"...state-of-the-art RFID localization systems fall under two categories. The first category operates with off-the-shelf narrowband RFID tags but makes restrictive assumptions on the environment or the tag’s movement patterns. The second category does not make such restrictive assumptions; however, it requires designing new ultrawideband hardware for RFIDs and uses the large bandwidth to directly compute a tag’s 3D location. Hence, while the first category is restrictive, the second one requires replacing the billions of RFIDs already produced and deployed annually. This paper presents RFind, a new technology that brings the benefits of ultra-wideband localization to the billions of RFIDs in today’s world. RFind does not require changing today’s passive narrowband RFID tags. Instead, it leverages their underlying physical properties to emulate a very large bandwidth and uses it for localization. Our empirical results demonstrate that RFind can emulate over 220MHz of bandwidth on tags designed with a communication bandwidth of only tens to hundreds of kHz, while remaining compliant with FCC regulations. This, combined with a new super resolution algorithm over this bandwidth, enables RFind to perform 3D localization with sub-centimeter accuracy in each of the x/y/z dimensions, without making any restrictive assumptions on the tag’s motion or the environment." 

Read the paper - http://www.mit.edu/~fadel/papers/RFind-paper.pdf

More about the project - https://www.media.mit.edu/projects/rfid-localization/overview/

Posted
Authoralexanderhayes
TagsRFIDs

"...In football-mad Argentina, fans are known for belting out an almost amorous chant to their favourite clubs: "I carry you inside me!" First-division side Tigre said it had decided to take that to the next level and is offering fans implantable microchips that will open the stadium turnstiles on match days, no ticket or ID required. "Carrying the club inside you won't just be a metaphor," the club wrote on its Twitter account. - Read more

Slide1.JPG
What medical uses could injectable electronics enable?
The medical uses are potentially huge. "The technology could be used to help recover tissues following a brain injury or help manage diabetes by providing an intelligent solution for controlling insulin levels," says Collette Johnson, Medical Business Development Manager at Plextek Consulting. "Injectable electronics could also provide similar applications in chemical regulation of the brain for people with imbalances, as well as for individuals with growth hormone-related diseases. They could also be used to help control prosthetics by reacting to muscle motion."
In June the Lieber Research Group at Harvard University unveiled an injectable mesh that was able to detect electrical signals within mice brains, which could help scientists unravel how the brain's cells communicate. The mesh was injected through a needle just 0.1mm in diameter.
Could injected electronics be the next wave of wearable tech?
"Yes, technology is fast advancing to a stage where this is possible," says Kamat. "These types of treatments could be made feasible by microelectronics, which can be injected or delivered at desired locations in the body via minimally invasive procedures." For anyone squeamish about having things physically inserted under the skin, Kamat points out that ID tags have been implanted in pets for tracking purposes for years.
Punjab would emulate Gujrat and Madhya Pardesh by introducing chip system to maintain exact count of cows in the state.
Revealing this, Punjab Gow Sewa Commission chairman Kimti Lal Bhagat said here on Monday that a micro chip with unique identification number would be implanted in every cow which would be difficult to remove. The technique would help the state prepare a database for cows which would further help in their conservation, he added. He informed that the same company which had undertaken the cow tagging work in the other two states had been hired by Punjab. Chips would also help in checking fraudulent loans and claims against cow insurance policies, he claimed.

More here

The corporate tenants of a Swedish high-tech office complex are having RFID chips implanted in their hands, enabling access through security doors, as well as services such as copy machines, all without PIN codes or swipe cards.
The employees working at Epicenter, a 15,000-square-foot building in Stockholm, can even pay for lunch using their implants -- just as they would with the swipe of a credit card.
The owners of Epicenter say they want the facility to be a "magnet for fast growing digital companies and cutting-edge creative corporate initiatives."
"The fact that some people at the Epicenter office have chosen to replace their key fobs with NFC implants is their own personal choice," said Hannes Sjöblad, founder of Bionyfiken, a Swedish association of Biohackers. "It's a small, but indeed fast-growing, fraction which has chosen to try it out."
Sjöblad said there are also several other offices, companies, gyms and education institutions in Stockholm where people access the facilities with implanted RFID/NFC chips (near field communication).

More here

Have you ever lost or left your work pass at home? Well, the Swedes have a solution. Get microchipped.

A new office block in Sweden is offering workers the chance to have a microchip implanted under their skin to allow them to access to various services within the building.

A tiny gadget the size of a grain of rice is implanted in employees hands.

It then allows them to open doors, or use the printer, without a traditional pass card.

The microchip implants are optional.

Employee, Elicico De Costa, decided to get one and hasn't looked back since.

'It can contain contact details. I think it can do a lot of other stuff in the future.' Mr De Costa said.

It's expected the chip will eventually enable staff to log on to computers or pay for food in the cafe.

But the new pass is still having teething problems, with some staff reporting their chips don't always work.

A number of employees like, Ann-Catherine Liska, have opted for the traditional pass for now.

'I don't feel that its necessary for opening doors or connecting with machines.' Ms Liska said.

Hannes Sjoblad, one of the tiny RFID (radio-frequency identification) chip developers, said they could be part of all future workplaces.

"We already interact with technology all the time. Today it's a bit messy - we need pin codes and passwords. Wouldn't it be easy to just touch with your hand? That's really intuitive."' Mr Sjoblad said.

He said its launch at the Sime office in Stockholm will provide more research into the technology.

"We want to be able to understand this technology before big corporates and big government come to us and say everyone should get chipped - the tax authority chip, the Google or Facebook chip." Mr Sjoblad said.

More here

Posted
AuthorKatina Michael

Thanks OG and KMA.

My observation? How long before this technology becomes mainstream? And then even the body-modders might be asking themselves that the 'group' they identify with is no longer unique... implantables, like tattoos, like piercing are about being 'different' but also the 'same'... But when everybody has one, even the boring old banks, will the body-modders really want one? "Yes" if it means customisation, and "no" if they think it means conformity to the masses.

le matins.jpg

"Ils portent le nom de leur amour sous leur peau

Un studio de tatouage à Zürich propose l'implant de micropuces électroniques lisibles via un smartphone. Une première en Suisse qui fait débat.

Mis à jour le 13.09.2014

Laura Juliano"

More here

 

Now compare with the football tattoo craze here and rugby league tattoo craze here.

 Telegraph.uk

Telegraph.uk

 CanberraTimes

CanberraTimes



 Source: http://www.abc.net.au/tv/bigideas/stories/2014/09/04/4081183.htm

Source: http://www.abc.net.au/tv/bigideas/stories/2014/09/04/4081183.htm

 Source: http://www.iq2oz.com/debates/we-are-becoming-enslaved-by-our-technology-/

Source: http://www.iq2oz.com/debates/we-are-becoming-enslaved-by-our-technology-/

 Source: http://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/bigideas/enslaved-by-our-technology3f/5598912

Source: http://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/bigideas/enslaved-by-our-technology3f/5598912

 Source: http://www.acola.org.au/index.php/news/70-we-are-becoming-enslaved-by-our-technology

Source: http://www.acola.org.au/index.php/news/70-we-are-becoming-enslaved-by-our-technology