"Scientists believe they could be on the brink of creating artificial life after they digitized the brain of a worm and successfully placed it inside a robot. [...] Incredibly, they discovered that the bionic simulation behaved in exactly the same way as a real worm — despite the fact that they'd never coded its actual behavior."

Source: http://www.nydailynews.com/news/world/scie...
Posted
AuthorJordan Brown
CategoriesAI, animals

Future "angel" care chips are coming for humans. Digital Angel in 2003 was the first to launch such a program. Then Applied Digital Solutions for Human Wander Alerts, and  PositiveID for Health oriented solutions.

This kind of sentimentalism will be at the crux of marketing campaigns about "chipping loved ones" including the elderly and children for CARE applications.

Read more: http://www.wbul.com/onair/from-the-web-56067/dog-finds-owner-after-being-lost-13694857/#.VYQ83Z9OLNE.facebook#ixzz3xjkja3XG

Punjab would emulate Gujrat and Madhya Pardesh by introducing chip system to maintain exact count of cows in the state.
Revealing this, Punjab Gow Sewa Commission chairman Kimti Lal Bhagat said here on Monday that a micro chip with unique identification number would be implanted in every cow which would be difficult to remove. The technique would help the state prepare a database for cows which would further help in their conservation, he added. He informed that the same company which had undertaken the cow tagging work in the other two states had been hired by Punjab. Chips would also help in checking fraudulent loans and claims against cow insurance policies, he claimed.

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Jul 17, 2007—The American Medical Association (AMA) has officially established a code of ethics designed to protect patients receiving RFID implants. The recommendations focus on safeguarding a patient's privacy and health, and are the result of an evaluation by the AMA's Council on Ethical and Judicial Affairs (CEJA) regarding the medical and ethical implications of RFID chips in humans, as well as a follow-up report recently released. The latter discusses the possible advantages and specific privacy and ethical issues of usingRFID-enabled implantations for clinical purposes. 

Entitled "Radio Frequency ID Devices in Humans," the report is presented by Robert M. Sade, M.D., who chairs the CEJA. It acknowledges that RFID's use in health care "represents another promising development in information technology, but also raises important ethical, legal and social issues." The report adds, "Specifically, the use of RFID labeling in humans for medical purposes may improve patient safety, but also may pose some physical risks, compromise patient privacy, or present other social hazards." 

The AMA's report identifies three specific recommendations: The informed-consent process must include disclosure of medical uncertainties associated with these devices; physicians should strive to protect patients' privacy by storing confidential information only on RFID devices utilizing informational security similar to that required for medical records; and physicians should support research into the safety and efficacy of RFID devices implanted in human beings, and examine the role of doctors regarding the nonmedical uses of the technology. 

The recommendations now serve as ethical guidelines for physicians and caregivers, explains Steven Stack, M.D., a member of the AMA's board of trustees, and are officially part of the AMA's medical ethics code. While not law, the AMA's code of ethics has long served as a standard of conduct defining the essentials of honorable physician behavior. 

"The AMA is the largest professional organization representing the interest of physicians and patients in the U.S.," Stack says, "and the AMA's code of ethics is the most widely accepted guidance for physicians' professional, ethical practices." In fact, he adds, courts and governments often use the AMA's ethics codes as guidelines. 

Central to the AMA's recommendations is that RFID implantable devices still need to be researched. The report indicates such implants may present physical risks to patients, because the devices can migrate under the skin and become difficult to extract. It goes on to say the risks may be minimized "by constructing RFID tags from materials that permit surrounding tissue to encase the device." Furthermore, the document cautions that RFIDtags may electromagnetically interfere with electrosurgical devices (medical tools that use electrical currents for cauterization during surgery) and defibrillators, and that more research needs to be done regarding whether RFID tags might also affect the efficacy of pharmaceuticals.

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Poll taken as of 18 July 2014 indicates 53%|47% for|against technology is enslaving us.

poll for and against iq2.jpg


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City Recital Hall Angel Place
2 Angel Place
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Tuesday, 12 August 2014 
6:45 -8:30 pm

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  The wireless pacemaker is just 3mm long

The wireless pacemaker is just 3mm long

"US researchers have built a wirelessly powered pacemaker the size of a grain of rice and implanted it in a rabbit.

They were able to hold a metal plate a few centimetres above the rabbit's chest and use it to regulate the animal's heartbeat.

If such medical implants could be made to work in humans, it could lead to smaller devices that are safer to fit."

Read more here

Source of article in this academic paper here

For more information about Children's Memorial Hermann Hospital's participation in the Google Glass Explorer Program please visit http://childrens.memorialhermann.org/google-glass/ Learn more about the Houston Zoo at http://www.houstonzoo.org/ Children's Memorial Hermann teamed up with the Houston Zoo, located across the street from the hospital, to allow patients to visit some of their favorite animals through Google Glass.