"...It uses AI to learn which faces are important to you, then starts automatically capturing photos and videos. I was similarly excited by early promotional videos of parents in Google Glass playing with their young kids, capturing photos and videos in a hands-free way that didn’t interrupt the moment." 

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https://www.theverge.com/2017/10/5/16428708/google-clips-camera-privacy-parents-children

https://www.theverge.com/2017/10/4/16405200/google-clips-camera-ai-photos-video-hands-on-wi-fi-direct

https://techcrunch.com/2017/10/04/google-clips-is-a-new-249-smart-camera-that-you-can-wear/

"A document obtained by New Scientist reveals that the tech giant's collaboration with the UK's National Health Service goes far beyond what has been publicly announced. The document -- a data-sharing agreement between Google-owned artificial intelligence company DeepMind and the Royal Free NHS Trust -- gives the clearest picture yet of what the company is doing and what sensitive data it now has access to. The agreement gives DeepMind access to a wide range of healthcare data on the 1.6 million patients who pass through three London hospitals.

It includes logs of day-to-day hospital activity, such as records of the location and status of patients – as well as who visits them and when. The hospitals will also share the results of certain pathology and radiology tests.

As well as receiving this continuous stream of new data, DeepMind has access to the historical data that the Royal Free trust submits to the Secondary User Service (SUS) database – the NHS’s centralised record of all hospital treatments in the UK. This includes data from critical care and accident and emergency departments.

Google says it has no commercial plans for DeepMind’s work with Royal Free and that the current pilots are being done for free. But the data to which Royal Free is giving DeepMind access is hugely valuable. It may have to destroy its copy of the data when the agreement expires next year, but that gives ample time to mine it for health insights."

Source: https://www.newscientist.com/article/20864...

Axon creates connected technologies for truth in public safety.

"....TASER and Microsoft have formed a unique partnership that brings together two powerful technology platforms to meet the unique needs of law enforcement today. With unmatched technology innovation and industry-leading security, the partnership is enabling transformation in public safety practices while also promoting greater transparency and trust between law enforcement and private citizens."

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This man knows a lot about what is happening in this area - https://ccj.asu.edu/content/michael-white

A great summation of uberveillance in relation to FitBit-style trackers by Richard Chirgwin of The Register. Article here 

ca7ch.jpg

"...CA7CH Lightbox is a fun new way to snap pictures, stream short videos and share your life with friends. Live and hands-free, CA7CH Lightbox brings together a miniature wearable camera, your smart phone, and the internet to create a new way of sharing engaging moments with others."

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 Image:  IT News

Image: IT News

“We are going to have a lot of fun around the information management aspects of body worn video – let alone the more prosaic problem of how am I going to get this stuff from the field to a central repository with as few moving parts as possible."

Read more: http://www.itnews.com.au/News/387109,nsw-police-cio-prepares-for-copper-cam-data-deluge.aspx#ixzz33S4pamm6

Documentary from thoughtmaybe.com (About)

   Douglas Rushkoff     2014     53:04    Social media networks purport the ability to interact with culture—talking directly to artists, celebrities, movies, brands, and even one another—in ways never before possible. But is this real empowerment? Or do marketing companies still hold the upper hand?  Generation Like  explores how the perennial quest for identity and connection is usurped in the pervasive game of cat-and-mouse by vast corporate power in the extensive machine for consumerism that is now the online environment. The audience becomes the marketer; buzz is subtly controlled and manipulated by and from real-time behavioural insights; and the content generated is sold back to the audience in the name of participation. But does the audience even think they’re being used? Do they care? Or does the perceived chance to be the ‘next big star’ make it all worth it?

Douglas Rushkoff   2014   53:04

Social media networks purport the ability to interact with culture—talking directly to artists, celebrities, movies, brands, and even one another—in ways never before possible. But is this real empowerment? Or do marketing companies still hold the upper hand? Generation Like explores how the perennial quest for identity and connection is usurped in the pervasive game of cat-and-mouse by vast corporate power in the extensive machine for consumerism that is now the online environment. The audience becomes the marketer; buzz is subtly controlled and manipulated by and from real-time behavioural insights; and the content generated is sold back to the audience in the name of participation. But does the audience even think they’re being used? Do they care? Or does the perceived chance to be the ‘next big star’ make it all worth it?

As these Creative Commons pictures show the enrolment and registration process of all Indian residents by the Unique Identification Authority of India (UIDAI). The 12-digit unique number will be stored in a centralized database and linked to the basic demographics and biometric information – photograph, ten fingerprints and iris of each individual. This replaces paper-based cards. Photos by Chirantani Vidyapith Howrah and Fotokannan.

Image: http://blogs.lt.vt.edu/techteams/2014/04/08/google-glass-a-tech-teams-white-paper/

"...Student learning outcomes: Glass can be used in situations where it is difficult to observe student behavior. For example, problem based learning and active learning (flipped) classrooms often require students to work in teams. Given the number of teams working simultaneously in large classroom settings it is difficult to observe each one long enough to see the arc of their interaction. Students working in groups can wear and use Glass to record what has been going on for self-evaluation and instructor review. In another example, students can use Glass to do field work that is later shared with the class for dissection, discussion, and shared learning."

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"...."The question is, 'Will Google Glass become mainstream and popular?' I guess I am worried that we have already made that decision. It has already been precluded by the question of whether we will allow a few large private technology companies like Google to determine by decree how we behave in contemporary society. And the answer seems to be yes."

"....We use the information that your mobile phone already collects about your current location and whereabouts in order to make personalized suggestions about places to go, things to see, and stuff to do, that we think you would find interesting."

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"....Within The Human Locomotome Project, we have created a new technology utilizing mathematical models and diagnostics tools that can identify risks of age-related diseases on early stages through analysis of everyday activity movement. Access to this data provides awareness of your health factors, allowing for early prevention and lifestyle changes."

"...This is the official Autographer app. It allows you to review, tag, share and delete images from your Autographer when you’re on the go. Preview and browse all of the images on your Autographer in chronological order. Select a single image or use several to create GIFs . Share these directly from your phone. You can also tag images and mark your favourites for later."

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"...I definitely see a revolution in how some people will work..."

Here are the ten core questions I asked of Mark today:

1. Mark, I have you down in my G+ circles as a colleague. I note you have 290 followers. How have you managed to keep such a quiet profile amidst your incredible achievements?
2. You claim not to be a #glassexplorer  or at least not part of that online community. What do you call your developments then with #glass  or at least with the wider sub-sets of alternative providers?
3. I met with you at ISMAR13 in Adelaide, South Australia. Shortly after that event another occurred in the same university with Professor Andrew Goldsmith, Cybercrimes. What do you see as the nexus between augmented reality (AR) and that of unmanned aerial systems? (UAS)
4. Christchurch is a lovely part of the world. Given you've just returned from Israel what do you consider to be the hotbeds of technology development in the world at present?
5. What does the term privacy mean to you? 
6. In a world of big data, open data and the ripples still subsiding from the NSA and Snowden case what do you see as the greatest challenge for those who choose to route their quantified selves through servers in other countries (the cloud)? Is wearable technology responsible in some way for a shift in humanity?
7. The #glassroom  - tell us who takes your C22: The Glass Class: Designing Wearable Interfaces and why ?
8. I take it your familiar with +Thad Starner - it appears 'empathetic' appears in both of your current discourses - can you tell us more about what you mean by using augmented reality to create empathetic experiences?
9. Is artificial intelligence (AI) set to leapfrog wearables as the revolution or do we have to wait and see  #glass  sweep across Australasia first?
10. Will #glass  cause revolt, upturn apple-carts, challenge stereotypes, ubiquitously slip amongst the tools of the K-2 educator? What the key challenges that we face as humanity with #glass or is this set to be a US based phenomena only?

Body. Mind. Quantified.

"Accurate monitoring of brain and heart health is critical to overall wellnes. People around the world are seeking products that give them the insights they need for optimal mind and body performance. At NeuroSky, our biosensors provide an important foundation for thousands of products that meet this growing need."

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 "When you know where you were when something happened, you can usually infer or remember a  tremendous amount of related things about that experience, which makes the data secondary, and the experience primary."   Shane Luke, CPO, Recon"

"When you know where you were when something happened, you can usually infer or remember a 
tremendous amount of related things about that experience, which makes the data secondary, and the experience primary." 

Shane Luke, CPO, Recon"

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  Recon Instruments’ first product to hit the market was Transcend in October 2010. Transcend are the world’s first alpine goggles with GPS data viewable through a head mounted display providing real-time feedback to the user including speed, latitude/longitude, altitude, vertical distance travelled, total distance travelled, chrono/stopwatch mode, a run-counter, temperature and time. It is also the only pair of goggles that link to a post-processing software, Recon HQ and an online sharing community HQ Online. Here users can playback, re-live and analyze not only their stats on Recon HQ but others’ on HQ Online where the user’s runs and highlights are overlaid on satellite imagery.

Recon Instruments’ first product to hit the market was Transcend in October 2010. Transcend are the world’s first alpine goggles with GPS data viewable through a head mounted display providing real-time feedback to the user including speed, latitude/longitude, altitude, vertical distance travelled, total distance travelled, chrono/stopwatch mode, a run-counter, temperature and time. It is also the only pair of goggles that link to a post-processing software, Recon HQ and an online sharing community HQ Online. Here users can playback, re-live and analyze not only their stats on Recon HQ but others’ on HQ Online where the user’s runs and highlights are overlaid on satellite imagery.

 Source: The Institute (IEEE News Source)  http://theinstitute.ieee.org/technology-focus/technology-topic/the-value-of-privacy

Source: The Institute (IEEE News Source)

http://theinstitute.ieee.org/technology-focus/technology-topic/the-value-of-privacy

"A PRECAUTIONARY TALE

Not all are as optimistic as Prasad about the future of the IoT. While users may have control over who in the general public sees their information, the bigger concern for consumer privacy expert Katherine Albrecht is the question of who owns the data. She is an executive with StartPage, a search engine that does not collect or share personal information, and StartMail, an encrypted e-mail service.

An article coauthored with IEEE Senior Member Katina Michael, “Connected: To Everyone and Everything,” in the Winter 2013 issue of IEEE Technology and Society Magazine, puts Albrecht’s concern bluntly: “[Consumers] may think we’re in charge of our shopper cards and our mobile apps and our smart fridges—but … let’s not fool ourselves. [The information] is not ours. It belongs to Google, and IBM, and Cisco Systems…and the global Mega-Corp that owns your local supermarket. If you don’t believe us, just try removing ‘your’ data from their databases.”

Michael is the associate dean international of the University of Wollongong Faculty of Engineering and Information Sciences, in Australia, and editor in chief of IEEE Technology and Society Magazine.

To prepare for the interconnected future, businesses and governments are outlining measures to be taken while new policies are developed. The European Union, for example, outlined such measures in its report “IoT Privacy, Data Protection, Information Security,” published in January 2013. One recommendation is to develop privacy-friendly default settings on IoT products and services that would give users more control over what information is shared with others. Furthermore, it suggests that IoT networks give individuals the rights to their own data. In 2012, participants at the Open IoT Assembly—an initiative to envision a future with the IoT—developed an “IoT Bill of Rights” at a two-day conference in London that calls for transparency of IoT processes and the preservation of privacy. It also calls for people to have access to their personal data.

Despite potential risks to privacy, companies are betting their customers will see the advantages that the IoT will bring them, says Colcher. But some groups advocate that consumers have the power to slow down or even stop the advancement of the IoT. Not Colcher. “The inclusion of the IoT all around us is inevitable,” he says. “The only thing to do now is to prepare the best we can.”"