Groups of citizens wielding cameras take to the streets of New York to document the systemic police brutality and racism facing the public. The cops hate it and so they push back hard.

This is how police accountability plays out in the real world. Take heed Australia:

Source: http://copwatchnyc.org/

Axon creates connected technologies for truth in public safety.

"....TASER and Microsoft have formed a unique partnership that brings together two powerful technology platforms to meet the unique needs of law enforcement today. With unmatched technology innovation and industry-leading security, the partnership is enabling transformation in public safety practices while also promoting greater transparency and trust between law enforcement and private citizens."

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This man knows a lot about what is happening in this area - https://ccj.asu.edu/content/michael-white

Guess what's behind that wall?

More here

The use of technology that allows the police to "see" inside the homes of suspects has raised privacy questions.
At least 50 US police forces are believed to be equipped with radars that can send signals through walls.
The use of the radar device, known as Range-R, was made public in a Denver court late last year.
It was used by police entering a house to arrest a man who had violated the terms of his parole.
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In 2001, the Supreme Court ruled that police cannot use thermal cameras without a warrant, specifically noting that the rule would also apply to radar-based systems that were then being developed.
"The idea that government can send signals through the wall of your house to figure out what's inside is problematic," Christopher Soghoian, principal technologist for the American Civil Liberties Union told USA Today.
"Technologies that allow the police to look inside of a home are among the intrusive tools that police have."

"A Canadian law firm will use data from a Fitbit fitness tracker for the first time in court as an objective measure of activity.

The data will be provided by the plaintiff in a personal injury lawsuit in an effort to show life-affecting reduced activity post injury. But the case has implications for fitness trackers and smartwatches, including Motorola’s Moto 360 and Apple’s upcoming Apple Watch that can track movement.

The information for the case will be willingly provided by the plaintiff and processed by data company Vivametrica, which collects data from wearables and compares it with the activity and health of the general population. The plaintiff’s lawyers will use the data in an attempt to prove the accident’s detrimental affects.

“Till now we’ve always had to rely on clinical interpretation,” Simon Muller of McLeod Law firm in Calgary told Forbes. “Now we’re looking at longer periods of time though the course of a day, and we have hard data."

‘Only a matter of time before data from wearables is commonplace in litigation’

Beyond simple activity, fitness trackers are capable of measuring sleep and other biological data. In 2015 they are set to become more sophisticated with devices capable of measuring heart rate and detailed information about sleep patterns going on sale. Smart clothing with advanced sensors is also expected to take off by 2016, according to data from Gartner, providing another avenue for data collection.

“Wearables have the ability, among other things, to track an individual’s heart rate, workout regimens, as well as take photos and videos, and run searches on the web,” said Shakoori. “Additionally, most wearables mine geolocation data, such as running routes or the location where a photo was taken.”

The privacy of data from wearable devices has already been identified by regulators as an issue, including the US Federal Trade Commission. However, where data is stored about an individual, traditionally in the cloud as well as locally in dedicated smartphone apps, poses questions around access by law enforcement or courts and how rigorously companies defend individual’s data privacy rights."

Read more here

This is what it might be like living in an uberveillance society.

 New York Times, 2004

New York Times, 2004

 Image:  IT News

Image: IT News

“We are going to have a lot of fun around the information management aspects of body worn video – let alone the more prosaic problem of how am I going to get this stuff from the field to a central repository with as few moving parts as possible."

Read more: http://www.itnews.com.au/News/387109,nsw-police-cio-prepares-for-copper-cam-data-deluge.aspx#ixzz33S4pamm6

  Image - (c) Brian Carpani / flickr

Image - (c) Brian Carpani / flickr

The following document was originally published here - http://goo.gl/wi994a


CONTACT WITH LAW ENFORCEMENT

Tips on what to do during contact with a law enforcement officer while playing Ingress

Its important to consider the possibility of coming into contact with the police. After all, Ingress calls for a certain type of late night rendezvous with other players or portals. As this game is geared for the techies in our community, not everyone is aware of the game. In addition, there are people that may be aware of it, but do not know your intentions and may call a law enforcement agency to report your suspicious behavior. Below you will find some useful information to help you should you encounter an officer of the law while on your conquest to save humanity one way or another. This is not legal advice, only a suggestion. The author of this document nor the organizations & individuals that post/share this document are not responsible for your actions.

 

    If you are in your vehicle:

  • Shut off the engine if it`s running

    • This will show your intention of not running from them

  • Turn on your interior light

    • This allows them to see in your vehicle better

  • Do not move after you put your hands on the steering wheel

    • Don't reach for your DL or ID, if they want it, they will ask

 

If you are not in your vehicle:

  • Keep your hands out of your pockets

    • Don't make any sudden movements, and keep your hands down

  • Keep your distance, the officer will move as close as they feel comfortable

    • Stay still and don't back up or move around

 

    General things for both situations:

  • Explain slowly what you are doing in a light and meaningful manner

    • Don't be rude, condescending or evasive in your answers

  • Stay calm, and don't worry

    • If you are not doing anything wrong, you won't be in trouble!

  • Comply with all requests and orders

    • Don't move for your ID or anything until asked. Advise the officer of where it’s at before moving to grab it

  • If you are carrying a firearm, declare it immediately in a polite manner!

    • Also advise the officer if you have a valid CCW Permit on you

 

Keep in mind, whoever called you into the police may have embellished your actions to hasten their response time. With that knowledge, it’s expected that the officers responding will have no idea about what is really going on. All they are told is someone is where they normally shouldn’t be, and doing something that they are not supposed to be doing. When the officer arrives, s/he will ask a lot of questions to get the story of what is actually taking place - so be patient and answer the questions without getting irritated and upset. Staying calm and not making any sudden movements will keep the tension down between both you and the officers, and prevent anything bad from happening.

 

It’s also a good idea to familiarize yourself with any local laws and ordinances. Keep in mind, most city and state parks close at dusk - regardless if there is a gate blocking entrance to the parking lot. If someone asks you to leave, comply with the request. If they are an agent of the property you are on, they have the final word. The same rule applies for firearms - they ask you to leave or put it away, you must comply!

Here are some local laws and ordinances to familiarize yourself with. This is only a listing to find information and should not be construed as legal advice - always consult your attorney (this applies to the entire document as well).

 

Title 13 of the Arizona Revised Statutes is the section for the criminal code. The big laws to remember while playing Ingress relate to trespassing and criminal damage (if you damage anything):

 

 


The original founding article was produced and accessible from Brian Wassom's website:

"...I recently stumbled across this post from a Kansas law enforcement lobbyist, originally posted in January 2014. It purports to describe “a number” of 911 calls in Park City about “suspicious persons” who turned out to be playing the augmented reality game Ingress. The article also cites one of my blog posts as an example of what “can go wrong” when Ingress players cross paths with police, and suggests that readers Google the phrase “ingress police calls” to find more. - See more at: http://www.wassom.com/ingress-ar-game-impacting-kansas-law-enforcement.html#sthash.4rB2Ub7R.dpuf

Killer Robots

"...Over the past decade, the expanded use of unmanned armed vehicles has dramatically changed warfare, bringing new humanitarian and legal challenges. Now rapid advances in technology are resulting in efforts to develop fully autonomous weapons. These robotic weapons would be able to choose and fire on targets on their own, without any human intervention. This capability would pose a fundamental challenge to the protection of civilians and to compliance with international human rights and humanitarian law."

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"....We use the information that your mobile phone already collects about your current location and whereabouts in order to make personalized suggestions about places to go, things to see, and stuff to do, that we think you would find interesting."

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"...Interview with Mitch Jackson - lots more on Mitch Jackson here - https://plus.google.com/u/0/+MitchJackson/about "


"...I wouldn't be surprised if somewhere down the line this [ Google Glass ] will be the norm....or whatever the mobile technology is."  - 2 April 2014 9:24AM AEST


Mitch Jackson provides an account of how he perceives Google Glass playing out across the legal profession in his state and perhaps across the United States more broadly. Mitch also provides feedback on a range of far ranging questions that included:

1. Mitch, which part of the US do you call home?
2. In your email signature you identify as a trial lawyer with 28 years experience. How is it then that you have identified as a #glassexplorer  and what does that do for your credibility as a Lawyer?
3. There have been some very public events of late that expose both the good and the bad sides of #glass  - what do you consider is the difference?
4. Have you or do you envisage in the the near future dealing with cases that involve #glass  legally in any way?
5. Where dont you wear #glass  ?
6. What has your Family reaction been to #glass  ? Rotary ? your sports associations?
7. When you say your involved with social media and #googleglass   in your G+ profile do you see these as separate entities or mutually complementary?
8. #glass  is at this point still a relatively unknown phenomena here in Australasia. What do you consider will be the impact of #glass  more broadly on the professional communities across Australia?
9. Given that society has changed significantly since the inception of the Internet do you have any ideas on what likely changes might happen with the functions and form of #googleglass  in the next iterations before it's public release?
10. What is the likely shifts in law and governance that we are going to have to tackle as a Society and internationally or even perhaps across all of humanity as a result of #glass  ?


 Prescott flies drone onto oncoming train on the Sydney Harbour Bridge on October 3, 2013.

Prescott flies drone onto oncoming train on the Sydney Harbour Bridge on October 3, 2013.

Watch more here in this Brisbane Times news clipping.

2014-03-07_13-44-06-dwg.png

"....Wearables present the opportunity to give us a lot of information about ourselves that we did not have before, including while we're behind the wheel. What if there was a way to keep track of how we're driving - not how many MPG's we're getting, but how WE are doing while we're getting from point A to point B? And what if we could see this in a way that allows us to encourage our friends to be better drivers? "

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Posted
Authoralexanderhayes
Transient

"...It’s equally easy, though, to see how tech companies and techno-utopians will justify collecting and analyzing this data. Just imagine this future scenario: You drive to meet up with friends at a bar. Your phone/smartwatch senses you arrived in a car. After a couple of hours in the location it notices erratic movements and gesticulations out of the ordinary. The conclusion: You’ve had a couple of drinks and you might be driving soon, so maybe you get a push alert with the number for cab service later on in the evening when you walk out of the door. It’s an entirely hypothetical and invasive-sounding scenario, but one that’s not far from being plausible — at least from a technological standpoint."

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Transient

 

"Yahoo! is handing over private and personal information about hundreds of its users to Australian government agents, a new transparency report has revealed.
In the first six months of 2013, Australian government agents made 704 requests for access to data relating to 799 Yahoo!! accounts or users.
The US-headquartered company granted full access in response to just 11 of those requests - handing over information such as the content of Yahoo!! emails, uploaded files and Yahoo! address, calendar and notepad entries.
The firm also handed over so-called "non-content data" in response to 305 of the requests - giving government agents access to information such as the names, locations, IP addresses, login details and billing information belonging to Yahoo! account holders.
Yahoo! rejected 242 of the requests for data and found no data in 146 of the cases.
The figures were revealed in Yahoo!'s first global transparency report released at the weekend, which outlined requests for data made by government agents in 17 countries.
US government agents made 12,444 requests for data relating to 40,322 Yahoo! accounts or users in the first six months of 2013.
German agents made 4295 requests about 5306 accounts or users.
New Zealand agents made just nine requests about nine accounts or users." 

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"And it seems that wearable technologies are one of the most discussed topics with a considerable potential impact on our approach to technologies in the next years. But, with the huge amount of personal data relating to users as well as images/sounds on the people/events around him collected by means of such devices and the possibility to very easily share them on the Internet, the impact on privacy rights of these technologies will require a careful review."