Microchipping at work: US employees get voluntarily implanted at staff 'chip party'

Updated yesterday at 10:54am

Employees of a Wisconsin technology company who received a microchip implant in their hand said they felt only a brief sting during the procedure.

Key points:

  • Employees of a Wisconsin company have been voluntarily microchiped
  • It is the first US appearance of technology that is already available in Europe
  • The microchips will allow employees to log onto the company system, open doors and buy snacks

Three Square Market, also known as 32M, said 41 of its 85 employees agreed to be voluntarily microchipped during a "chip party" at company headquarters in River Falls yesterday.

The technology will allow employees to open doors, log onto computers or buy breakroom snacks by simply waving their hand.

"We came across this and saw it being used in other societies, we said why not us?" 32M chief operating officer Patrick McMullan said.

"Why not us, bring it and provide a solution that we can use for so many different things."

PHOTO: A microchip is shown compared with a dime at Three Square Market in Wisconsin. (AP: Jeff Baenen)

Melissa Timmins, vice-president of sales at 32M, said after learning more about the technology she decided to try out the chip.

"I'm excited to see what this can do," Ms Timmins said.

"I was a little apprehensive about more of the health part of it and actually implanting something into my body.

"But from day one I was excited about what we could do with the technology itself and where it could go for our company."

Ms Timmins said she hoped to eventually use it to get into her car or go shopping.

Noelle Chesley, associate professor of sociology at the University of Wisconsin, said microchipping could give employers more power over their staff.

"Is it really voluntary when your employer is asking you if you would like to be microchipped?" Ms Chesley said.

"Will there come a day where people who prefer not to be microchipped won't get certain jobs?"

Ms Chesley said she thought implanting microchips into all people would be the wave of the future.

Company leaders said this was the first US appearance of technology already available in Europe.

Three Square Market paid for the $300 microchips.

Source: http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-08-02/microchip-workers-hold-chip-party/8765934

"...An instrument no bigger than an inhaler lodges a needle into the back of Benigeri’s arm. Woo removes his hand to reveal a white plate sitting just above the implant. Benigeri smiles.
Read more at https://www.businessinsider.com/san-francisco-biohacking-continuous-glucose-monitors-2017-1#To0MjhyLcHHBIhcD.99

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Authoralexanderhayes

"Second to the contact lenses that monitor for diabetes, Google's parent company Alphabet has filed a patent which takes their development to another level. The patent specifically covers a method for "injecting a fluid into a lens capsule of an eye, wherein a natural lens of the eye has been removed from the lens capsule." It's powered by "radio frequency energy" received by a small antenna inside. The gadget even has its own data storage. Forbes reports, it is designed to "improve vision."

Samsung is also one of the most recent companies to receive a patent for smart contact lenses. Their lenses are for "experimenting with new methods of delivering augmented reality interfaces and data."

Trying to remove an implant on your own accord equates to self-harm. Relying on third parties to remove an implant mean you are at the mercy of some one else and instantly limit your freedoms.

Future "angel" care chips are coming for humans. Digital Angel in 2003 was the first to launch such a program. Then Applied Digital Solutions for Human Wander Alerts, and  PositiveID for Health oriented solutions.

This kind of sentimentalism will be at the crux of marketing campaigns about "chipping loved ones" including the elderly and children for CARE applications.

Read more: http://www.wbul.com/onair/from-the-web-56067/dog-finds-owner-after-being-lost-13694857/#.VYQ83Z9OLNE.facebook#ixzz3xjkja3XG

"GET READY Australia: You can now board a plane using a chip in your hand.

Andreas Sjöström, the vice president of a Paris-based tech firm, has successfully completed an experiment which allowed him to board a flight using only a chip implanted in his hand to pass through the airport.

A near-field communication chip can communicate with an NFC (Near Field Communication) reading device to transmit information.

It’s similar to the technology that, only last October, tech developer Patric Lanhed used to make digital payments.

Sjöström documented his trip to the airport in which he was able to pass from security all the way to his flight using only the information stored under his skin. He even managed to access an airport lounge by simply waving his palm."

More here: http://www.news.com.au/travel/travel-advice/flights/now-you-can-board-a-plane-just-by-waving-your-hand/news-story/12bc677a48c629e5742ebebae848d5f4

"About 2.7 million Americans served in the Iraq and Afghanistan wars, and at least 20 per cent of them have Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD).

The US Defense Advanced Research Project Agency (Darpa) says it can reduce this number by treating war veterans using chip implants.

Researchers at the organisation say wireless 'neuroprosthetic' brain implants will also help restore memory functions and heal traumatic brain injuries."

Source  here

"A group of 'biohackers' in Germany has implanted LED lights under their skin.

The men each had a Northstar V1 chip - which is about the size of a large coin - implanted into their hands.

The chip features a ring of LED lights and is designed to be able to light up tattoos from beneath the skin, emulating the bioluminescence of jellyfish.

[A group of 'biohackers' in Germany has implanted LED lights under their skin. The men each had a Northstar V1 chip - which is about the size of a large coin - implanted into their hands]
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A group of 'biohackers' in Germany has implanted LED lights under their skin. The men each had a Northstar V1 chip - which is about the size of a large coin - implanted into their hands

The 15 minute surgical procedure was offered by Pittsburgh-based Grindhouse Wetware which claims to use 'safe' technology to create cyborgs.

It was carried out by Swedish tattoo artist, Jowan Österlund, over the weekend at the German city's Cyborg Fair."

 

More here

"MANILA, Philippines – The next big thing in computing could be a glass-encased chip embedded under the skin of your left hand.

Think of it as an extension of the wearables that can track your movement, your sleep, your heart and pulse rate now. Chip implants can do so much more.

In its early stages today, it can store data that can be read by Near Field Communication (NFC) readers. Technically speaking you can open your door, your car just by scanning your hand in the NFC reader. It can serve as your key or access pass to the gym, the library, the office, or wherever is it that requires identification.

If you think that chips embedded in the human body can turn you into a cyborg, fear not because the reality is less frightening than that, according to Hanness Sjoblad, Chief Disruption Officer and Founder, BioNyfiken.

In a presentation entitled “Chirping Humans: The Internet of Things Becomes the Internet of Us,” at the Kaspersky Lab APAC Cyber Security Summit in Malaysia recently, Sjöblad, along with Rainer Bock and Sergey Lozhkin of Kaspersky Lab, explained that while still a rarity (only around 10,000 people around the world have chips implanted in their hand), it is fast gaining attention, especially in Europe and the US.

The use cases are built around the ease and convenience of not having to carry around too many things in your wallet or your handbag. Just scan your hand and you’re good to go.

Sjoblad said there were many interface moments in computing history that made human interaction with computers a lot simpler. Using computers before Windows, for example, is an absolute pain. It’s the same way with using the Internet before the Web browsers. Windows and Web browsers are only some of the landmarks in computer interfaces that have made it very easy for people to interact with computers.

“My personal take is that implants represent a similar interface moment between humans and technology because of the rise of the Internet of Things (IoT),” Sjoblad said. “Our world will be filled with connected things. If you have a smart device in your hand you have automatic way to interact with technology.”

Defined as the network of physical objects embedded with software, sensors and connectivity, IoT is indeed growing rapidly. Juniper Research recently reported  that the number of IoT connected devices is on track to reach 13.4 billion this year and is expected to rise to 38.5 billion by 2020. These connected things have varied applications in retail, agriculture, smart buildings and smart grid applications, to name only a few."

More here