Elise Thomas writes at Hopes & Fears:

"Right now, in a handful of computing labs scattered across the world, new software is being developed which has the potential to completely change our relationship with technology. Affective computing is about creating technology which recognizes and responds to your emotions. Using webcams, microphones or biometric sensors, the software uses a person's physical reactions to analyze their emotional state, generating data which can then be used to monitor, mimic or manipulate that person’s emotions."

[...]

"Corporations spend billions each year trying to build "authentic" emotional connections to their target audiences. Marketing research is one of the most prolific research fields around, conducting thousands of studies on how to more effectively manipulate consumers’ decision-making. Advertisers are extremely interested in affective computing and particularly in a branch known as emotion analytics, which offers unprecedented real-time access to consumers' emotional reactions and the ability to program alternative responses depending on how the content is being received.

For example, if two people watch an advertisement with a joke and only one person laughs, the software can be programmed to show more of the same kind of advertising to the person who laughs while trying different sorts of advertising on the person who did not laugh to see if it's more effective. In essence, affective computing could enable advertisers to create individually-tailored advertising en masse."

"Say 15 years from now a particular brand of weight loss supplements obtains a particular girl's information and locks on. When she scrolls through her Facebook, she sees pictures of rail-thin celebrities, carefully calibrated to capture her attention. When she turns on the TV, it automatically starts on an episode of "The Biggest Loser," tracking her facial expressions to find the optimal moment for a supplement commercial. When she sets her music on shuffle, it "randomly" plays through a selection of the songs which make her sad. This goes on for weeks. 

Now let's add another layer. This girl is 14, and struggling with depression. She's being bullied in school. Having become the target of a deliberate and persistent campaign by her technology to undermine her body image and sense of self-worth, she's at risk of making some drastic choices."

 

Source: http://www.hopesandfears.com/hopes/now/int...

Computer security expert and privacy specialist Bruce Schneier writes:

The Internet of Things is the name given to the computerization of everything in our lives. Already you can buy Internet-enabled thermostats, light bulbs, refrigerators, and cars. Soon everything will be on the Internet: the things we own, the things we interact with in public, autonomous things that interact with each other.

These “things” will have two separate parts. One part will be sensors that collect data about us and our environment. Already our smartphones know our location and, with their onboard accelerometers, track our movements. Things like our thermostats and light bulbs will know who is in the room. Internet-enabled street and highway sensors will know how many people are out and about­ — and eventually who they are. Sensors will collect environmental data from all over the world.

The other part will be actuators. They’ll affect our environment. Our smart thermostats aren’t collecting information about ambient temperature and who’s in the room for nothing; they set the temperature accordingly. Phones already know our location, and send that information back to Google Maps and Waze to determine where traffic congestion is; when they’re linked to driverless cars, they’ll automatically route us around that congestion. Amazon already wants autonomous drones to deliver packages. The Internet of Things will increasingly perform actions for us and in our name.

Increasingly, human intervention will be unnecessary. The sensors will collect data. The system’s smarts will interpret the data and figure out what to do. And the actuators will do things in our world. You can think of the sensors as the eyes and ears of the Internet, the actuators as the hands and feet of the Internet, and the stuff in the middle as the brain. This makes the future clearer. The Internet now senses, thinks, and acts.

We’re building a world-sized robot, and we don’t even realize it.
Source: https://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/201...

More here

A Swedish office block is offering workers the opportunity to have a microchip implanted under the skin of their hands. The radio frequency identification (RFID) chip, about the size of a grain of rice, lets users open doors, swap contact details or use the photocopier, all at the wave of a hand. Matthew Stock reports.

Summary: Forget wearable technology, Swedish office worker Lin Kowalska is having it implanted under her skin. A microchip - about the size of a grain of rice - is injected into her hand. (SOUNDBITE) (English) LIN KOWALSKA, OFFICE WORKER FROM COMPANY "GIVESOME", SAYING: "It felt pretty scary, but at the same time it felt very modern, very 2015." Instead of ID cards or passcodes, workers who sign up for the implant can now open doors with the wave of a hand. The chip also currently lets workers swap contact details via a smartphone and operate a photocopier. Patrick Mesterton, co-founder of the Epicenter tech hub in central Stockholm, sees plenty of future applications for the implant. (SOUNDBITE) (English) PATRICK MESTERTON, CO-FOUNDER AND CEO OF EPICENTER OFFICE, SAYING: "Some of the future areas of use I think, like anything today where you would use a pin code or a key or a card, so payments I think is one area. I think also for health care reasons that you can sort of communicate with your doctor and you can data on what you eat and what your physical status is." The radio-frequency identification chip is made from pyrex glass and contains an antenna and microchip, with no need for batteries While some workers may feel uneasy at the prospect of literally taking their work home with them, the designers say the chip is completely safe and secure. (SOUNDBITE) (English) PATRICK MESTERTON, CO-FOUNDER AND CEO OF EPICENTER OFFICE, SAYING: "You have your own identification code and you're sending that to something else which you have to grant access to, so there's no one else that can sort of follow you on your ID so to say. It's you who decides who gets access to that ID." The chip is in no way mandatory, and the limited benefits the implant currently offers may put many people off. But with wearable tech becoming more ubiquitous, the merging of biology and technology could represent a growing trend.

 Rogers

Rogers

 TeleGeography.com

TeleGeography.com

Thanks for the link KMA.

An article from the Journal of Exercise Rehabilitation. Definitely worth a look if you feel you are addicted to your device.

Full citation is: Hyunna Kim* (2013), "Exercise rehabilitation for smartphone addiction", J Exerc Rehabil. Dec, 9(6): pp. 500–505. Published online Dec 31, doi:  10.12965/jer.130080 PMCID: PMC3884868

"Internet addiction after launching smartphone is becoming serious. Therefore this paper has attempted to sketch out the diverse addiction treatment and then check the feasibility of exercise rehabilitation. The reason to addict the internet or smartphone is personalized individual characters related personal psychological and emotional factors and social environmental factors around them. We have shown that 2 discernible approaches due to 2 different addiction causes: that is behavioral treatment and complementary treatment. In the behavioral treatment, cognitive behavioral approach (CBT) is representative methods for changing additive thoughts and behaviors. Motivational interviewing (MI) is also the brief approach for persons not ready to change their behavior. Mindfulness behavioral cognitive treatment (MBCT) also the adapted treatment based on CBT. There are different types following the emphatic point, mindfulness-based relapse prevention (MBRP) or mindfulness oriented recovery enhancement (MORE). It is apparent that therapeutic recreation, music therapy using drumming activity, and art therapy are useful complementary treatment. Exercise rehabilitation contained the systematic procedures and comprehensive activities compared to previous addiction treatments by contents and techniques. Exercise rehabilitation can treat both physical symptoms at first and mental problems in the next step. So more evidence-based exercise rehabilitation researches need to do, but it is highly probable that exercise rehab can apply for smartphone addiction.
Keywords: Smartphone addiction, Exercise rehabilitation, Cognitive behavioral therapy, Complementary treatment"

Now worth comparing the claims made by Michael and Michael in their research about a new 'breed' of Obsessive Compulsive Disorders (OCD) that will need to be defined with respect to new emerging technologies acting as triggers toward these behaviours. See for instance this media article in the Illawarra Mercury summarising the concerns.