Computer security expert and privacy specialist Bruce Schneier writes:

The Internet of Things is the name given to the computerization of everything in our lives. Already you can buy Internet-enabled thermostats, light bulbs, refrigerators, and cars. Soon everything will be on the Internet: the things we own, the things we interact with in public, autonomous things that interact with each other.

These “things” will have two separate parts. One part will be sensors that collect data about us and our environment. Already our smartphones know our location and, with their onboard accelerometers, track our movements. Things like our thermostats and light bulbs will know who is in the room. Internet-enabled street and highway sensors will know how many people are out and about­ — and eventually who they are. Sensors will collect environmental data from all over the world.

The other part will be actuators. They’ll affect our environment. Our smart thermostats aren’t collecting information about ambient temperature and who’s in the room for nothing; they set the temperature accordingly. Phones already know our location, and send that information back to Google Maps and Waze to determine where traffic congestion is; when they’re linked to driverless cars, they’ll automatically route us around that congestion. Amazon already wants autonomous drones to deliver packages. The Internet of Things will increasingly perform actions for us and in our name.

Increasingly, human intervention will be unnecessary. The sensors will collect data. The system’s smarts will interpret the data and figure out what to do. And the actuators will do things in our world. You can think of the sensors as the eyes and ears of the Internet, the actuators as the hands and feet of the Internet, and the stuff in the middle as the brain. This makes the future clearer. The Internet now senses, thinks, and acts.

We’re building a world-sized robot, and we don’t even realize it.
Source: https://www.schneier.com/blog/archives/201...

A must watch TED talk for anyone interested in privacy and social media.

Thanks MGM

Axon creates connected technologies for truth in public safety.

"....TASER and Microsoft have formed a unique partnership that brings together two powerful technology platforms to meet the unique needs of law enforcement today. With unmatched technology innovation and industry-leading security, the partnership is enabling transformation in public safety practices while also promoting greater transparency and trust between law enforcement and private citizens."

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This man knows a lot about what is happening in this area - https://ccj.asu.edu/content/michael-white

Now compare to the narrative clip. 


Nymi

The Nymi is the first wearable authentication technology that allows you to take control of your identity through cardiac rhythm recognition. Authenticate once and remain authenticated until the wristband is removed. Move beyond passwords, pins and locks and interact with the technology that fills your daily life with proximity detection and task-based gesture control. The Nymi presents a new and exciting system that grants you access for being you!

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"...This is the official Autographer app. It allows you to review, tag, share and delete images from your Autographer when you’re on the go. Preview and browse all of the images on your Autographer in chronological order. Select a single image or use several to create GIFs . Share these directly from your phone. You can also tag images and mark your favourites for later."

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Synopsis: Martha and Ash are a young couple who move to a remote cottage. But the day after the move, Ash is killed. At the funeral, Martha’s friend Sarah tells her about a new service that lets people stay in touch with the deceased. By using all of Ash’s past online communications and social media profiles, a new, virtual ‘Ash’ can be created. Martha is disgusted by the concept at first, but then in a confused and lonely state she decides to talk to ‘him’…

 Graphic from NSA showing the intent to upscale world-wide automated malware attacks and siphon data to DoD.

Graphic from NSA showing the intent to upscale world-wide automated malware attacks and siphon data to DoD.

In some cases the NSA has masqueraded as a fake Facebook server, using the social media site as a launching pad to infect a target’s computer and exfiltrate files from a hard drive. In others, it has sent out spam emails laced with the malware, which can be tailored to covertly record audio from a computer’s microphone and take snapshots with its webcam. The hacking systems have also enabled the NSA to launch cyberattacks by corrupting and disrupting file downloads or denying access to websites.
The implants being deployed were once reserved for a few hundred hard-to-reach targets, whose communications could not be monitored through traditional wiretaps. But the documents analyzed by The Intercept show how the NSA has aggressively accelerated its hacking initiatives in the past decade by computerizing some processes previously handled by humans. The automated system – codenamed TURBINE – is designed to “allow the current implant network to scale to large size (millions of implants) by creating a system that does automated control implants by groups instead of individually.”

...

When TURBINE implants exfiltrate data from infected computer systems, the TURMOIL sensors automatically identify the data and return it to the NSA for analysis. And when targets are communicating, the TURMOIL system can be used to send alerts or “tips” to TURBINE, enabling the initiation of a malware attack.

The NSA identifies surveillance targets based on a series of data “selectors” as they flow across Internet cables. These selectors, according to internal documents, can include email addresses, IP addresses, or the unique “cookies” containing a username or other identifying information that are sent to a user’s computer by websites such as Google, Facebook, Hotmail, Yahoo, and Twitter.

Other selectors the NSA uses can be gleaned from unique Google advertising cookies that track browsing habits, unique encryption key fingerprints that can be traced to a specific user, and computer IDs that are sent across the Internet when a Windows computer crashes or updates.

What’s more, the TURBINE system operates with the knowledge and support of other governments, some of which have participated in the malware attacks.

Classification markings on the Snowden documents indicate that NSA has shared many of its files on the use of implants with its counterparts in the so-called Five Eyes surveillance alliance – the United Kingdom, Canada, New Zealand, and Australia.
Source: https://firstlook.org/theintercept/article...
Request for Permission.clipular.png

"....Vodo serves as the bridge between Google Glass™ and the world you live and work in.

With Vodo Drive, you'll be able to share pictures, video, and text from your Google Glass to a folder you're permitted to on Google Drive™. You can also watch a folder on Google Drive and have it send new images and text files to your Google Glass.

As a special case, Vodo List can turn the spreadsheets you use on Google Drive into lists that you can control through Google Glass.

Vodo Task will let you set alarms and reminders based on time or location."

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"....The “self” is too narrow. The quantified self movement isn’t about me, explicitly — I care dramatically more about what all of the past, present and future “me” amounts to. We’re looking at a new oral tradition — the sum and summary of my life. It’s my story, spoken through data and technology.

The “quantified” word suggests enumeration, which is an input, but not an output (and outputs are where the most interesting stuff happens). “Logging” likewise implies input only, the act of collecting of data — warehousing, in short. "

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Mobile devices and wearable technology are redefining the phrase "personal computer" - no longer conjuring up thoughts of desktop or even laptop devices, but rather devices smaller - and more powerful - than many ever dreamed possible. The mobile phone in your hand - the one that has more computing performance than a 1979 Cray Supercomputer - is quickly being transformed into a mesh of wearable devices, allowing you remain connected 24x7 and throw off more private data than ever.

With the rise of mobile and wearable tech comes the ability for services providers, their partners and, well, just about anybody with a few dollars, to track where you are, what you are doing, who you are doing it with, where you've been and how quickly you're likely to be doing it again at your next "habitual" destination. Oh, and the likely route you are going to take.

Issues abound: what really differentiates mobile devices from wearable tech, and how are their privacy issues different? Why are we being pushed into an always-on/always-tracked society, and what is this data likely to reveal about ourselves over time?

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"...We’ve created a beautiful smartphone app and desktop software to make storing, sharing, and curating Autography fast and simple wherever you are. Check out our ecographic to learn how the complete experience works together"

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"The research examined the six distinctive types of wearable tech user, and how businesses need to take advantage of them:
1.            Curious: people who have no specific need, but are more interested in playing with the technology. Rackspace argues businesses need to focus on simplicity of use and attractiveness of design in order to keep these customers.
2.            Controllers: people who will only purchase once they know exactly what they want to do with it, and that they can manage their data in an appropriate fashion. The paper advocates that this demographic is going to be vital when considering second and third generation devices
3.            Quantified sellers: people who want to track themselves as they live their lives; an academic interest. Rackspace notes that these people are “e-hoarders”, needing their data in two or more places, particularly the cloud.
4.            Self-medics: users who wish to utilise wearable tech for m-health. Rackspace argues that, for these users in particular, the data gathering methods need to be spot on – ensuring the “how, when and why” of data collection is transparent.
5.            Finish line fanatics: those for whom the gloss of a shiny new device soon wears off. Understandably, the report advocates that businesses need to capitalise on the initial excitement, advocating giving “real meaning from the data”.
6.            Ubiquitous future: digital natives that will grow up with the next generation of wearable technology. Rackspace argues that, for this generation, privacy will not be an issue, with boosting personal skills the key." 

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