a device and instead of the patient wearing it on his or her wrist or clothes, a physician implants that device in the chest. That device then has wires that run underneath the skin to various nerves in the body and to the deep parts of the brain. That device can then send specific amounts of electricity to the nervous system at various times to disrupt the diseased pathway and restore the patient to normal health. "

Source: https://www.europeanpharmaceuticalreview.com/news/47692/imot-healthcare/

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 CBS2 has learned that prescription medications as we know them may soon be a thing in the past.

As CBS2’s Kristine Johnson reported, they could be replaced with tiny, implantable microchips that can treat, and potentially cure, dozens of chronic diseases with “high-tech healing.”

“The chip will cure some diseases, and the chip will prevent others,” said Dr. Kevin Tracey of the Feinstein Institute for Medical Research on Long Island.

The chip is implanted in the body, where it sends little electrical currents telling the nervous system to tell the body to heal itself.

“The diseases that can be treated by this approach is a lengthy list — cancer, diabetes, heart disease, stroke, Alzheimer’s,” Tracey said.

The chip is Tracey’s brainchild. He is a neurosurgeon with the institute, and his efforts have launched a new field in healthcare–known as bioelectronics.

“The promise of bioelectronic medicine  is to restore the activity of nerves whose function, for whatever reason — disease or aging — are not functioning properly,” he said.

Tracey said the technology is extremely precise, and there are no side effects. He compares it to how a pacemaker controls the nerves of the heart, except these new devices  will control the nerves of the immune system.

“Potentially nerves to tumors, to cancer cells; nerves to the bowel and bladder,” Tracey said.

Clinical trials for multiple chips are currently underway, and positive results have already been reported in treating conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis and even appetite control.

“I figured, what did I have to lose?” said Virginia Valles, who participated in a clinical trial.

Virginia Valles was one of the first to test a bioelectronic device  for weight loss. Since starting the trial four years ago, she has lost nearly 100 pounds.

“You get this feeling of fullness. It’s like you just ate a nice, big meal,” said Dr. Ken Fujikoa, a weight-loss researcher at the Scripps Research Institute in San Diego.

Instead of disappearing, drug makers such as Glaxo Smith Kline are looking ahead and funding research in this next frontier.

“Every single disease that we have looked at, we have found we could make medicines bioelectronically,” said Dr. Moncef Slaoui of Glaxo Smith Kline.

Bioelectronic devices are controlled by a smartphone or tablet that is programmed and monitored by the patient’s doctor.

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The wearable, non-irritating sensor tattoo can detect glucose in the fluid just under the skin.  It is based on integrating glucose extraction and electrochemical biosensing.  Testing on seven volunteers showed  that it was able to accurately determine glucose levels. The sensor response correlated with that of a commercial glucose monitor.



The wireless pacemaker is just 3mm long

The wireless pacemaker is just 3mm long

"US researchers have built a wirelessly powered pacemaker the size of a grain of rice and implanted it in a rabbit.

They were able to hold a metal plate a few centimetres above the rabbit's chest and use it to regulate the animal's heartbeat.

If such medical implants could be made to work in humans, it could lead to smaller devices that are safer to fit."

Read more here

Source of article in this academic paper here

Image: OBJ

Image: OBJ

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Image: Tinke

"...The use of reflective technology raised a critical challenge where natural light enters through a person's fingernail and is detected by the light detector. In order to ensure an accurate measurement is made, Tinké is packed with a comprehensive set of signal processing algorithms designed to treat the signals detected and filter all background signals.* "

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"...Short Interview with Cathie Reid - #glassexplorer - More about Cathie - https://plus.google.com/u/0/117806724842643433035/about "

I've invited Cathie to come to Canberra, Australia and connect with the public at the INSPIRE Centre, University of Canberra as part of the 2014 #glassmeetups . These blended face-to-face and online events provide an opportunity for discussions as to what other areas of the medical, healthcare, aged care industries might have in development or even in conceptual proof of concept such as the depiction below.

"During the surgery, the technology allowed Parekh to view X-Rays and MRI data while working on the patient simultaneously. Dr. Ashish Sharma, head of the American team of doctors present at the conference, also said Google Glass allows a doctor to communicate with a patient's family or friends during the procedure."

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