"Or even less appealing, the state of this patient could be so severe, that they require full time skilled nursing care in the confines of a nursing home or assisted living facility.
“you could take a device and instead of the patient wearing it on his or her wrist or clothes, a physician implants that device in the chest”
Imagine much like a FitBit, you could take a device and instead of the patient wearing it on his or her wrist or clothes, a physician implants that device in the chest. That device then has wires that run underneath the skin to various nerves in the body and to the deep parts of the brain. That device can then send specific amounts of electricity to the nervous system at various times to disrupt the diseased pathway and restore the patient to normal health. "

Source: https://www.europeanpharmaceuticalreview.com/news/47692/imot-healthcare/

"...An instrument no bigger than an inhaler lodges a needle into the back of Benigeri’s arm. Woo removes his hand to reveal a white plate sitting just above the implant. Benigeri smiles.
Read more at https://www.businessinsider.com/san-francisco-biohacking-continuous-glucose-monitors-2017-1#To0MjhyLcHHBIhcD.99

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Authoralexanderhayes

"A document obtained by New Scientist reveals that the tech giant's collaboration with the UK's National Health Service goes far beyond what has been publicly announced. The document -- a data-sharing agreement between Google-owned artificial intelligence company DeepMind and the Royal Free NHS Trust -- gives the clearest picture yet of what the company is doing and what sensitive data it now has access to. The agreement gives DeepMind access to a wide range of healthcare data on the 1.6 million patients who pass through three London hospitals.

It includes logs of day-to-day hospital activity, such as records of the location and status of patients – as well as who visits them and when. The hospitals will also share the results of certain pathology and radiology tests.

As well as receiving this continuous stream of new data, DeepMind has access to the historical data that the Royal Free trust submits to the Secondary User Service (SUS) database – the NHS’s centralised record of all hospital treatments in the UK. This includes data from critical care and accident and emergency departments.

Google says it has no commercial plans for DeepMind’s work with Royal Free and that the current pilots are being done for free. But the data to which Royal Free is giving DeepMind access is hugely valuable. It may have to destroy its copy of the data when the agreement expires next year, but that gives ample time to mine it for health insights."

Source: https://www.newscientist.com/article/20864...
IBM is creating a computing system, called a neural network and powered by the company’s TrueNorth chip, that can study the brain wave patterns that indicate a seizure. The company hopes that such a system could someday be built into mobile devices which can warn, and possibly even prevent, epileptic seizures.

Tech companies like Google and Facebook already are using neural networks to perform computing tasks like image and voice recognition, but they run them via the cloud and on large machine-learning data centers. In contrast, IBM’s postage stamp-sized TrueNorth chip consumes over 1,000 times less power than a conventional processor of similar size, making it ideal to run on existing mobile devices. Moreover, it’s built using a new architecture patterned after neurons of the human brain, making it more efficient.

The advanced machine intelligence software in the chip has myriad uses potentially, but researcher Stefan Harrer and his team at IBM Research Australia are focusing on how the chip can support a neural network that is capable of predicting seizures, based on what it learns from actual EEG readings from epilepsy patients, reports Wired.

”We’re trying to extract all the meaningful information from all the background noise. We want to be able to detect a specific seizure for a specific patient,” Harrer told the online magazine.

He and his team plan to use the chip with an external computer, and eventually a wearable device, that will work in tandem with a brain implant. The implant would send EEG information to the TrueNorth device, which would then use the data to predict the possibility of an epileptic seizure, and warn the patient beforehand, according to Digital Trends.

”We want to do this on a wearable system that you put on a subject — on a patient — and have it do analysis in real-time, 24/7. That’s the only way this technology will have an impact beyond cool research papers,” Harrer told Wired.

Later, such a device could be sophisticated enough to be capable not only of detecting an impending seizure attack, but ultimately preventing it by sending electrical impulses.

Existing device-based therapies to treat epileptic seizures also rely on electric stimulation.

FDA approved in 2013, the RNS Stimulator is implanted under the scalp and delivers electrical impulses to normalize brain activity. The device has been shown to decrease the frequency of seizures in epileptic patients. Companies such as Medtronic, St. Jude, NeuroPace, and others, are developing and marketing neurostimulators that address neurological disorders.

Meanwhile, other researchers are exploring other technologies to treat these disorders. A National Institutes of Health (NIH) study is looking at how biodegradable silk brain implants can prevent seizures, while researchers at the University of California Irvine are testing how optogenetic lasers targeted at specific areas of the brain can inhibit seizure activity.

The BRAIN (Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies) Initiative is a public/private collaboration with the goal of devising technologies that will advance our understanding of the brain, including the development of intelligent devices to track and treat abnormal brain activity in people with epilepsy, Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, autism, and other neurological disorders.
— http://www.meddeviceonline.com/doc/ibm-aims-to-make-brain-implant-to-predict-stop-seizures-0001

Source: http://www.meddeviceonline.com/doc/ibm-aims-to-make-brain-implant-to-predict-stop-seizures-0001 

5. The pros and cons of human-implanted RFID chips
The supporters of human-implanted RFID chips believe that such chips will allow the governments to locate fugitives, witnesses of crimes, and missing persons. The authorities of Indonesia’s province Irian Jaya even discussed the use of implanted RFID chips for the monitoring of persons infected with HIV. Such a monitoring will allow the authorities to act in case that some of the monitored people conducts activities that may lead to infection of other people. Probably because the existing human-implanted RFID chips do not allow GPS tracking, the authorities of Irian Jaya did not adopt legal provisions concerning the use of RFID chips. However, in the future GPS implants can be created. The appearance of such implants may renew the discussions concerning tracking of HIV-infected people.
The opponents of human-implanted RFID chips argue that such chips are associated with security risks, cause health problems, contradict to religious doctrines, and may be forcefully implemented in employees. The security risks of such devices have been already discussed in this article. In relation to health problems, the aforementioned paragraph from a document of FDA clearly indicates the risks for the health caused by RFID chips. Moreover, the opponents state that the use of human-implanted RFID chips may lead to cancer. These allegations are based on scientific studies carried out from 1996 to 2006. The studies found that lab mice and rats injected with microchips sometimes developed cancerous tumors around the microchips.
In relation to the religious doctrines, many Christians believe that the implantation of chips may be fulfillment of the prophecy of the mark of the beast mentioned in the Book of Revelation of the New Testament. The Book of Revelation states that the devil will force “all people, great and small, rich and poor, free and slave, to receive a mark on their right hands or on their foreheads, so that they could not buy or sell unless they had the mark, which is the name of the beast or the number of its name.” It is also worth mentioning that, according to the Islam, body modifications constitute “haram,” an Arabic term meaning “forbidden.” This is because such modifications involve changing the body, a creation of Allah.
Pertaining to the forceful implantation of RFID chips, it should be pointed out that, in June 2004, a former attorney general in Mexico required eighteen employees to implement chips allowing them to access a sensitive records room. In order to prevent employers from requiring their employees to implement RFID chips, several U.S. States adopted laws prohibiting forced microchip implants in humans. These states include Wisconsin, North Dakota, California, Georgia, and Virginia.

More here

"But the future, Gasson says, is going to focus on implantable technology for healthy people. Part of the reason is that we continually look for ways to make our lives easier. The question is whether we’re willing accept both the unintended and unknown consequences that come with giving up partial control of our bodies to technology."

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 CBS2 has learned that prescription medications as we know them may soon be a thing in the past.

As CBS2’s Kristine Johnson reported, they could be replaced with tiny, implantable microchips that can treat, and potentially cure, dozens of chronic diseases with “high-tech healing.”

“The chip will cure some diseases, and the chip will prevent others,” said Dr. Kevin Tracey of the Feinstein Institute for Medical Research on Long Island.

The chip is implanted in the body, where it sends little electrical currents telling the nervous system to tell the body to heal itself.

“The diseases that can be treated by this approach is a lengthy list — cancer, diabetes, heart disease, stroke, Alzheimer’s,” Tracey said.

The chip is Tracey’s brainchild. He is a neurosurgeon with the institute, and his efforts have launched a new field in healthcare–known as bioelectronics.

“The promise of bioelectronic medicine  is to restore the activity of nerves whose function, for whatever reason — disease or aging — are not functioning properly,” he said.

Tracey said the technology is extremely precise, and there are no side effects. He compares it to how a pacemaker controls the nerves of the heart, except these new devices  will control the nerves of the immune system.

“Potentially nerves to tumors, to cancer cells; nerves to the bowel and bladder,” Tracey said.

Clinical trials for multiple chips are currently underway, and positive results have already been reported in treating conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis and even appetite control.

“I figured, what did I have to lose?” said Virginia Valles, who participated in a clinical trial.

Virginia Valles was one of the first to test a bioelectronic device  for weight loss. Since starting the trial four years ago, she has lost nearly 100 pounds.

“You get this feeling of fullness. It’s like you just ate a nice, big meal,” said Dr. Ken Fujikoa, a weight-loss researcher at the Scripps Research Institute in San Diego.

Instead of disappearing, drug makers such as Glaxo Smith Kline are looking ahead and funding research in this next frontier.

“Every single disease that we have looked at, we have found we could make medicines bioelectronically,” said Dr. Moncef Slaoui of Glaxo Smith Kline.

Bioelectronic devices are controlled by a smartphone or tablet that is programmed and monitored by the patient’s doctor.