"....We use the information that your mobile phone already collects about your current location and whereabouts in order to make personalized suggestions about places to go, things to see, and stuff to do, that we think you would find interesting."

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Request for Permission.clipular.png

"....Vodo serves as the bridge between Google Glass™ and the world you live and work in.

With Vodo Drive, you'll be able to share pictures, video, and text from your Google Glass to a folder you're permitted to on Google Drive™. You can also watch a folder on Google Drive and have it send new images and text files to your Google Glass.

As a special case, Vodo List can turn the spreadsheets you use on Google Drive into lists that you can control through Google Glass.

Vodo Task will let you set alarms and reminders based on time or location."

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It is with great joy that MG and I write to let you know that the Uberveillance edited volume is finally in stores and available for purchase. We encourage you to ask your libraries to purchase the volume. Of significance are the coming together of well-known voices in the surveillance field to discuss the definition and impact of uberveillance, including Katherine Albrecht, Roger Clarke, Mark Gasson, Kevin Haggerty, Steve Mann, Ellen McGee, Kevin Warwick, Marcus Wigan and numerous authorities on the topic of microchipping people. This volume contains 17 book chapters, and 7 interviews and panel presentations as well as full referencing of source materials in some 500 pages.

 "Uberveillance" edited volume by Michael and Michael (2014)

"Uberveillance" edited volume by Michael and Michael (2014)

 

CONTENTS PAGE

PART A The Veillances

Chapter 1 Introduction: On the “Birth” of Uberveillance  (pages 1-31) M. G. Michael (University of Wollongong, Australia)

Chapter 2 Veillance: Beyond Surveillance, Dataveillance, Uberveillance, and the Hypocrisy of One-Sided Watching  (pages 32-45) Steve Mann (University of Toronto, Canada)

Chapter 3 Uberveillance: Where Wear and Educative Arrangement  (pages 46-62) Alexander Hayes (University of Wollongong, Australia)

PART B Applications of Humancentric Implantables

Chapter 4 Practical Experimentation with Human Implants  (pages 64-132) Kevin Warwick (University of Reading, UK), Mark N. Gasson (University of Reading, UK)

Chapter 5 Knowledge Recovery: Applications of Technology and Memory  (pages 133-142) Maria E. Burke (University of Salford, UK), Chris Speed (University of Edinburgh, UK)

PART C Adoption of RFID Implants for Humans

Chapter 6 Willingness to Adopt RFID Implants: Do Personality Factors Play a Role in the Acceptance of Uberveillance?  (pages 144-168) Christine Perakslis (Johnson and Wales University, USA)

Chapter 7 Surveilling the Elderly: Emerging Demographic Needs and Social Implications of RFID Chip Technology Use  (pages 169-185) Randy Basham (University of Texas – Arlington, USA)

PART D Tracking and Tracing Laws, Directives, Regulations, and Standards

Chapter 8 Towards the Blanket Coverage DNA Profiling and Sampling of Citizens in England, Wales, and Northern Ireland  (pages 187-207) Katina Michael (University of Wollongong, Australia)

Chapter 9 ID Scanners and Überveillance in the Night-Time Economy: Crime Prevention or Invasion of Privacy?  (pages 208-225) Darren Palmer (Deakin University, Australia), Ian Warren (Deakin University, Australia), Peter Miller (Deakin University, Australia)

Chapter 10 Global Tracking Systems in the Australian Interstate Trucking Industry  (pages 226-234) Jann Karp (C.C.C. Australia, Australia)

Chapter 11 Tracking Legislative Developments in Relation to “Do Not Track” Initiatives  (pages 235-259) Brigette Garbin (University of Queensland, Australia), Kelly Staunton (University of Queensland, Australia), Mark Burdon (University of Queensland, Australia)

Chapter 12 Uberveillance, Standards, and Anticipation: A Case Study on Nanobiosensors in U.S. Cattle  (pages 260-279) Kyle Powys Whyte (Michigan State University, USA), Monica List (Michigan State University, USA), John V. Stone (Michigan State University, USA), Daniel Grooms (Michigan State University, USA), Stephen Gasteyer (Michigan State University, USA), Paul B. Thompson (Michigan State University, USA), Lawrence Busch (Michigan State University, USA), Daniel Buskirk (Michigan State University, USA), Erica Giorda (Michigan State University, USA), Hilda Bouri (Michigan State University, USA)

PART E Health Implications of Microchipping Living Things

Chapter 13 Microchip-Induced Tumors in Laboratory Rodents and Dogs: A Review of the Literature 1990–2006  (pages 281-317) Katherine Albrecht (CASPIAN Consumer Privacy, USA)

PART F Socio-Ethical Implications of RFID Tags and Transponders

Chapter 14 Privacy and Pervasive Surveillance: A Philosophical Analysis  (pages 319-350) Alan Rubel (University of Wisconsin – Madison, USA)

Chapter 15 Neuroethics and Implanted Brain Machine Interfaces  (pages 351-365) Ellen M. McGee (Independent Researcher, USA)

Chapter 16 We Are the Borg! Human Assimilation into Cellular Society  (pages 366-407) Ronnie D. Lipschutz (University of California - Santa Cruz, USA), Rebecca J. Hester (University of Texas Medical Branch, USA)

Chapter 17 Uberveillance and Faith-Based Organizations: A Renewed Moral Imperative  (pages 408-416) Marcus Wigan (Oxford Systematics, Australia & Edinburgh Napier University, UK)

Acronyms and Abbreviations

Compilation of References

About the Contributors

Index

EDITORIAL ADVISORY BOARD

Roba Abbas, University of Wollongong, Australia

Greg Adamson, University of Melbourne, Australia

Katherine Albrecht, CASPIAN, USA

Anas Aloudat, University of Jordan, Jordan

Michael V. Arnold, University of Melbourne, Australia

Emilia Belleboni, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Spain

Rafael Capurro, University of Wisconsin – Milwaukee, USA

Kenneth Foster, University of Pennsylvania, USA

Amal Graafstra, Amal.net, USA

Mireille Hildebrandt, Erasmus University Rotterdam, The Netherlands

Peter Hyland, University of Wollongong, Australia

Nicholas Huber, Accenture, Australia

Indrawati, Institut Manajemen Telkom, Indonesia

Eleni Kosta, K. U. Leuven, Belgium

Ronald Leenes, Tilburg University, The Netherlands

Avner Levin, Ryerson University, Canada

Michael Loui, University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign, USA

Noëmi Manders-Huits, Delft University of Technology, The Netherlands

Keith W. Miller, University of Missouri – St. Louis, USA

Lyria Bennett Moses, University of New South Wales, Australia

Christine Perakslis, Johnson and Wales University, USA

Laura Perusco, Macquarie Bank, UK

Kenneth Pimple, Indiana University – Bloomington, USA

Joseph Savirimuthu, University of Liverpool, UK

Alan D. Smith, Robert Morris University, USA

Charles Smith, Mesa State College Alumni, USA

Judith Symonds, Auckland University of Technology, New Zealand

Samuel Fosso Wamba, Rouen Business School, France

John Weckert, Charles Sturt University, Australia

 

HOW TO CITE THE VOLUME

MLA Style

Michael, M.G. and Katina Michael. "Uberveillance and the Social Implications of Microchip Implants: Emerging Technologies." IGI Global, 2014. 1-509. Web. 24 Dec. 2013. doi:10.4018/978-1-4666-4582-0

APA Style

Michael, M., & Michael, K. (2014). Uberveillance and the Social Implications of Microchip Implants: Emerging Technologies (pp. 1-509). Hershey, PA: IGI Global. doi:10.4018/978-1-4666-4582-0

Chicago Style

Michael, M.G. and Katina Michael. "Uberveillance and the Social Implications of Microchip Implants: Emerging Technologies." 1-509 (2014), accessed December 24, 2013. doi:10.4018/978-1-4666-4582-0

Banking at the supermarket might seem convenient, but you should think twice before putting so much of your information into the hands of a single corporation, writes Katina Michael.

Read more here

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"...A lot of parents worry when their kids first start taking the school bus by themselves. What if they’re snatched from the bus stop? What if they get off at the wrong stop? What if the bus is hijacked? Well, while the Kidtrack system can’t keep any of those things from happening, it can at least keep track of which children are on which buses, and where.

Kidtrack was developed through a collaboration between Fujitsu Frontech North America, and IT/logistics company T&W Operations."

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[ image: extremetech ]

"...With a chilling hint of the not-so-distant future, researchers at the Usenix Security conference have demonstrated a zero-day vulnerabilityin your brain. Using a commercial off-the-shelf brain-computer interface, the researchers have shown that it’s possible to hack your brain, forcing you to reveal information that you’d rather keep secret."

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[ image : michael zappa ]

Today I discussed the upcoming ( or as some would claim already implemented) NBN for Australia with a number of people.

I was pointed to this web presentation.

I was informed about Government 2.0.

I'm linking Leigh Blackall's Ubiquity foray in with other findings.

A recent Four Corners script I think points at what most of us are perhaps already thinking.

Here's what Professor Barber touts as futures service:

Interestingly here's the response to the Skilling Australia initiative raised amongst NBN rhetoric.

Here's the home of NBN Co.

 

IT News ]

 

Here's surveillance mentioned.

I'm sure Josh will be interesting to talk to.

 

 

 

 

Posted
AuthorKatina Michael

"Tumours, Tracking, and Tyranny: The Downside to Implantable Microchip." Stand-in keynote address by Dr Katherine Albrecht, CASPIAN.

This video was taken of Dr Katherine Albrecht delivering her stand-in keynote address at the IEEE Symposium on Technology and Society (ISTAS) held at the University of Wollongong 7-10 June 2010. Dr Albrecht's talk was titled "Tumours, Tracking, and Tyranny: The Downside to Implantable Microchip?"

Dr Albrecht is the director of CASPIAN and the author of the acclaimed: "Spychips: How major corporations and government plan to track your every move with RFID." The theme of the conference was "The Social Implications of Emerging Technologies" and Associate Professor Katina Michael who was the program chair of the conference found it necessary to ensure there was a talk on radio-frequency identification devices for the retail sector.

The program committee, thank Dr Albrecht for delivering a keynote address at only 24 hours notice, given the unforeseen circumstances encountered by another speaker.

Credit: This video was taken by Jordan Brown.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CS13kFWQIYM&feature=relmfu

"The Debate over Microchipping People and the Challenges of RFID"? Panel Session at ISTAS10

This video was taken of a five member panel session that was chaired by Mr William Herbert Deputy Chair of New York State Public Employment Relations Board, USA (for identification purposes only) at the IEEE Symposium on Technology and Society (ISTAS) held at the University of Wollongong 7-10 June 2010.

This impromptu panel session was titled "The Debate over Microchipping People and the Challenges of RFID" and was inspired by the keynote, plenary and invited speakers themselves, as the question of microchipping people was debated over the first two days of the symposium.

The theme of the conference was "The Social Implications of Emerging Technologies." The program chair, Associate Professor Katina Michael who herself has had a long-standing research interest in humancentric RFID alongside her collaborator Dr MG Michael, could not have hoped for a more dynamic symposium- this panel depicts the diversity of opinion on this complex issue of embedded microchips into the body for non-medical applications.

(from left to right): Dr Katherine Albrecht of CASPIAN, Professor Roger Clarke, of the Australian Privacy Foundation, the panel chair Mr William Herbert, Deputy Chair of New York State Public Employment Relations Board, USA (for identification purposes only), Professor Rafael Capurro of the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Dr Mark Gasson of the University of Reading, and Mr Amal Graafstra author of RFID Toys.

Credit: This video was taken by Jordan Brown.

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dI3Rps-VFdo

Dr Dave Hunter of Engineering Technology in the College of Business and Technology at Western Illinois University used Michael and Michael's (2009) reference book titled: "Innovative Automatic Identification and Location-Based Services: from bar codes to chip implants" in Fall 2009 as the main textbook for MET487. The course on auto-ID included different methods of identifying objects automatically and the transmission of that data throughout a facility. Topics included: bar coding, magnetic stripe, radio frequency, data communications, EDI, and systems integration. The subject outline provided additional topics including bar code symbologies, smart cards, biometrics, geographic location systems, wearable computing, the socio-ethical implications of auto-ID, and a final lecture on "Uberveillance."