Source: http://www.abc.net.au/tv/bigideas/stories/2014/09/04/4081183.htm

Source: http://www.abc.net.au/tv/bigideas/stories/2014/09/04/4081183.htm

 Source: http://www.iq2oz.com/debates/we-are-becoming-enslaved-by-our-technology-/

Source: http://www.iq2oz.com/debates/we-are-becoming-enslaved-by-our-technology-/

 Source: http://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/bigideas/enslaved-by-our-technology3f/5598912

Source: http://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/bigideas/enslaved-by-our-technology3f/5598912

 Source: http://www.acola.org.au/index.php/news/70-we-are-becoming-enslaved-by-our-technology

Source: http://www.acola.org.au/index.php/news/70-we-are-becoming-enslaved-by-our-technology

"“Glass is very aware of the user,” he said. “There’s consequences to that, and things to consider and be careful about. But there’s also opportunity for a computer that’s very close to the person.”"

"Google has big hopes for its Glass head-mounted computer, chief among them a desire to make the unit smaller and more comfortable to wear.
Those were just a couple of the goals for a polished version of the device laid out Tuesday by Babak Parviz, the creator of Glass, who is also the director of Google’s “X” special projects division.
“Essentially we’d like to make the technology disappear,” he said during a conference on wearable technology in San Francisco.
“It should be non-intrusive” and as comfortable to wear as regular glasses or a wristwatch, he said.
Shrinking the unit would require advances in optics and photonics, he said. More computing power is also needed to make the device faster at answering people’s questions on the fly, Parviz said.

More here

 Image:  IT News

Image: IT News

“We are going to have a lot of fun around the information management aspects of body worn video – let alone the more prosaic problem of how am I going to get this stuff from the field to a central repository with as few moving parts as possible."

Read more: http://www.itnews.com.au/News/387109,nsw-police-cio-prepares-for-copper-cam-data-deluge.aspx#ixzz33S4pamm6

"Kidnappings in Mexico have worsened in the last 5 years, sky-rocketing by 371%. So too have the demand for those RFID implants that were said to allow authorities find the victims. Except for one thing: they don't work.

Mexico has a pretty serious kidnapping problem-so serious that there is now a market for a $4,000...Read more

The main problem is that the technology, for a number of reasons, couldn't have worked in the first place. For one, the implants are much too small for a satellite to pick up. And that's without taking into account the barriers the implant's signal would have to overcome—that is, metal, concrete, and the water of the human body. For another, the implants can't be trusted to broadcast a signal without losing its teeny tiny charge.

And even if the police did manage to pick up the signal, there'd be no time to mount a raid to save you. All told, you're probably only about 1% less screwed.

That hasn't stopped RFID manufacturers from raking in the money in the last two years. Xega's still very much at it, even after admitting the technology is "bad for the country." UPIwrites:

Xega charges people seeking the implant $2,000 up front, with annual fees of $2,000. For their money, implant customers get a radio frequency identification chip implanted into the fatty tissue of the arm.

Dickbaggery, thy name is RFID peddlers. [Washington Post via UPI]"

  Photo Credit: AP Photo/Diario de Nuevo Laredo

Photo Credit: AP Photo/Diario de Nuevo Laredo

Read more here in Gizmodo and compare with this article on Mexico's Geolocalization Law (2012).

Thanks anthropunk!

 Palo Alto police cruisers are now equipped with new video systems, including five cameras instead of a previous two. The above camera is on the exterior of a cruiser. Courtesy Palo Alto Police Department. Source: http://www.paloaltoonline.com/news/2014/03/20/palo-alto-police-embrace-new-recording-technology

Palo Alto police cruisers are now equipped with new video systems, including five cameras instead of a previous two. The above camera is on the exterior of a cruiser. Courtesy Palo Alto Police Department. Source: http://www.paloaltoonline.com/news/2014/03/20/palo-alto-police-embrace-new-recording-technology

  Palo Alto police cruisers are now equipped with new video systems, including five cameras instead of a previous two. Courtesy Palo Alto Police Department.

Palo Alto police cruisers are now equipped with new video systems, including five cameras instead of a previous two. Courtesy Palo Alto Police Department.

"The Palo Alto Police Department has recently installed new video systems on dozens of cruisers, replacing the recording systems that were first installed on police vehicles in 2006. In addition to the usual enhancements one can expect with video upgrades -- high-definition video and high-fidelity audio -- the new recording systems have an additional feature: the ability to record and review what happened before an incident even occurs.

Unlike the previously used Mobile In-Car Video System, which included two cameras on the cruiser, the new systems include five. This means new cameras on the cruisers' sides and rearview mirrors, according a report from the police department.

"We've already had a few cases where actions of our officers that would not have been captured on the old system were completely captured on the new one, which allowed us to have a clear view of what went on," said Lt. Zach Perron, the department's public information manager. "That's exactly what we want to have."

The improvement in audio quality is also significant, he said. Audio recordings in the new systems have far more range and can work "through objects," Perron said."

Read more here.

 Popular Mech

Popular Mech

Transient

The Art of Flying Your Very Own Drone

Drones are coming to American skies—not just for surveillance or security work, but also for hobbyists. If you want to pilot your own drone, learn the ABCs of UAVs.

Read more

"Over a four-month period I learned how to fly three multicopters: a super-simple $300 Parrot AR.Drone 2.0, a $680 DJI Phantom, and a tricked-out, six-rotor $1300 3D Robotics Y6. Multicopters have anywhere from three to eight rotors, are highly maneuverable, and can hover and fly in virtually any direction. These are good starter drones, because they are generally quite controllable and won't disappear over the horizon in a hurry, the way fixed-wing craft tend to do. 

But as I found out, multicopter flying is not without its challenges. Things can sometimes go haywire faster than you can react. Plus, piloting one can be a mind-bending exercise in relative positioning. Multicopters are symmetrical, so it's not always obvious which way your drone is "facing." Remote control usually involves either a radio-control unit with dual analog sticks and a dizzying array of switches and buttons (many of which do nothing), or, in the case of the Parrot AR.Drone, an iOS or Android smartphone or tablet with onscreen virtual controls. Regardless, operation can get a little complicated. When your drone flies behind you and you turn around to face it, the directional controls are now the reverse of what they were when it was in front of you—likewise, if you swivel your drone to face a new direction without reorienting your own body, the drone moves sideways relative to you. For this reason, I suggest keeping your first flights low and close by, and that you find a wide, open area to practice in—I used a local dog park. Also, purchase a few extra propellers, because you're going to crash your drone. And that's okay, because repairing your drone is part of the hobby. 

In terms of accessibility, the Parrot AR.Drone 2.0 is the newbie's top choice. It is affordable, durable, comes with a battery and an onboard camera, and is controlled via a smartphone. You can even fly it indoors—it comes with a removable hull that protects the rotors from bumps into walls, pets, and people. Takeoff and landing are accomplished with a single button. The AR.Drone has a sonar sensor that keeps it a fixed distance from the ground, and its 720p camera records a video to your tablet or phone as it flies. 

I had fun flying it, and my nerdy little toy impressed my nerdy friends. But the limitations surfaced quickly. The standard battery for the model I tested was rated for 1000 milliampere-hours—good for a paltry 12 minutes of air time. The company now sells a 1500-mAhr battery for longer flight times. Also, since the AR.Drone is controlled via Wi-Fi, it is constrained in its range to about 165 feet from the controller. There's plenty of fun to be had within that range, but more sophisticated choppers put it to shame. 

For instance, the Phantom, a ready-to-fly quadrotor from DJI, has a range of almost 1000 feet from the controller. But I wouldn't suggest sending it that far afield—at any distance greater than 500 feet, the drone becomes a coin-size white blob against the clouds. The Phantom is also fast, with a top speed of more than 20 mph—although that kind of hot-dogging will chew through a 2200-mAhr battery (which is not included) in 10 to 15 minutes. 

The quadrotor also uses a GPS sensor and digital compass to do away with the orientation problem that plagues most multicopters. Phantom has two Intelligent Orientation Control settings that normalize its forward motion regardless of which way the drone is facing. One IOC setting fixes the Phantom to a grid, which still reverses the controls if you fly it behind you. The other setting fixes the craft to a radius around its launch point; forward motion moves it away from you, reverse brings it back. I found this massively useful once I attached a GoPro to the Phantom's camera mount. I could then steer the camera in any direction yet still fly the aircraft relative to my own postion. It was like having a helicopter cameraman at my disposal for home movies. Now I have tons of aerial footage of my kids playing with the neighborhood dogs in the park, and a few high-altitude pans that give a view of my entire town. 
 

The Überdrone

On the upper end of the (or, at least, my) cost-and-complexity curve is the 3D Robotics Y6 hexacopter, using the APM:Copter software platform, which was the last and most ambitious drone I tried. You can build this three-arm, six-rotor craft yourself for $400 to $600 in parts (depending on the options you select), or you can have 3D Robotics build it for you for $700 to $1300. Fully tricked out, a 3D Robotics multicopter can be flown manually with a remote control, or it can do autonomous waypoint navigation. It can be accessorized with a wireless-telemetry kit that communicates with your laptop and a first-person-view camera that broadcasts back to a screen or video goggles. And it can also support a servo-driven tilting gimbal for real-time control of a second video camera. The idea is that you guide the aircraft with the low-res broadcast camera and record with a hi-def camera on the gimbal. Its six motors make the Y6 a strong beast, capable of lifting a heavy payload—some of which is its own large battery (the company suggests at least 4200 mAhr). The drone can also survive one or more motor failures while maintaining flight."

"Imagine you’re walking around the British Library. Suddenly, your smartphone beeps at you. A library app is alerting you to the resources around you. You ask the app to search for a specific book. The app tells you where to go to find it. The smartphone goes to sleep. You reach the suggested reading room. The smartphone wakes up. The app tells you which shelf the book is on, posts up its publication details and reviews, and informs you about related events happening in the library."

Read more 

War robots and the 2014 World Cup – defenders off the field

By Katina Michael, University of Wollongong and MG Michael, University of Wollongong

High-tech robots called PackBots will be unleashed during the 2014 FIFA World Cup in Brazil to help boost security and examine suspicious objects.

The Brazilian government purportedly spent US$7.2 million to buy 30 military-grade robots from designers iRobot that will police the stadiums throughout Brazil’s 12 host cities during soccer matches.

PackBot is a hunk of metal with an extendable arm and tactile claw, jam-packed on-board sensors and a computer with overheat protection, nine high-resolution cameras and lasers and two-way audio.

But is it overkill to implement wartime robots to a sporting event?

Sport’s history of violence

On April 30 1993, then-world number 1 tennis sensation Monica Seles was stabbed in the back while playing a quarter-final at Hamburg’s Rothenbaum. She was only 19.

That incident not only changed the course of women’s tennis history but also changed the face of security in sport.

Of course, we can also point to the Munich massacre of the 11 members of the Israeli Olympic team during the 1972 Summer Olympics in West Germany in rethinking approaches to the safety of high-profile athletes.

It was Seles’ plight however, that brought attention to an ever-increasing problem of public figure security. Her stabbing in Hamburg had naught to do with terrorism, and more to do with her perpetrator’s fixation on arch rival Steffi Graf. Player safety was going to become even bigger business.

It was floated that the Rothenbaum tournament organisers had spent A$650,000 on security, and that Seles herself had employed security guards to protect her at all her tournament appearances. So what went wrong?

The human factor

Not only are people unpredictable but intervention is almost impossible if one cannot anticipate the actions of another. On November 13 1982, one of Australia’s great wicket takers Terry Alderman made a costly mistake when he took security matters into his own hands.

The West Australian was disabled for over a year with a shoulder injury he sustained when he came off second best after attempting to tackle an English-supporting ground invader at the WACA Ground in Perth.

     

The after-game kick-to-kick tradition at the MCG is a rare sight these days.

        Flying Cloud/Flickr, CC BY

     

Such has become the concern over security that spectators can no longer spill onto the grounds after the final siren to get close to their heroes.

Pitch invasions had long been a tradition of Australian Football League (AFL), and at the end of matches supporters could run onto the field to celebrate the game and play kick-to-kick with their family and friends.

But in recent years stricter controls were introduced and finally the “rushing the field” was banned, to the great disappointment of fans.

The non-human factor

What makes PackBots attractive for civilian security situations, such as large-scale sporting tournaments?

PackBots made their debut in Afghanistan as far back as 2002. During the “war on terror” these uninhabited systems had several tasks:

  • to clear bunkers
  • search in caves
  • enter collapsed buildings in search of life
  • cross minefields
  • conduct surveillance.

This began a trend of development subsequently in Iraq and other US conflicts, until recently when they went where no human would want to go, the Fukushima nuclear facility in March 2011 after the devastation of the Japanese tsunami.

There are certainly positive uses to these uninhabited systems which few would argue against.

The next generation warrior: Packbot in the field in action in Afghanistan in 2002.

PackBots can move faster than 14km/h, rotate 360 degrees, traverse rugged terrain, climb up 60% grades and even swim in water, being able to cope with being submerged up to two metres. It can even be remotely operated with hardly any lag using a joystick.

iRobot’s bots are not recent entries into the commercial market. No, many of us would have been introduced to the domestication of the robot by the introduction of the company’s Roomba household cleaning machine.

Roombas: sometimes for cleaning, often for cat videos.

And the use of electronics in sport isn’t new. Hawk-Eye officiates whether the ball was in or out of the sideline, FoxCopter hovers above spectators at the cricket just to give us up-close personal shots of players and the third umpire adjudicates challenges.

But now the PackBots are coming: ostensibly precise, they are not supposed to malfunction or act against the controller’s wishes (or those instructions that they have been programmed with) and they cannot be easily destroyed. In the not-so-distant future they could use their cameras to observe you, their chemical sensors to breathalyse you, their extended arm to trap you and their claw to handcuff you.

We are giving over control to machine entities, or better still, “objects and units” outside of ourselves.

In fact many argue we have already lost great chunks of our autonomy without the expected commensurate increase in security. Will the natural instincts and creative inputs of human beings become increasingly redundant in a world where the “tin man” has the final say?

Katina Michael receives funding from the Australian Research Council (ARC). She is affiliated with the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) and the Australian Privacy Foundation (APF).

MG Michael does not work for, consult to, own shares in or receive funding from any company or organisation that would benefit from this article, and has no relevant affiliations.

The Conversation

This article was originally published on The Conversation.

          Read the original article.

       

It is with great joy that MG and I write to let you know that the Uberveillance edited volume is finally in stores and available for purchase. We encourage you to ask your libraries to purchase the volume. Of significance are the coming together of well-known voices in the surveillance field to discuss the definition and impact of uberveillance, including Katherine Albrecht, Roger Clarke, Mark Gasson, Kevin Haggerty, Steve Mann, Ellen McGee, Kevin Warwick, Marcus Wigan and numerous authorities on the topic of microchipping people. This volume contains 17 book chapters, and 7 interviews and panel presentations as well as full referencing of source materials in some 500 pages.

 "Uberveillance" edited volume by Michael and Michael (2014)

"Uberveillance" edited volume by Michael and Michael (2014)

 

CONTENTS PAGE

PART A The Veillances

Chapter 1 Introduction: On the “Birth” of Uberveillance  (pages 1-31) M. G. Michael (University of Wollongong, Australia)

Chapter 2 Veillance: Beyond Surveillance, Dataveillance, Uberveillance, and the Hypocrisy of One-Sided Watching  (pages 32-45) Steve Mann (University of Toronto, Canada)

Chapter 3 Uberveillance: Where Wear and Educative Arrangement  (pages 46-62) Alexander Hayes (University of Wollongong, Australia)

PART B Applications of Humancentric Implantables

Chapter 4 Practical Experimentation with Human Implants  (pages 64-132) Kevin Warwick (University of Reading, UK), Mark N. Gasson (University of Reading, UK)

Chapter 5 Knowledge Recovery: Applications of Technology and Memory  (pages 133-142) Maria E. Burke (University of Salford, UK), Chris Speed (University of Edinburgh, UK)

PART C Adoption of RFID Implants for Humans

Chapter 6 Willingness to Adopt RFID Implants: Do Personality Factors Play a Role in the Acceptance of Uberveillance?  (pages 144-168) Christine Perakslis (Johnson and Wales University, USA)

Chapter 7 Surveilling the Elderly: Emerging Demographic Needs and Social Implications of RFID Chip Technology Use  (pages 169-185) Randy Basham (University of Texas – Arlington, USA)

PART D Tracking and Tracing Laws, Directives, Regulations, and Standards

Chapter 8 Towards the Blanket Coverage DNA Profiling and Sampling of Citizens in England, Wales, and Northern Ireland  (pages 187-207) Katina Michael (University of Wollongong, Australia)

Chapter 9 ID Scanners and Überveillance in the Night-Time Economy: Crime Prevention or Invasion of Privacy?  (pages 208-225) Darren Palmer (Deakin University, Australia), Ian Warren (Deakin University, Australia), Peter Miller (Deakin University, Australia)

Chapter 10 Global Tracking Systems in the Australian Interstate Trucking Industry  (pages 226-234) Jann Karp (C.C.C. Australia, Australia)

Chapter 11 Tracking Legislative Developments in Relation to “Do Not Track” Initiatives  (pages 235-259) Brigette Garbin (University of Queensland, Australia), Kelly Staunton (University of Queensland, Australia), Mark Burdon (University of Queensland, Australia)

Chapter 12 Uberveillance, Standards, and Anticipation: A Case Study on Nanobiosensors in U.S. Cattle  (pages 260-279) Kyle Powys Whyte (Michigan State University, USA), Monica List (Michigan State University, USA), John V. Stone (Michigan State University, USA), Daniel Grooms (Michigan State University, USA), Stephen Gasteyer (Michigan State University, USA), Paul B. Thompson (Michigan State University, USA), Lawrence Busch (Michigan State University, USA), Daniel Buskirk (Michigan State University, USA), Erica Giorda (Michigan State University, USA), Hilda Bouri (Michigan State University, USA)

PART E Health Implications of Microchipping Living Things

Chapter 13 Microchip-Induced Tumors in Laboratory Rodents and Dogs: A Review of the Literature 1990–2006  (pages 281-317) Katherine Albrecht (CASPIAN Consumer Privacy, USA)

PART F Socio-Ethical Implications of RFID Tags and Transponders

Chapter 14 Privacy and Pervasive Surveillance: A Philosophical Analysis  (pages 319-350) Alan Rubel (University of Wisconsin – Madison, USA)

Chapter 15 Neuroethics and Implanted Brain Machine Interfaces  (pages 351-365) Ellen M. McGee (Independent Researcher, USA)

Chapter 16 We Are the Borg! Human Assimilation into Cellular Society  (pages 366-407) Ronnie D. Lipschutz (University of California - Santa Cruz, USA), Rebecca J. Hester (University of Texas Medical Branch, USA)

Chapter 17 Uberveillance and Faith-Based Organizations: A Renewed Moral Imperative  (pages 408-416) Marcus Wigan (Oxford Systematics, Australia & Edinburgh Napier University, UK)

Acronyms and Abbreviations

Compilation of References

About the Contributors

Index

EDITORIAL ADVISORY BOARD

Roba Abbas, University of Wollongong, Australia

Greg Adamson, University of Melbourne, Australia

Katherine Albrecht, CASPIAN, USA

Anas Aloudat, University of Jordan, Jordan

Michael V. Arnold, University of Melbourne, Australia

Emilia Belleboni, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Spain

Rafael Capurro, University of Wisconsin – Milwaukee, USA

Kenneth Foster, University of Pennsylvania, USA

Amal Graafstra, Amal.net, USA

Mireille Hildebrandt, Erasmus University Rotterdam, The Netherlands

Peter Hyland, University of Wollongong, Australia

Nicholas Huber, Accenture, Australia

Indrawati, Institut Manajemen Telkom, Indonesia

Eleni Kosta, K. U. Leuven, Belgium

Ronald Leenes, Tilburg University, The Netherlands

Avner Levin, Ryerson University, Canada

Michael Loui, University of Illinois – Urbana-Champaign, USA

Noëmi Manders-Huits, Delft University of Technology, The Netherlands

Keith W. Miller, University of Missouri – St. Louis, USA

Lyria Bennett Moses, University of New South Wales, Australia

Christine Perakslis, Johnson and Wales University, USA

Laura Perusco, Macquarie Bank, UK

Kenneth Pimple, Indiana University – Bloomington, USA

Joseph Savirimuthu, University of Liverpool, UK

Alan D. Smith, Robert Morris University, USA

Charles Smith, Mesa State College Alumni, USA

Judith Symonds, Auckland University of Technology, New Zealand

Samuel Fosso Wamba, Rouen Business School, France

John Weckert, Charles Sturt University, Australia

 

HOW TO CITE THE VOLUME

MLA Style

Michael, M.G. and Katina Michael. "Uberveillance and the Social Implications of Microchip Implants: Emerging Technologies." IGI Global, 2014. 1-509. Web. 24 Dec. 2013. doi:10.4018/978-1-4666-4582-0

APA Style

Michael, M., & Michael, K. (2014). Uberveillance and the Social Implications of Microchip Implants: Emerging Technologies (pp. 1-509). Hershey, PA: IGI Global. doi:10.4018/978-1-4666-4582-0

Chicago Style

Michael, M.G. and Katina Michael. "Uberveillance and the Social Implications of Microchip Implants: Emerging Technologies." 1-509 (2014), accessed December 24, 2013. doi:10.4018/978-1-4666-4582-0

Compare these scenes from Enemy of the State (1998) with the video posted by Katina Michael on Communications of the ACM regarding the limits of watching.

"We're there now!"  

 A scene from  Enemy of the State  (1998)

A scene from Enemy of the State (1998)

 A scene from  Enemy of the State   (1998)

A scene from Enemy of the State  (1998)

Now read this article on the limits of watching by Katina and MG Michael (2013) and watch the following report as an addendum to the article.

 Covert HD Audio-Visual Recording Pen purchased in 2011

Covert HD Audio-Visual Recording Pen purchased in 2011

Read more

 Courtesy: Locaid

Courtesy: Locaid

"The technology for verifying whether a person can legally gamble in a particular location is important. States have to verify whether a gambler is within state borders or not, given the variation in online gambling laws in the U.S. If a player cannot legally gamble where they are and the provider cannot verify that location, the result will be a higher cost for the online gambling site and lost credibility with regulators.
Gerber said the technology is spoof proof because it relies on multiple methods for verifying location. One technology is server-based, where the firm uses triangulation. It gets a fix on a cell phone by figuring out where it is relative to multiple cell phone towers in the area. Cell phones always seeks out the nearest tower. Locaid also checks with a Wi-Fi service provider about the location of a user on its network, and it checks the Internet protocol (IP) address of the user. If all of those methods show that the user is within the borders of a state that provides online gambling, then it tells the provider that it’s OK to offer gambling services to that player.
“The location data we provide is the only one that can’t be spoofed,” Gerber said. “In cities with concentrated towers, it can get to within 5-feet accuracy range.”
But to provide those services in the gambling industry, Locaid has to show it is a legitimate company, so it had to provide about six inches of paperwork vouching for the company and its executives, Gerber said. Three states have passed laws permitting some form of online gambling, and other states, such as California, are considering bills to approve online gambling. At some point, Gerber said, his company will have a real market for its “location-as-a-service” business."


Read more at http://venturebeat.com/2013/08/13/locaid-aims-to-provide-precise-locations-for-online-gambling-services/#h54V5caCcA50YBo1.99

 

I couldn't help myself but narrate my own version of events... typically if we believe UNIQUL then the following is also possible. Hope you enjoy my take on the plausible narration!  Watch the 'film' and read what I've written.

 

Scenario 1: The store

"Imagine coming to a store, and you think your wallet is already there. You pick up your things, approach to the checkout, give a meaningful nod, and then are told you cannot buy your groceries because you have no money left in your bank account to make that transaction because you are the victim of a cyber-attack- someone has stolen your biometrics." 

"Imagine you go to the police, and they tell you the transaction was less than $1000 and that police resources are better spent fighting drug problems on the street. You leave the station and you fully comprehend that there is NO way to change your face because it is NOT like changing your VISA card." 

 

Scenario 2: Catching a flight

 "Imagine you are late to your plane... there is a huge queue... you try to instantly check in... and as you are photographed to make that 6.30 am flight, you are stopped by border control and told you are under arrest for suspected terrorism charges. Your image has been muddled up with someone else and you cannot see your wife and family for 48 hours while you are under interrogation. You tell them you are NOT the one, but the algorithm says you are."

 

Scenario 3: Paying for Petrol

"Imagine you drive to the petrol station. You casually fuel your tank. And as you look at the payment screen you are given a warning by your boss- 'YOU ARE LATE FOR WORK, YET AGAIN! YOU ARE FIRED'... It dawns on you, that you cannot pay for your rent and you cannot pay for your fuel any longer. You are forced to leave your vehicle behind... there is not enough petrol to make it home."

 

Scenario 4: Buying Clothing

"Imagine, the shop where all those magic things came to life. You go into the store with your friends... just to show it off.. and as you enter you get checked in by a facial recognition camera, and are seen purchasing upmarket clothing. Well, this is not fiction any more. Everyone is smiling, and you think you are real cool... you all have a Finalqul account... that is until you press the OKAY key, and an alarm bell rings and you are accused of shoplifting 5 days prior, because of a false match against the biometric database. You try to tell your friends you are innocent... but they just walk away and desert you calling you an absolute loser. Processing takes under a second but you spend years trying to clear your name."

 

CLOSE

"Hi. I'm your worst enemy FINALQUL [machine inspired by WITCHCRAFT]". 

 

Thanks Huffington Post for reporting on this story on this page. The article in HuffPost was written by Betty Isaacson. 

In 2005, I jointly ran a single person participant observation using this Magellan GPS below, to track and monitor the behaviour of a SINGLE individual. Gotta say we were way ahead of our time! Compare the photo from the research study I co-wrote with the image that appears at the bottom of the screen printed in The Independent news article.

 Courtesy: Michael, McNamee et al. "Location-Based Intelligence – Modeling Behavior in Humans using GPS"  IEEE International Symposium on Technology and Society,  New York, United States: IEEE, 2006. Available at: http://works.bepress.com/kmichael/6   

Courtesy: Michael, McNamee et al. "Location-Based Intelligence – Modeling Behavior in Humans using GPS" IEEE International Symposium on Technology and Society, New York, United States: IEEE, 2006. Available at: http://works.bepress.com/kmichael/6

 

"The revelation that George Osborne has begun using Jawbone Up, the activity-tracking wristband that monitors how much you move during the day and whether you sleep enough at night, caused some mirth in Westminster last week.

But the Chancellor isn’t the only one joining in the wearable technology trend. Marissa Mayer, CEO of Yahoo!, is giving Up wristbands to its 11,000 employees, and tech industry observers foresee a time when the activity tracker is issued to new employees with their laptop and smartphone.
While wearable computing isn’t new, this year it’s everywhere. Activity trackers like Jawbone Up and Fitbit Flex are increasingly prominent. Google Glass, the computer-enhanced eyewear with in-built camera, speaker and internet connectivity has a growing profile. And smartwatches, such as the Pebble, are moving smartphone features to a wristwatch.
Juniper research says that 15 million wearable computing gadgets will be sold this year and expects that to increase to 70 million by 2017. If Apple’s rumoured iWatch appears, then expect growth to hasten.

Wristbands, watches and glasses are just the beginning. Next-generation wearables will be part of the fabric of our clothes – literally. London-based CuteCircuit has developed a mobile phone dress with an antenna in the seam and the SIM card in the label. Artist and designer Dominic Wilcox’s No Place Like Home shoes use GPS and LED lights to give directions." 

 

 Titled: From Head to Toe - Wearable Computingraphic: John Bradley

Titled: From Head to Toe - Wearable Computingraphic: John Bradley

It is great to see research of this nature hitting the airwaves of Nature.

The authors have done a great job in providing a convincing argument with data over a 15 month period and 1.5 million records.

 Source: http://www.nature.com/srep/2013/130325/srep01376/full/srep01376.html

Source: http://www.nature.com/srep/2013/130325/srep01376/full/srep01376.html

I've gone through the list of references and have found many that we have previously cited in our own work which provides additional confidence in the literature reviewed. For example, see the work of Roba Abbas in the special issue in the Journal of Location-Based Services of Dec 2011 here where similar data of a small-scale trial of real users was depicted using GIS for representation and scenarios. Roba's PhD was part of an Australian Research Council Discovery grant on Location-based services Regulation in Australia that received a high commendation on completion. Other papers that could add inspiration to the paper in Nature for those seeking additional references include papers submitted to this special issue as a whole that included individual submissions by Hamed Ketabdar of Deutsche Telekom Labs, Clarke & Wigan of Australia, Michael and Michael's editorial which is still the most read article in JLBS according to Taylor and Francis Online, among others .

"...EPFL scientists have developed a tiny, portable personal blood testing laboratory: a minuscule device implanted just under the skin provides an immediate analysis of substances in the body, and a radio module transmits the results to a doctor over the cellular phone network."

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"....Hi! We're Amanda and Ville from Sweden. We got the mission to find out what lifelogging is. So we went on a trip around the world and met with people on the forefront of the lifelogging trend. People like Thad Sterner who's working with Google Glasses and Gordon Bell who is a researcher at Microsoft and Steve Mann who is the founding father of the whole lifelogging movement. We filmed the whole trip and the material will be edited into a documentary premiering later this winter. Stay tuned, and follow us on blog.memoto.com!"

"For many parents and caregivers of daycare and elementary school age children, it is essential to know what sickness is going around in the community or at school. Busy professionals, individuals with compromised immune systems, senior centers and school nurses that need to stay healthy can all use SikBug to avoid becoming exposed. It is helpful for any health organization to identify and address the track the spread of colds, flu and other contagious disease.
Qwinix recognized this opportunity and developed an innovative application to help locate and report contagious disease. Designed for Android, iPhone and Windows Phone, SikBug is a tool that allows the app to get users’ precise locations using the Global Positioning System (GPS) or network location sources such as cell towers and Wi-Fi. These location services must be turned on and available to the individual user’s device for the app to make use of them.
Additionally, SikBug has included the API document on its website to help track the data.
Qwinix developed this platform to include check in, report and store options to monitor the sicknesses going around, and it also displays the various types of contagious illnesses and the number of reported occurrences for each based on the locations."

See Qwinix Technologies for more.

 Courtesy: Qwinix Technologies

Courtesy: Qwinix Technologies

This application is very similar in concept to that app we built with my CSCI321 group at the University of Wollongong. Here is what we documented way back in 2006- The Avian Flu Tracker. The product was demonstrated at the annual Tradeshow at UOW with a REAL working system implementation which used Nortel's Mobile Location Centre (MLC). At the time AVIAN was topical and there was a great deal of discussion about pandemic outbreaks. We learnt so much on that project! The development team consisted of: B. Stroh, O. Berry, A. Muhlbauer, and T. Nicholls. You guys were brilliant! Thanks also to the late Martin Dawson who was a brilliant mentor and never tired of sharing/mentoring the team, and to David Evans for the many meetings he provided input to.