"...It uses AI to learn which faces are important to you, then starts automatically capturing photos and videos. I was similarly excited by early promotional videos of parents in Google Glass playing with their young kids, capturing photos and videos in a hands-free way that didn’t interrupt the moment." 

Read more

https://www.theverge.com/2017/10/5/16428708/google-clips-camera-privacy-parents-children

https://www.theverge.com/2017/10/4/16405200/google-clips-camera-ai-photos-video-hands-on-wi-fi-direct

https://techcrunch.com/2017/10/04/google-clips-is-a-new-249-smart-camera-that-you-can-wear/

 Source: http://www.canadianbusiness.com/lists-and-rankings/most-innovative-companies/interaxon/

Source: http://www.canadianbusiness.com/lists-and-rankings/most-innovative-companies/interaxon/

Now compare to the narrative clip. 


"“Glass is very aware of the user,” he said. “There’s consequences to that, and things to consider and be careful about. But there’s also opportunity for a computer that’s very close to the person.”"

"Google has big hopes for its Glass head-mounted computer, chief among them a desire to make the unit smaller and more comfortable to wear.
Those were just a couple of the goals for a polished version of the device laid out Tuesday by Babak Parviz, the creator of Glass, who is also the director of Google’s “X” special projects division.
“Essentially we’d like to make the technology disappear,” he said during a conference on wearable technology in San Francisco.
“It should be non-intrusive” and as comfortable to wear as regular glasses or a wristwatch, he said.
Shrinking the unit would require advances in optics and photonics, he said. More computing power is also needed to make the device faster at answering people’s questions on the fly, Parviz said.

More here

ca7ch.jpg

"...CA7CH Lightbox is a fun new way to snap pictures, stream short videos and share your life with friends. Live and hands-free, CA7CH Lightbox brings together a miniature wearable camera, your smart phone, and the internet to create a new way of sharing engaging moments with others."

Read more

"....We use the information that your mobile phone already collects about your current location and whereabouts in order to make personalized suggestions about places to go, things to see, and stuff to do, that we think you would find interesting."

Read more

"...This is the official Autographer app. It allows you to review, tag, share and delete images from your Autographer when you’re on the go. Preview and browse all of the images on your Autographer in chronological order. Select a single image or use several to create GIFs . Share these directly from your phone. You can also tag images and mark your favourites for later."

Read more

We're moving closer to the ultimate ID... it not only moves with you, but will be in you.

Tit for tat. Citizens turn camera on police; so police respond by turning cameras on society. Who wins? What next? Memory implants? 

Video can lie because context can be missing- let us not fool ourselves... discussion on wearables as applied to a multitude of applications is the topic of the next IEEE Technology and Society Magazine (June 2014) after this program in 2013. Check out http://sites.ieee.org/istas-2013

Interested readers might also like to look at this pioneering summary from the Point of View Technologies in Law Enforcement Workshop (2012) http://works.bepress.com/kmichael/249/ in addition to the Human Rights and Policing Conference (2013) http://www.ceps.edu.au/events/2013-ceps-human-rights-and-policing-conference/technology-and-forensic-science which featured the work of Mick Keelty et al. 

 Source: http://www.defencesystemsaustralia.com.au/ProductsandServices/RevealRS3.aspx

Source: http://www.defencesystemsaustralia.com.au/ProductsandServices/RevealRS3.aspx

New story here.

"Some officers have already paid for their own miniature cameras, raising concerns about the storage of data on personal computers.

The Keelty Review into the QPS last year flagged privacy issues around the storage of police recordings on home computers. It recommended investigating a solution to storing “big data”.

The camera revelation came after The Courier-Mail won a more than 12-month Right to Information battle to overturn a police decision to keep secret the results of a trial of cameras on Tasers.

It was released after the Information Commissioner overturned the QPS’s decision.

The 2011 review found Taser Cams were operationally ineffective, but recommended investigating body-worn cameras to record all use-of-force incidents after an extension of the trial found the body cameras superior in all areas.

The release of the report comes as the police Ethical Standards Command prepares to interview a Logan woman as part of an investigation into how she lost her eye after being Tasered in February.

Police are unable to rely on footage of the incident as Queensland’s 1000-plus Tasers do not have cameras and police are not issued body-worn video cameras.

An analysis of police use-of-force reports obtained under RTI for 2012 found that of the 63 people stunned by Tasers that year, only five were caught on CCTV.

Queensland Police Union president Ian Leavers said the review findings supported his repeated calls for the QPS to issue body-worn cameras.

“Body-worn cameras are the modern equivalent of the police notebook and should be compulsory equipment for all police,” Mr Leavers said."

Thanks anthropunk!

 Palo Alto police cruisers are now equipped with new video systems, including five cameras instead of a previous two. The above camera is on the exterior of a cruiser. Courtesy Palo Alto Police Department. Source: http://www.paloaltoonline.com/news/2014/03/20/palo-alto-police-embrace-new-recording-technology

Palo Alto police cruisers are now equipped with new video systems, including five cameras instead of a previous two. The above camera is on the exterior of a cruiser. Courtesy Palo Alto Police Department. Source: http://www.paloaltoonline.com/news/2014/03/20/palo-alto-police-embrace-new-recording-technology

  Palo Alto police cruisers are now equipped with new video systems, including five cameras instead of a previous two. Courtesy Palo Alto Police Department.

Palo Alto police cruisers are now equipped with new video systems, including five cameras instead of a previous two. Courtesy Palo Alto Police Department.

"The Palo Alto Police Department has recently installed new video systems on dozens of cruisers, replacing the recording systems that were first installed on police vehicles in 2006. In addition to the usual enhancements one can expect with video upgrades -- high-definition video and high-fidelity audio -- the new recording systems have an additional feature: the ability to record and review what happened before an incident even occurs.

Unlike the previously used Mobile In-Car Video System, which included two cameras on the cruiser, the new systems include five. This means new cameras on the cruisers' sides and rearview mirrors, according a report from the police department.

"We've already had a few cases where actions of our officers that would not have been captured on the old system were completely captured on the new one, which allowed us to have a clear view of what went on," said Lt. Zach Perron, the department's public information manager. "That's exactly what we want to have."

The improvement in audio quality is also significant, he said. Audio recordings in the new systems have far more range and can work "through objects," Perron said."

Read more here.

"Called the Fly6, it is a combination video camera and flashing rear light that promises to make riders more visible while recording what happens behind them. It is fitted to the bike's seat post.

The inventors say it could also help to determine who is responsible when a motor vehicle hits a bicycle from behind – one of the most common causes of serious injury or death among cyclists."

Transient

"...On a chilly morning in early January, I joined a hundred students in a lecture hall on the Georgia Tech campus for a class called Mobile and Ubiquitous Computing. The professor, Thad Starner, looked up at his audience of aspiring programmers, industrial designers, roboticists, and user-interface specialists. He is forty-four, with a boyish face and sideburns that yearn for the 1990s. He wore, as he often does, a black T-shirt and black jeans. “In this class we’re going to talk about four main things,” he said. “Privacy, power and heat, networking on- and off-body, and interface. Every time you make any decision on any four of these dimensions, it’s going to affect the others. It’s always a balancing act.”

Read more

The full article is here.

A piece of history on the PCG.